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Wk 1 Complete

Week 1 Complete AOL 3051

Book: Davis, D. (2011). The Adult Learner’s Companion: A Guide for the Adult College Student. [Savant Learning Systems]. Retrieved from https://savantlearningsystems.vitalsource.com/#/books/9781133420453/

This week, you learned how to establish and maintain effective attitudes for success as you embark on your academic journey. Your READ and ATTEND sections discussed ways to visualize success, manage any fears you have, focus on your strengths, recognize opportunities, and apply your practical experience, knowledge, skills, and wisdom to your studies. For your Unit 1 Complete assignment, write a narrative essay (minimum 1200 words) in which you thoroughly address and discuss the questions and statements listed below. Use at least three scholarly sources and remember to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the READ and ATTEND sections in your essay (these count as scholarly sources). Cite your sources in APA format. Learn about scholarly sources by visiting this Library website: 
https://bethelu.libguides.com/scholarlysources
.

· What obstacles do you anticipate in your academic career? How can you apply what you learned this week to reframe those obstacles as opportunities?

· Choose at least five activities or tasks you do well. Discuss what skills are required for those activities and how you can use those skills to succeed in your academic career.

Wk 1 Complete

From the Author
After graduating high school, I matriculated to junior college. I was inexperienced and naïve. I had questions, fears, and uncertainties about my ability to achieve my goal: my college degree. No one was available to help me or answer my questions, but then again, I didn’t know what questions to ask or how to begin my college education. But I knew that I was in the right place at the right time for all the right reasons to start on my new path to personal and professional success—just like you are now.
Congratulations—and welcome (back) to college! Whatever your reasons for returning to school, you have chosen to expand your horizons, alter your perceptions, and take control of your life. You’ve made a courageous choice to begin or return to college.
I’m sure there are many reasons you enrolled in college: complete something you started long ago; be a role model for your children; learn new skills to advance in your career or change careers altogether; build and/or gain self-confidence; provide financial security for yourself and family; and countless other motivations. All your reasons for enrolling in college are investments—investments in yourself,

your family, and your future.

Below are questions you can ask yourself to gain a clearer picture of why you want to invest in your future—ideas and suggestions about why college is the right choice for you. The clearer you are about your goals, the more focused and directed you’ll be. And the more focused and directed you are, the more likely you can achieve success.

Questions to Ask Yourself
What Do I Want to Gain from College?
• Explore new possibilities and ideas: Your life experiences are vast and comprehensive. You’ve developed ideas based on what you’ve learned throughout your life. Perhaps, though, this knowledge has be- come limited and fixed. Perhaps you now seek new information to complement what you already know. Perhaps you want to discover and explore new ideas to incorporate them into your life. Perhaps you want to widen the realm of what’s possible for you. College can offer you new opportunities to learn, expand, and grow to make new choices to affect your future in positive ways.
• Increase knowledge: There is always room to learn. You already know much, but you now want to add to that knowledge by increasing your understanding of the world around you. Knowledge is power, and col- lege can offer you the opportunity to heighten and use that power to your advantage.
• Learn new skills or improve existing skills: College will teach you new skills—skills you can use and apply to your career. Whether you want to increase your skills on your present job to advance or learn new ones for your new career, college can offer you the chance to broaden your current skill level to make you more desirable in the job market.

What Goals Have I Set for Myself?
• Earn a college degree: You enrolled in college to get your degree/certificate. You set goals for yourself. Earning a college degree implies the desire for personal accomplishment, fulfillment, and attainment of those goals. College offers you the chance to realize your dreams.
• Complete something you started but never finished: Completing a goal is satisfying. Whether the goal is a small or big one, seeing it through to its end is not only personally rewarding but also builds self-confidence in completing what you set out to do. The fact that you finish what you started tells you that you have tenacity and strength. College offers you the opportunity to build on these characteristics.
Why Did I Come to College?
• To be a role model for your children: Children learn what they see and hear. All children need a genuine and strong model to follow. Establishing goals, seeing them through, and practicing effective college skills demonstrate to your children that not only can you achieve success, but they can too. College can help you to create effective behaviors and communication for your children to follow.

• To increase your income and employment opportunities: Global competition in the job market is keen and real. Certainly, work experiences count, but a college degree improves your chances of more career options and opportunities, which can result in higher wages.
• To advance in your current career: To advance these days, employers can require a college degree. Despite the number of years you’ve been employed in your current position, if you want to advance, college degrees are imperative. Your choice to enroll in college and achieve your degree will help you move into administration or supervision—if you choose to do so.
• To change your life: There is no reason for anyone to be dissatisfied with life. We can always improve the quality of our lives by making new and more effective choices. What you learn in college will give you the chance to expand the possibilities for new choices for a better and changed life.

How Will My Life Change, and What Can I Expect in College?
• Financial constraints: All college students—and especially adult learners—feel the effects of college on their finances. While they may continue to make the same salary on the job as they always did, their expenses usually become more strained. Repaying student loans can drain finances, but the long-term goal of achieving a college degree is well worth the short-term financial constraints.
• Time limitations: How you spent your time before college and during college will be different. To achieve your degree, you must study and go to class or seminars, both of which take time and effort. Your available time is at a premium and must now be used wisely; however, using the time management techniques in this book teaches you how to organize your time efficiently and effectively, both in college and your future.
• Increased self-confidence: With each small victory of completing assignments or achieving high grades on a test, your confidence grows. Each accomplishment signals personal achievement reflected in a stronger sense of self. And college will give you many opportunities to increase your self-confidence.
• Challenges: Naturally, college will present challenges—and probably lots of them: how to handle stress and pressure; how to manage many responsibilities at once; how to study effectively; and how to meet personal and professional responsibilities. These challenges will test your current skills and knowledge, but college can give you the techniques to deal with and learn from them. You can see the challenges you face in college as obstacles or opportunities to make new and more effective choices to lead to success.

What Does It Take to Succeed in College?
• Diligence: Despite all odds, persevere—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Tenacity: Even when you feel you can’t write another paper, read another chapter, or listen to another lecture, be vigilant—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Commitment: Make a pledge to yourself to finish what you started— don’t give up!
• Motivation: Never ever forget why you came to college in the first place—why you made the choice—for all the right reasons, for yourself, and for your family. Stay engaged—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Courage: Enrolling in college is an act of bravery. Your choice is one of courage, which is obviously part of your character. Keep going—don’t give up!
College Fears and Truths
It is very natural to have some trepidation about college. Not knowing what will happen if goals are not realized produces a certain amount of fear. Con- sider, though, that fears about college are based on the unknown. Consider that the trepidation you may feel now is really a lack of information more than anything else. Quite simply, you don’t know what will happen in col- lege. Gaining knowledge about anything—whether driving a car for the first time or the first day on a new job—college is much the same; the first time is always scary when we don’t know what will happen.
Not having information not only creates fear but also projections. When we don’t know what will happen, we imagine what could happen. The dis- parities between college fact and fiction, truth and reality, can sometimes overwhelm to the point of inertia. One way to deal with and manage typical college fears is to increase your knowledge and inform yourself of the truths about college. This text gives you the techniques and skills you need to deal with and manage the fears you may be experiencing.
College Fears
It is natural to feel some trepidation about college. For example:
• Lacking abilities to learn new information: Learning new information is challenging academically and professionally. To incorporate knowledge into your life requires a new way of thinking. Chapter 2 focuses on how you can use your life experiences in college and how what you already know supports what you will know. Seeing the relationship between life experiences and college helps you to understand just how your life experiences contribute to your college education.

• Meeting financial and college responsibilities: With college comes pressure, and with pressure comes stress. Chapter 3 gives you practical and new ways to handle and manage the stress associated with financial considerations and college life. Learning new skills to reduce stress makes your college experience easier and more satisfying.
• Managing your time: There’s no doubt your schedule is already full with work and family, not to mention the need for personal time. And now, with college, your time is a more precious commodity. Chapter 4 teaches you practical and beneficial ways to combine and incorporate all your responsibilities and obligations within a timeframe. By learning the techniques of time management, you can accomplish all you need/want to.
• Feeling isolated: You are entering a whole new ballgame when you come to college: new people, new responsibilities, new requirements, new skills, new everything. It may feel a little scary for you, but it does to everyone else too. You may feel isolated, but you’re not alone. Chapter 5 tells you how to seek help and support from others to make stronger connections with others while you’re in college. You’ll be sur- prised how willing people are to provide you with the help you need to achieve your goal.
• Thinking critically: If the quality of a person’s thinking is the single most significant determining factor of both their happiness and their success, why not discover the tools that the best thinkers use and take the time to learn to use them yourself? Chapter 6 gives you specific problem-solving techniques you can implement in school and your personal/professional life.
• Listening and taking notes: Effective class skills are imperative for college success. To do well in school, you must be able to actively listen and take notes. In Chapter 7, you learn how to listen, how to take good notes, and how to get the most out of class.
• Studying: Maybe it’s been a while since you devoted time to reading chapters in a text, taking notes, and memorizing information. Effective studying is about adopting a plan and developing a system to under- stand new information. Chapter 8 gives you all the tools you need to improve your studying techniques to achieve the grades you need to succeed.
• Taking tests: It has probably been a while since you took a formal test, so having a little fear is understandable. Fortunately, Chapter 9 helps you learn some basics about how to study for and takes tests. You will also learn how to overcome test anxiety.
• Writing papers: Sure, you feel uncertain about your abilities to write a paper, much less a 15-page research paper. But most new college students feel the same. You don’t have to struggle or feel helpless. Chapter 10 gives you all the techniques you need to write a good paper. And there is always the writing lab in your school to help you.
College Truths
While college fears are very real, so are college truths. Perhaps recognizing them can help you redirect whatever trepidation you might be feeling about college. Consider these facts:
Your Life Will Change in College: Change is a fact of life. Change is like dominoes: One change creates another to create another and so on. While you’re in college, you can expect your life to be different than what it was. You will find yourself needing to make different choices to handle your responsibilities: school, work, and family. Finding balance through flexibility helps to deal with all these inevitable changes. And change can produce positive results.
• There will be unknowns in college: Life is full of unknowns. You don’t know what you’ll find in your mailbox tomorrow or what will happen on the way to work. And you don’t know what will happen in college. Accepting the unknown as a fact of life is actually a known; you know there are always unknowns. With the knowing comes growth and expansion—new ways of thinking and new ideas—some of the very reasons you came to college in the first place.
• Obstacles Will Arise in College: Like change and the unknown, obstacles are a fact of life, but you have dealt with obstacles many times. With each obstacle, you gain knowledge. If you consider obstacles as opportunities to learn rather than roadblocks on your path, you learn new lessons—both in college and in life. College can present many obstacles, so see them as a means to learn more effective problem-solving techniques.
• You will need to make sacrifices in college: To get your college degree, compromises have to be made; you have to give up something to get something: your degree, a better job, a new career, financial stability, increased self-confidence, and more. A new commitment requires discipline and sacrifice. But sacrifice now is gain later.
• You can succeed in college: The truth is, you can succeed. You can get your college degree to get a better job to make the kind of salary you want to provide security for yourself and your family. Your enrolling in college implies you are committed to this process to make your dream a reality. You already have the capability to succeed—you’ve have done it many times—and with each success, you become a stronger, more accomplished, powerful person. The truth about college is that it is hard. But your life experiences may also have been difficult and challenging, and you have dealt with them successfully. The information in this textbook gives you the techniques to learn new skills to reach your goals. You’ve succeeded before; you can succeed now.

Companion Strategies for College Success
• Write down the following formula and then put it in a visible place: To achieve success, I have to
• attend classes + • listen and take notes + • study + • turn in assignments on time + • write papers and take tests + • pass the classes = • a college degree + increased financial gain. It’s all good.
• Meet the challenge: working daily, being with family, financial considerations, so prioritize, prioritize, prioritize! What is more important: having fun with friends, hanging around watching TV, or spending your valuable precious time preparing for your future? Use your time wisely! For example, instead of watching football for four hours on a Sunday afternoon, tape it and then watch it for a little while when you want a break from studying.
• Be a professional. Professional communication and behavior are con- scious choices you make. Practicing these behaviors as you enter college is a skill employers value. Start now to build your employable skills.
• Make valid choices. Life is made up of choices, and we are the product of those choices, so make good ones! How? Write down in ink what you really want (prestige, privilege, increased financial gain). Then, prioritize those choices/desires and decide which steps you will take first, then next, and so on. For example: “I want to make more money to support my family. To do that, I need to make good choices that will further that goal, and those choices include going to class, doing the work, and achieving the degree.”
• Ask for help if you need it. • Stay healthy. Eat nutritious foods to give you the stamina you need to
complete what you need to.
• Believe in yourself.
• Know that you can achieve your degree and succeed. You are more than capable of completing your goal—you’ve done it before, so you can do it again. Believe that, know that—daily, moment by moment. Give yourself daily affirmations such as, “I have the ability to get my degree. I am smart enough to get my degree. I will get my degree— absolutely no doubt about it!”

Summary
Your choice to come to college to get your degree is truly admirable. You have the courage to take a new step on your path to success. That step proves you want a better life for yourself and your family. You’re willing to make sacrifices to achieve what you want. This book provides you with concrete, practical techniques to help you achieve that goal. Use it. Commit the principles and ideas to memory. With the information in this book and your dedication and desire to achieve your goals, you can be the success you want to be.
Best and Worst Practices
BEST
■ Visualize yourself in a great job, making a high salary, giving yourself and your family financial security as a success!
■ Face your fears about college. The more effectively you deal with and manage fear, the less powerful it becomes.
■ Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t.

■ Recognize and celebrate what you already know and how that knowl-
edge will work for you in college.
■ See college as the opportunity to learn new skills to use in a new career and life.

WORST
■ Focus on what you don’t know rather than what you do.
■ Hold on to whatever fears you feel about college.
■ Find reasons not to do what’s expected of you in college: write papers, study, take tests, attend classes, complete assignments, and the like.
■ Forget the reasons why you came to college in the first place. ■ See college obstacles as roadblocks rather than opportunities to learn.

Assignment
Write a personal letter of 200–300 words to anyone you want: fictional or real, historical or current, animated or human. For example, you can write a letter to your spouse or Abraham Lincoln or Bullwinkle or Magic Johnson or Barbie or Stephen King or Indiana Jones or your children or Superman or Oprah Winfrey or anyone you like.
Tell the reader your feelings about enrolling in college: your expectations, fears, and any other feelings you have about college life. Be specific. Pay attention to spelling and grammar.
The letter must begin this way: Dear I have great news—I just started college! I know you’ll understand
when I say …

Chapter 2
The Life Experience, College, and Career Relationship
From the Author
During my early college career, I compartmentalized everything—work, family, school. Each area fit into a nice, neat category, and I worked very hard to keep them separate and tidy. I finally realized that everything is connected. Life experiences are not separate from college, and college is not separate from work—each relates to the other. You can practice in school and on the job those lessons that you’ve learned in life. Use the skills life has taught you—everything relates to everything.

What Life Has Taught You
If you think about it, you’ll see just how much you really do know, what you’ve learned throughout the course of your life, and how this information can be used in many ways.
CHAPTER HIGHLIGHTS
• What Life Has Taught You

• Apply What You Already Know to College and career
• Develop and Expand What You Already Know to College and Career
• Strategies to Integrate Life Experiences, College, and Career Knowledge

For example, you already know how to
• Communicate: You know how to communicate. You talk to people all the time. You interviewed for a job and were hired. Obviously, you know how to communicate with people to get what you want.
• Create and maintain relationships: You know how to relate to those close to you. You can’t maintain a close relationship with others if you don’t know how to relate to them! You know the value of close relationships—your spouse, your friends, your children, your relatives— and you know that being with others enhances the quality of life.
• Handle responsibilities: You know how to meet obligations and complete what you need to—both with your family and in the workplace. You know how to meet expectations in a timely way. You know the significance of money and the responsibilities of fiscal management.
• Learn new information: You know how to approach new information, to read, to study, to absorb, and to practice. You learned how to drive, how to shave, how to tie your shoes, how to read instructions. If we don’t know how to do something, we learn—and you learned how.
• Achieve your goal: You know what it takes to achieve goals: tenacity, dedication, commitment, and clear focus. You’ve set many goals for your- self and have worked very hard to achieve them—you know what it takes!
Skills
In addition to having knowledge, you’ve learned many skills in your life- time, including:
• Technical: You are skilled on the computer, spending time with video games, searching, accessing, and researching information on the Internet, and perhaps even creating websites. You also have specific job-related skills: medical, legal, automotive, administrative, supervisory—to name but a few. Whatever your need for information or technical skills on the job, you already possess specific skills you need to meet your responsibilities.
• Communication: You’re able to communicate both verbally and in writing—both valuable skills you’ve learned. You e-mail, blog, use Facebook and/or Twitter—all written communication skills. Perhaps you write reports or proposals. You’re skilled at exchanging ideas with spouses, children, coworkers, bosses, and friends. Whomever you communicate with, you have the skills to do so successfully.
• Organizational: You’ve developed these skills over a lifetime of experiences—through time and financial management. To meet responsibilities, you’ve learned to organize and structure ways to complete what you need to. Organizational skills are a part of your daily life.

Wisdom
Wisdom is acquired by learning and practice, not age. Your life experiences and the lessons you’ve learned have created the moral code by which you live. Your wisdom promotes an ethical code of high standards. And the wisdom you possess dictates the choices you make.

Apply What You Already Know to College and career
As a new student, you may be overlooking the relationships between what you already know and how that information can work for you in college and your career. To feel more confident and self-assured in the college/career process, think about what you already know, what you can do, and who you are rather than what you don’t know, what you can’t do, and who you think you should be. You already have the knowledge, you already have skills, and you already possess the wisdom you need to succeed in school and on the job. How does what you know apply to school and your career? How can you use and apply your life experiences to college and your career?
Knowledge
• Communication: You know how to communicate with others. You interviewed to get into college and were accepted. You spoke with your advisor to get all the information you needed. In your career, you can use your communication knowledge and experience to get the job you want or with coworkers and bosses to advance. You already know how to communicate, so you understand how to succeed in school and at work!
• Create and maintain relationships: You know how to develop relationships. You know how to relate to those close to you. You know how people can enhance the quality of your life. The same is true of school and a career. In college, you can develop and maintain relation- ships with your peers, instructors, and administrators who can help you through the college process. In the workplace, you can create strong relationships with people you spend at least eight hours a day with. And this knowledge is a significant part of working in groups both in college and in the workplace.
• Handle responsibilities: You know how to be responsible with your personal obligations. You know how to meet expectations in a timely way. You can apply this same knowledge to college by being a responsible student with a strong purpose. And in your career, you meet the necessities of the job because you know how to.
• Learn new information: You know how to learn—you’ve done it all your life. Certainly, learning new information is a major part of the college experience, but you already know how to learn. You apply the same methodologies you have already learned to college and career: you listen, analyze, apply, comprehend, know, and evaluate. Learning new tasks—for example, on the job—is what you had to do and now know how to do.
• Achieve your goal: You know what it takes to achieve goals. Wanting a college degree is a major goal. You’ve set many goals for yourself and
have worked very hard to achieve them. On the job, your goal might be a supervisory position. You apply the same tenacity, dedication, commitment, and clear focus you’ve always used to achieve what you want. You know what it takes—keeping your eye on the prize.
Skills
• Technical: How can you use your current technical skills: — researching topics on the Internet; writing and formatting papers on the computer; applying medical, legal, or other job-related skills—to class assignments and in your career? All skills you currently have can be useful and applied to college and your career.
• Communication: Your current writing skills will serve you well in col- lege and your career by your ability to compose papers. Additionally, you communicate with others and can apply those same skills to con- versing with your peers, instructors, and anyone else you come in contact with in college and your career.
• Organizational: Your life experiences have taught you to structure your time to meet deadlines. This skill is critical in college and in the workplace, for you’ll have to complete assignments at specific times. Additionally, you can use these already-practiced skills in such classes as math and English by using a formulaic approach as a way to organize ideas to answer math questions and writing papers. You’ve already developed these skills and know how to structure and organize your time to meet your obligations and responsibilities. Organizational skills are a part of your daily life, and now you can use them in school.
Wisdom
The wisdom you’ve gained over the years can certainly be applied to college and the workplace. The moral code by which you live dictates how you meet what is expected of you. In college, you’re expected to write your own papers and not plagiarize. In college, you’re expected to submit work when it’s due—not make excuses for not doing the work. In college and the workplace, you’re expected to accept responsibility for your actions, which—as an adult learner—you already know how to do.
Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third-party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.
What Is Can Be
The knowledge, skills, and wisdom you possess will guide and support you in college and in the workplace. However, this information may be a bit rusty. You now have the opportunity to use and develop your current insight and expertise in college to successfully complete your goals.

Develop and Expand What You Already Know
While you’ve gained knowledge, skills, and wisdom from your own life experiences, there is always room to experiment, grow, change, develop, improve, and practice—and college is the ideal place to do it. How fortunate you are to have an opportunity to expand on what knowledge, skills, and wisdom you already possess. To increase your current knowledge, skill level, and wisdom, take full advantage of the college experience to succeed in the career you’ve chosen.
Develop Your Communication Skills
Verbal Skills
• Improve your vocabulary: When an employer asks you specific questions, he or she wants specific answers. For example, if you respond to “Where do you see yourself in five years” with “Gee, I dunno—maybe working,” you’re demonstrating a limited vocabulary. Increasing your vocabulary gives you access to words to express yourself articulately and succinctly. Words have power, and by increasing your language capabilities, you demonstrate that power. While you’re in college, start to build your storehouse of words to use in your career.
• Eliminate slang, clichés, and colloquialisms: Language is dynamic; it changes constantly. In the workplace, contemporary words and phrases are inappropriate. Make the effort in college to begin speaking like a professional.
• Use nonsexist and culturally sensitive language: In business, you don’t want to offend anyone with your vocabulary. Our world is wonderfully diverse, which requires an awareness and sensitivity of cultural differences. Avoid sexist terminology.
• Be specific: To get what you want, articulate what your needs are so the listener understands you. To avoid any confusion or misunderstanding, use precise language that reflects your exact meaning. The more specific you are, the more likely you are to get what you want. Take advantage of conversations with your college peers and teachers to develop and practice this skill.
• Take advantage of all public speaking classes: The thought of speaking in front of a class may invoke fear, but the experiences and skills you learn are invaluable to personal success. Many careers will require you to stand in front of your peers, coworkers, or supervisors and speak. While the thought of speaking in public may frighten you, it can also allow you the opportunity to develop those skills that you will
use in your career. Be aware that most employers consider effective public speaking skills an integral component of advancement, so be courageous and stand up in front of your speech class!
Writing Skills
• Participate fully in all English classes: English courses are a college requirement. To develop your current writing skills, participate fully in class, complete all assignments, and learn all you can about effective writing skills. Consider English classes as a means to self-improvement—a sort of insurance policy you can cash in on later.
Develop Your Critical Thinking Abilities
• Rely on your own abilities to solve problems: You know how to solve problems. There are times when you need help from others to resolve problems you may face, but most times, your life experiences can be the basis for problem-solving. Whatever and whenever problems arise in college, make attempts to solve them on your own first, and if you can’t, then seek the help of others.
• Develop and improve critical thinking skills in all facets of life: You use critical thinking every day in managing your life. From assembling your children’s toys to organizing and completing responsibilities, you analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information to make effective choices. In college, you can further develop these skills to meet dead- lines and complete work-related tasks.
• Be a team player: You know how to work with others, which is one of the most significant college and workplace skills. In study groups, you can expand these skills, which are valuable in the workplace.
Open Your Heart and Mind to New Ideas and Possibilities
• Question what you know, what you think you know, and what you hear: Questioning doesn’t mean you doubt what you hear, think, or know. In fact, it means the opposite. Questioning is a way to discover the truth so you can make more informed choices. Making more informed choices increases your current knowledge and critical thinking skills.
• Open your mind: We all have opinions; we believe we’re right (and others wrong) about many things. College gives you the opportunity to learn to open your mind to accept different opinions, ideas, a

Wk 1 Complete

From the Author
After graduating high school, I matriculated to junior college. I was inexperienced and naïve. I had questions, fears, and uncertainties about my ability to achieve my goal: my college degree. No one was available to help me or answer my questions, but then again, I didn’t know what questions to ask or how to begin my college education. But I knew that I was in the right place at the right time for all the right reasons to start on my new path to personal and professional success—just like you are now.
Congratulations—and welcome (back) to college! Whatever your reasons for returning to school, you have chosen to expand your horizons, alter your perceptions, and take control of your life. You’ve made a courageous choice to begin or return to college.
I’m sure there are many reasons you enrolled in college: complete something you started long ago; be a role model for your children; learn new skills to advance in your career or change careers altogether; build and/or gain self-confidence; provide financial security for yourself and family; and countless other motivations. All your reasons for enrolling in college are investments—investments in yourself,

your family, and your future.

Below are questions you can ask yourself to gain a clearer picture of why you want to invest in your future—ideas and suggestions about why college is the right choice for you. The clearer you are about your goals, the more focused and directed you’ll be. And the more focused and directed you are, the more likely you can achieve success.

Questions to Ask Yourself
What Do I Want to Gain from College?
• Explore new possibilities and ideas: Your life experiences are vast and comprehensive. You’ve developed ideas based on what you’ve learned throughout your life. Perhaps, though, this knowledge has be- come limited and fixed. Perhaps you now seek new information to complement what you already know. Perhaps you want to discover and explore new ideas to incorporate them into your life. Perhaps you want to widen the realm of what’s possible for you. College can offer you new opportunities to learn, expand, and grow to make new choices to affect your future in positive ways.
• Increase knowledge: There is always room to learn. You already know much, but you now want to add to that knowledge by increasing your understanding of the world around you. Knowledge is power, and col- lege can offer you the opportunity to heighten and use that power to your advantage.
• Learn new skills or improve existing skills: College will teach you new skills—skills you can use and apply to your career. Whether you want to increase your skills on your present job to advance or learn new ones for your new career, college can offer you the chance to broaden your current skill level to make you more desirable in the job market.

What Goals Have I Set for Myself?
• Earn a college degree: You enrolled in college to get your degree/certificate. You set goals for yourself. Earning a college degree implies the desire for personal accomplishment, fulfillment, and attainment of those goals. College offers you the chance to realize your dreams.
• Complete something you started but never finished: Completing a goal is satisfying. Whether the goal is a small or big one, seeing it through to its end is not only personally rewarding but also builds self-confidence in completing what you set out to do. The fact that you finish what you started tells you that you have tenacity and strength. College offers you the opportunity to build on these characteristics.
Why Did I Come to College?
• To be a role model for your children: Children learn what they see and hear. All children need a genuine and strong model to follow. Establishing goals, seeing them through, and practicing effective college skills demonstrate to your children that not only can you achieve success, but they can too. College can help you to create effective behaviors and communication for your children to follow.

• To increase your income and employment opportunities: Global competition in the job market is keen and real. Certainly, work experiences count, but a college degree improves your chances of more career options and opportunities, which can result in higher wages.
• To advance in your current career: To advance these days, employers can require a college degree. Despite the number of years you’ve been employed in your current position, if you want to advance, college degrees are imperative. Your choice to enroll in college and achieve your degree will help you move into administration or supervision—if you choose to do so.
• To change your life: There is no reason for anyone to be dissatisfied with life. We can always improve the quality of our lives by making new and more effective choices. What you learn in college will give you the chance to expand the possibilities for new choices for a better and changed life.

How Will My Life Change, and What Can I Expect in College?
• Financial constraints: All college students—and especially adult learners—feel the effects of college on their finances. While they may continue to make the same salary on the job as they always did, their expenses usually become more strained. Repaying student loans can drain finances, but the long-term goal of achieving a college degree is well worth the short-term financial constraints.
• Time limitations: How you spent your time before college and during college will be different. To achieve your degree, you must study and go to class or seminars, both of which take time and effort. Your available time is at a premium and must now be used wisely; however, using the time management techniques in this book teaches you how to organize your time efficiently and effectively, both in college and your future.
• Increased self-confidence: With each small victory of completing assignments or achieving high grades on a test, your confidence grows. Each accomplishment signals personal achievement reflected in a stronger sense of self. And college will give you many opportunities to increase your self-confidence.
• Challenges: Naturally, college will present challenges—and probably lots of them: how to handle stress and pressure; how to manage many responsibilities at once; how to study effectively; and how to meet personal and professional responsibilities. These challenges will test your current skills and knowledge, but college can give you the techniques to deal with and learn from them. You can see the challenges you face in college as obstacles or opportunities to make new and more effective choices to lead to success.

What Does It Take to Succeed in College?
• Diligence: Despite all odds, persevere—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Tenacity: Even when you feel you can’t write another paper, read another chapter, or listen to another lecture, be vigilant—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Commitment: Make a pledge to yourself to finish what you started— don’t give up!
• Motivation: Never ever forget why you came to college in the first place—why you made the choice—for all the right reasons, for yourself, and for your family. Stay engaged—keep going. Don’t give up!
• Courage: Enrolling in college is an act of bravery. Your choice is one of courage, which is obviously part of your character. Keep going—don’t give up!
College Fears and Truths
It is very natural to have some trepidation about college. Not knowing what will happen if goals are not realized produces a certain amount of fear. Con- sider, though, that fears about college are based on the unknown. Consider that the trepidation you may feel now is really a lack of information more than anything else. Quite simply, you don’t know what will happen in col- lege. Gaining knowledge about anything—whether driving a car for the first time or the first day on a new job—college is much the same; the first time is always scary when we don’t know what will happen.
Not having information not only creates fear but also projections. When we don’t know what will happen, we imagine what could happen. The dis- parities between college fact and fiction, truth and reality, can sometimes overwhelm to the point of inertia. One way to deal with and manage typical college fears is to increase your knowledge and inform yourself of the truths about college. This text gives you the techniques and skills you need to deal with and manage the fears you may be experiencing.
College Fears
It is natural to feel some trepidation about college. For example:
• Lacking abilities to learn new information: Learning new information is challenging academically and professionally. To incorporate knowledge into your life requires a new way of thinking. Chapter 2 focuses on how you can use your life experiences in college and how what you already know supports what you will know. Seeing the relationship between life experiences and college helps you to understand just how your life experiences contribute to your college education.

• Meeting financial and college responsibilities: With college comes pressure, and with pressure comes stress. Chapter 3 gives you practical and new ways to handle and manage the stress associated with financial considerations and college life. Learning new skills to reduce stress makes your college experience easier and more satisfying.
• Managing your time: There’s no doubt your schedule is already full with work and family, not to mention the need for personal time. And now, with college, your time is a more precious commodity. Chapter 4 teaches you practical and beneficial ways to combine and incorporate all your responsibilities and obligations within a timeframe. By learning the techniques of time management, you can accomplish all you need/want to.
• Feeling isolated: You are entering a whole new ballgame when you come to college: new people, new responsibilities, new requirements, new skills, new everything. It may feel a little scary for you, but it does to everyone else too. You may feel isolated, but you’re not alone. Chapter 5 tells you how to seek help and support from others to make stronger connections with others while you’re in college. You’ll be sur- prised how willing people are to provide you with the help you need to achieve your goal.
• Thinking critically: If the quality of a person’s thinking is the single most significant determining factor of both their happiness and their success, why not discover the tools that the best thinkers use and take the time to learn to use them yourself? Chapter 6 gives you specific problem-solving techniques you can implement in school and your personal/professional life.
• Listening and taking notes: Effective class skills are imperative for college success. To do well in school, you must be able to actively listen and take notes. In Chapter 7, you learn how to listen, how to take good notes, and how to get the most out of class.
• Studying: Maybe it’s been a while since you devoted time to reading chapters in a text, taking notes, and memorizing information. Effective studying is about adopting a plan and developing a system to under- stand new information. Chapter 8 gives you all the tools you need to improve your studying techniques to achieve the grades you need to succeed.
• Taking tests: It has probably been a while since you took a formal test, so having a little fear is understandable. Fortunately, Chapter 9 helps you learn some basics about how to study for and takes tests. You will also learn how to overcome test anxiety.
• Writing papers: Sure, you feel uncertain about your abilities to write a paper, much less a 15-page research paper. But most new college students feel the same. You don’t have to struggle or feel helpless. Chapter 10 gives you all the techniques you need to write a good paper. And there is always the writing lab in your school to help you.
College Truths
While college fears are very real, so are college truths. Perhaps recognizing them can help you redirect whatever trepidation you might be feeling about college. Consider these facts:
Your Life Will Change in College: Change is a fact of life. Change is like dominoes: One change creates another to create another and so on. While you’re in college, you can expect your life to be different than what it was. You will find yourself needing to make different choices to handle your responsibilities: school, work, and family. Finding balance through flexibility helps to deal with all these inevitable changes. And change can produce positive results.
• There will be unknowns in college: Life is full of unknowns. You don’t know what you’ll find in your mailbox tomorrow or what will happen on the way to work. And you don’t know what will happen in college. Accepting the unknown as a fact of life is actually a known; you know there are always unknowns. With the knowing comes growth and expansion—new ways of thinking and new ideas—some of the very reasons you came to college in the first place.
• Obstacles Will Arise in College: Like change and the unknown, obstacles are a fact of life, but you have dealt with obstacles many times. With each obstacle, you gain knowledge. If you consider obstacles as opportunities to learn rather than roadblocks on your path, you learn new lessons—both in college and in life. College can present many obstacles, so see them as a means to learn more effective problem-solving techniques.
• You will need to make sacrifices in college: To get your college degree, compromises have to be made; you have to give up something to get something: your degree, a better job, a new career, financial stability, increased self-confidence, and more. A new commitment requires discipline and sacrifice. But sacrifice now is gain later.
• You can succeed in college: The truth is, you can succeed. You can get your college degree to get a better job to make the kind of salary you want to provide security for yourself and your family. Your enrolling in college implies you are committed to this process to make your dream a reality. You already have the capability to succeed—you’ve have done it many times—and with each success, you become a stronger, more accomplished, powerful person. The truth about college is that it is hard. But your life experiences may also have been difficult and challenging, and you have dealt with them successfully. The information in this textbook gives you the techniques to learn new skills to reach your goals. You’ve succeeded before; you can succeed now.

Companion Strategies for College Success
• Write down the following formula and then put it in a visible place: To achieve success, I have to
• attend classes + • listen and take notes + • study + • turn in assignments on time + • write papers and take tests + • pass the classes = • a college degree + increased financial gain. It’s all good.
• Meet the challenge: working daily, being with family, financial considerations, so prioritize, prioritize, prioritize! What is more important: having fun with friends, hanging around watching TV, or spending your valuable precious time preparing for your future? Use your time wisely! For example, instead of watching football for four hours on a Sunday afternoon, tape it and then watch it for a little while when you want a break from studying.
• Be a professional. Professional communication and behavior are con- scious choices you make. Practicing these behaviors as you enter college is a skill employers value. Start now to build your employable skills.
• Make valid choices. Life is made up of choices, and we are the product of those choices, so make good ones! How? Write down in ink what you really want (prestige, privilege, increased financial gain). Then, prioritize those choices/desires and decide which steps you will take first, then next, and so on. For example: “I want to make more money to support my family. To do that, I need to make good choices that will further that goal, and those choices include going to class, doing the work, and achieving the degree.”
• Ask for help if you need it. • Stay healthy. Eat nutritious foods to give you the stamina you need to
complete what you need to.
• Believe in yourself.
• Know that you can achieve your degree and succeed. You are more than capable of completing your goal—you’ve done it before, so you can do it again. Believe that, know that—daily, moment by moment. Give yourself daily affirmations such as, “I have the ability to get my degree. I am smart enough to get my degree. I will get my degree— absolutely no doubt about it!”

Summary
Your choice to come to college to get your degree is truly admirable. You have the courage to take a new step on your path to success. That step proves you want a better life for yourself and your family. You’re willing to make sacrifices to achieve what you want. This book provides you with concrete, practical techniques to help you achieve that goal. Use it. Commit the principles and ideas to memory. With the information in this book and your dedication and desire to achieve your goals, you can be the success you want to be.
Best and Worst Practices
BEST
■ Visualize yourself in a great job, making a high salary, giving yourself and your family financial security as a success!
■ Face your fears about college. The more effectively you deal with and manage fear, the less powerful it becomes.
■ Focus on what you can do, not what you can’t.

■ Recognize and celebrate what you already know and how that knowl-
edge will work for you in college.
■ See college as the opportunity to learn new skills to use in a new career and life.

WORST
■ Focus on what you don’t know rather than what you do.
■ Hold on to whatever fears you feel about college.
■ Find reasons not to do what’s expected of you in college: write papers, study, take tests, attend classes, complete assignments, and the like.
■ Forget the reasons why you came to college in the first place. ■ See college obstacles as roadblocks rather than opportunities to learn.

Assignment
Write a personal letter of 200–300 words to anyone you want: fictional or real, historical or current, animated or human. For example, you can write a letter to your spouse or Abraham Lincoln or Bullwinkle or Magic Johnson or Barbie or Stephen King or Indiana Jones or your children or Superman or Oprah Winfrey or anyone you like.
Tell the reader your feelings about enrolling in college: your expectations, fears, and any other feelings you have about college life. Be specific. Pay attention to spelling and grammar.
The letter must begin this way: Dear I have great news—I just started college! I know you’ll understand
when I say …

Chapter 2
The Life Experience, College, and Career Relationship
From the Author
During my early college career, I compartmentalized everything—work, family, school. Each area fit into a nice, neat category, and I worked very hard to keep them separate and tidy. I finally realized that everything is connected. Life experiences are not separate from college, and college is not separate from work—each relates to the other. You can practice in school and on the job those lessons that you’ve learned in life. Use the skills life has taught you—everything relates to everything.

What Life Has Taught You
If you think about it, you’ll see just how much you really do know, what you’ve learned throughout the course of your life, and how this information can be used in many ways.
CHAPTER HIGHLIGHTS
• What Life Has Taught You

• Apply What You Already Know to College and career
• Develop and Expand What You Already Know to College and Career
• Strategies to Integrate Life Experiences, College, and Career Knowledge

For example, you already know how to
• Communicate: You know how to communicate. You talk to people all the time. You interviewed for a job and were hired. Obviously, you know how to communicate with people to get what you want.
• Create and maintain relationships: You know how to relate to those close to you. You can’t maintain a close relationship with others if you don’t know how to relate to them! You know the value of close relationships—your spouse, your friends, your children, your relatives— and you know that being with others enhances the quality of life.
• Handle responsibilities: You know how to meet obligations and complete what you need to—both with your family and in the workplace. You know how to meet expectations in a timely way. You know the significance of money and the responsibilities of fiscal management.
• Learn new information: You know how to approach new information, to read, to study, to absorb, and to practice. You learned how to drive, how to shave, how to tie your shoes, how to read instructions. If we don’t know how to do something, we learn—and you learned how.
• Achieve your goal: You know what it takes to achieve goals: tenacity, dedication, commitment, and clear focus. You’ve set many goals for your- self and have worked very hard to achieve them—you know what it takes!
Skills
In addition to having knowledge, you’ve learned many skills in your life- time, including:
• Technical: You are skilled on the computer, spending time with video games, searching, accessing, and researching information on the Internet, and perhaps even creating websites. You also have specific job-related skills: medical, legal, automotive, administrative, supervisory—to name but a few. Whatever your need for information or technical skills on the job, you already possess specific skills you need to meet your responsibilities.
• Communication: You’re able to communicate both verbally and in writing—both valuable skills you’ve learned. You e-mail, blog, use Facebook and/or Twitter—all written communication skills. Perhaps you write reports or proposals. You’re skilled at exchanging ideas with spouses, children, coworkers, bosses, and friends. Whomever you communicate with, you have the skills to do so successfully.
• Organizational: You’ve developed these skills over a lifetime of experiences—through time and financial management. To meet responsibilities, you’ve learned to organize and structure ways to complete what you need to. Organizational skills are a part of your daily life.

Wisdom
Wisdom is acquired by learning and practice, not age. Your life experiences and the lessons you’ve learned have created the moral code by which you live. Your wisdom promotes an ethical code of high standards. And the wisdom you possess dictates the choices you make.

Apply What You Already Know to College and career
As a new student, you may be overlooking the relationships between what you already know and how that information can work for you in college and your career. To feel more confident and self-assured in the college/career process, think about what you already know, what you can do, and who you are rather than what you don’t know, what you can’t do, and who you think you should be. You already have the knowledge, you already have skills, and you already possess the wisdom you need to succeed in school and on the job. How does what you know apply to school and your career? How can you use and apply your life experiences to college and your career?
Knowledge
• Communication: You know how to communicate with others. You interviewed to get into college and were accepted. You spoke with your advisor to get all the information you needed. In your career, you can use your communication knowledge and experience to get the job you want or with coworkers and bosses to advance. You already know how to communicate, so you understand how to succeed in school and at work!
• Create and maintain relationships: You know how to develop relationships. You know how to relate to those close to you. You know how people can enhance the quality of your life. The same is true of school and a career. In college, you can develop and maintain relation- ships with your peers, instructors, and administrators who can help you through the college process. In the workplace, you can create strong relationships with people you spend at least eight hours a day with. And this knowledge is a significant part of working in groups both in college and in the workplace.
• Handle responsibilities: You know how to be responsible with your personal obligations. You know how to meet expectations in a timely way. You can apply this same knowledge to college by being a responsible student with a strong purpose. And in your career, you meet the necessities of the job because you know how to.
• Learn new information: You know how to learn—you’ve done it all your life. Certainly, learning new information is a major part of the college experience, but you already know how to learn. You apply the same methodologies you have already learned to college and career: you listen, analyze, apply, comprehend, know, and evaluate. Learning new tasks—for example, on the job—is what you had to do and now know how to do.
• Achieve your goal: You know what it takes to achieve goals. Wanting a college degree is a major goal. You’ve set many goals for yourself and
have worked very hard to achieve them. On the job, your goal might be a supervisory position. You apply the same tenacity, dedication, commitment, and clear focus you’ve always used to achieve what you want. You know what it takes—keeping your eye on the prize.
Skills
• Technical: How can you use your current technical skills: — researching topics on the Internet; writing and formatting papers on the computer; applying medical, legal, or other job-related skills—to class assignments and in your career? All skills you currently have can be useful and applied to college and your career.
• Communication: Your current writing skills will serve you well in col- lege and your career by your ability to compose papers. Additionally, you communicate with others and can apply those same skills to con- versing with your peers, instructors, and anyone else you come in contact with in college and your career.
• Organizational: Your life experiences have taught you to structure your time to meet deadlines. This skill is critical in college and in the workplace, for you’ll have to complete assignments at specific times. Additionally, you can use these already-practiced skills in such classes as math and English by using a formulaic approach as a way to organize ideas to answer math questions and writing papers. You’ve already developed these skills and know how to structure and organize your time to meet your obligations and responsibilities. Organizational skills are a part of your daily life, and now you can use them in school.
Wisdom
The wisdom you’ve gained over the years can certainly be applied to college and the workplace. The moral code by which you live dictates how you meet what is expected of you. In college, you’re expected to write your own papers and not plagiarize. In college, you’re expected to submit work when it’s due—not make excuses for not doing the work. In college and the workplace, you’re expected to accept responsibility for your actions, which—as an adult learner—you already know how to do.
Copyright 2011 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third-party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.
What Is Can Be
The knowledge, skills, and wisdom you possess will guide and support you in college and in the workplace. However, this information may be a bit rusty. You now have the opportunity to use and develop your current insight and expertise in college to successfully complete your goals.

Develop and Expand What You Already Know
While you’ve gained knowledge, skills, and wisdom from your own life experiences, there is always room to experiment, grow, change, develop, improve, and practice—and college is the ideal place to do it. How fortunate you are to have an opportunity to expand on what knowledge, skills, and wisdom you already possess. To increase your current knowledge, skill level, and wisdom, take full advantage of the college experience to succeed in the career you’ve chosen.
Develop Your Communication Skills
Verbal Skills
• Improve your vocabulary: When an employer asks you specific questions, he or she wants specific answers. For example, if you respond to “Where do you see yourself in five years” with “Gee, I dunno—maybe working,” you’re demonstrating a limited vocabulary. Increasing your vocabulary gives you access to words to express yourself articulately and succinctly. Words have power, and by increasing your language capabilities, you demonstrate that power. While you’re in college, start to build your storehouse of words to use in your career.
• Eliminate slang, clichés, and colloquialisms: Language is dynamic; it changes constantly. In the workplace, contemporary words and phrases are inappropriate. Make the effort in college to begin speaking like a professional.
• Use nonsexist and culturally sensitive language: In business, you don’t want to offend anyone with your vocabulary. Our world is wonderfully diverse, which requires an awareness and sensitivity of cultural differences. Avoid sexist terminology.
• Be specific: To get what you want, articulate what your needs are so the listener understands you. To avoid any confusion or misunderstanding, use precise language that reflects your exact meaning. The more specific you are, the more likely you are to get what you want. Take advantage of conversations with your college peers and teachers to develop and practice this skill.
• Take advantage of all public speaking classes: The thought of speaking in front of a class may invoke fear, but the experiences and skills you learn are invaluable to personal success. Many careers will require you to stand in front of your peers, coworkers, or supervisors and speak. While the thought of speaking in public may frighten you, it can also allow you the opportunity to develop those skills that you will
use in your career. Be aware that most employers consider effective public speaking skills an integral component of advancement, so be courageous and stand up in front of your speech class!
Writing Skills
• Participate fully in all English classes: English courses are a college requirement. To develop your current writing skills, participate fully in class, complete all assignments, and learn all you can about effective writing skills. Consider English classes as a means to self-improvement—a sort of insurance policy you can cash in on later.
Develop Your Critical Thinking Abilities
• Rely on your own abilities to solve problems: You know how to solve problems. There are times when you need help from others to resolve problems you may face, but most times, your life experiences can be the basis for problem-solving. Whatever and whenever problems arise in college, make attempts to solve them on your own first, and if you can’t, then seek the help of others.
• Develop and improve critical thinking skills in all facets of life: You use critical thinking every day in managing your life. From assembling your children’s toys to organizing and completing responsibilities, you analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information to make effective choices. In college, you can further develop these skills to meet dead- lines and complete work-related tasks.
• Be a team player: You know how to work with others, which is one of the most significant college and workplace skills. In study groups, you can expand these skills, which are valuable in the workplace.
Open Your Heart and Mind to New Ideas and Possibilities
• Question what you know, what you think you know, and what you hear: Questioning doesn’t mean you doubt what you hear, think, or know. In fact, it means the opposite. Questioning is a way to discover the truth so you can make more informed choices. Making more informed choices increases your current knowledge and critical thinking skills.
• Open your mind: We all have opinions; we believe we’re right (and others wrong) about many things. College gives you the opportunity to learn to open your mind to accept different opinions, ideas, a