• Home

Marketing homework help

COURSE CODE:BCO223 COURSE NAME: SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING FINAL PROJECT Task brief & rubrics

FINAL PROJECT – PLAN REPORT TASK: Develop a Social Media Marketing Plan

You should imagine that you are working for a small or medium size company that chooses to develop a social media campaign plan. Assume that you are presenting IN A WRITTEN REPORT your plan to the main stakeholders of the company for their approval. A key element of the assignment is how realistic you are in your proposal.

Your plan must include:

· What the company does and its market.

· What you want to achieve with the social media campaign and why (Business Objectives and Social media goals)

· The plan of action, the steps you will take, estimated time spans (actions, timing etc)

· Key messages to transmit (a short video/image with the proper text, message and Call to Action) (tools for videos, Canvas, animoto or any other tool)

· Key metrics by which you will measure success or failure.

· An indication of the resources you need to dedicate to it like HR, FINANCIAL, TECH etc.

Be realistic and do an educated guess in the numbers that you cannot support them with arguments.

Formalities:

· Wordcount: 2000 words of the report

· Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

· Font: Tahoma 12,5 pts.

· Text alignment: Justified.

· The in-text References and the Bibliography have to be in Harvard’s citation style.

· Submission: REPORT Sunday MAY 8th via Moodle at 23:59

· Weight: This task is a 60% of your total grade for this subject.

· Group of 2 people

Summative assignments: https://euruniedu-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/pablo_gilardini_euruni_edu/EcI00uOombFCh4Kbiu6cAwsBrF3hMUxf2xADMXzyl8x-Hw?e=gcidrK

https://euruniedu-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/pablo_gilardini_euruni_edu/EekNmUztfMJBvmWY1XMjwFQBZ-K9vruYM91q_5Usmt77CA?e=N5oVuz

https://casecent.re/p/181452

https://casecent.re/p/175463

It assesses the following learning outcomes:

· Design the social media marketing plan and apply it to reach specific social media objectives

· Analyse the social community and application of brand strategies

RUBRICS SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING PLAN

 

Excellent 

90-100 

Good 

80-89 

Fair 

70-79 

Marginal Fail 

60-69 

Fail

<60

Knowledge

(30%)

Demonstrates exceptional coherence of ideas for knowledge and understanding of the key concepts of social media marketing, plan is realistic.

Demonstrates good knowledge and understanding of key concepts of social media marketing at a good level.

The presentation demonstrates a satisfactory level of knowledge and understanding of concepts at this basic level but there is little evidence of research

Demonstrates poor knowledge and lack of understanding of the key concepts of social media marketing. There is no evidence of credible wider research

Demonstrates extremely poor knowledge and lack of understanding of the key concepts in social media marketing. There is no evidence of credible wider research

Plan coherence

(30%)

The plan has been very well researched and prepared, is very realistic and could form the basis of a social media marketing plan.

The plan has been well prepared, is quite realistic, but would need minor amendments and/or additions in order to form the basis of a social media marketing plan.

The plan has been quite well prepared, but it would improve with further clarification prior to its execution. Most of the assumptions are realistic, but some are unreasonable.

The plan is insufficient. Either it would require further clarification before execution, or it is unrealistic, either in scope or outcome.

The plan is inadequate. Either it would require further clarification before execution, or it is unrealistic, either in scope or outcome.

Application

(30%)

Work shows an appropriate and relevant attempt to place knowledge in the context of social media marketing.

The presentation shows some attempt to place knowledge in the context of social media marketing.

There is some attempt to place knowledge in the context of social media marketing.

There is almost no attempt to place knowledge in the context of social media marketing.

There is no attempt to place knowledge in the context of social media marketing.

Communication

(10%)

Provides a very clear plan, using conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with a very high degree of effectiveness.  

Provides a clear plan, using conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with considerable effectiveness. 

Provides a somewhat clear plan, using conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with some effectiveness.

Plan is somewhat unclear. There is a lack of use of conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline.  

Answer is unclear. Lack of use of conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline.  

Marketing homework help

Communicating professionally and ethically is an essential skill set we teach at

Strayer. The following guidelines ensure:

·· Your writing is professional

·· You avoid plagiarizing others

·· You give credit to others in your work

 Review Strayer’s Academic Integrity Policy in the Student Handbook.

 Bookmark the SWS website for additional SWS resources.

 Visit the SWS YouTube page to view helpful SWS videos.

Fall 2020

Strayer Writing Standards 2

� Include page numbers.

� Use 1-inch margins.

� Use numerals (1, 2, 3, and so on) or spell out numbers (one, two, three, and so on).

� Double space body text in the assignment.

� Use consistent 12-point font.

� Use section headings to divide separate content areas. Center the section headings on the
page, be consistent, and include at least two section headings in the assignment.

� Include the assignment title, your name, course title, your professor’s name, and the date of
submission on a separate page (first page of submission).

� Use appropriate language and be concise.

� Write in active voice when possible. Find tips here.

� Use spelling/grammar check and proofread to keep work error free.

� Choose a point of view (first, second, or third person) as required by assignment guidelines.

� Provide credible sources to support your ideas/work when required. Find tips here.

� Cite sources throughout your work when you borrow someone else’s words or ideas.

� Don’t forget: Cite and add your textbook to the Source List if used as a source.

� Include a Sources List when the assignment requires research or if you cite the textbook.

� Type “Sources” centered horizontally on the first line of the Source List page.

� Record the sources that you used in your assignment in a numbered list (see Giving Credit to
Authors and Sources section).

Essay/Paper Guidelines

Design

Title Page

Develop

Cite Credible
Sources

Build a
Sources List

Use these rules when working on an essay!

Strayer Writing Standards 3

� Use the provided template to format the assignment.

� Generally not required. If it is required, include the assignment title, your name, course
title, your professor’s name, and the date of submission on a separate page (first page of
submission).

� Use appropriate language and be concise.

� Write in active voice when possible. Find tips here.

� Use spelling/grammar check and proofread to keep work error free.

� Choose a point of view (first, second, or third person) as required by assignment guidelines.

� Specific assignment guidelines may override these standards. When in doubt, follow specific
assignment guidelines first.

� Provide credible sources to support your ideas/work when required. Find tips here.

� Cite sources throughout your work when you borrow someone else’s words or ideas.

� Don’t forget: Cite and add your textbook to the Source List if used as a source.

� Complete the provided Source List when the assignment requires research or if you cite the
textbook.

� If no specific area exists in the template, consult the assignment and instructor guidelines for
appropriate source credit methods.

� Cite sources throughout your assignment when you borrow someone else’s words or ideas.

� When quoting or paraphrasing a source, include the source number in parentheses after the
body text where you quote or paraphrase.

Templated Assignment Guidelines

Design

Title Page

Develop

Cite Credible
Sources

Build a
Source List

Use these rules when working on a written assignment that is not explicitly an essay!

Strayer Writing Standards 4

� Use a background color or image on slides.

� Use Calibri, Lucida Console, Helvetica, Futura, Myriad Pro, or Gill Sans font style.

� Use 28–32-point font size for the body of your slides (based on your chosen font style). Avoid
font sizes below 24-point.

� Use 36–44-point font size for the titles of your slides (based on chosen font style).

� Limit slide content (7 or fewer lines per slide and 7 or fewer words per line).

� Number slides when the assignment requires 3 or more slides. Place numbers wherever you
like (but be consistent).

� Include appropriate images that connect directly to the slide content or presentation content.

� Include the assignment title, your name, course title, your professor’s name, and the date of
submission on a separate slide (first of submission).

� Use appropriate language and be concise.

� Write in active voice when possible. Find tips here.

� Use spelling/grammar check and proofread to keep work error free.

� Provide credible sources to support your ideas/work when required. Find tips here.

� Cite sources throughout your work when you borrow someone else’s words or ideas.

� Don’t forget: Cite and add your textbook to the Source List if used as a source.

� Sources may be provided on a slide-by-slide basis (providing Source List entries at
bottom of slide where source referenced) or in a comprehensive Source List at the end of
slideshow.

� Include a Sources List slide when assignment requires research or if you cite the textbook.

� Type “Sources” centered horizontally on the first line of the Source List slide.

� Provide sources used in your assignment in a numbered list (see Giving Credit to Authors and
Sources section).

PowerPoint/Slideshow Guidelines

Design

Title Page

Develop

Cite Credible
Sources

Build a
Sources List

Use these rules when working on a PowerPoint or slideshow assignment!

Strayer Writing Standards 5

� Use consistent 12-point font.

� Include appropriate images or media links that connect directly to discussion topic/content.

� Use appropriate language and be concise.

� Write in active voice when possible. Find tips here.

� Use spelling/grammar check and proofread to keep work error free.

� Provide credible sources to support your ideas/work when required. Find tips here.

� Cite sources throughout your discussion response when you borrow someone else’s words or
ideas.

� Cite quotes and paraphrases correctly: Include the source number in parentheses after the
body text where quotation or paraphrasing occurs.

� Don’t forget: Cite and add your textbook to the Sources List if used as a source.

� Type the word “Sources” at the end of your post, and below that include a list of any sources
that you cited.

� Number all sources in the order they appear.

Discussion Post Guidelines

Design

Develop

Cite Credible
Sources

Use these rules when working on a Discussion Forum post or response!

For more information on building a Source List Entry, see
Source List section.

SAMPLE POST:

The work is the important part of any writing
assignment. According to Smith, “writing things
down is the biggest challenge” (1). This is significant
because…

Sources
1. William Smith. 2018. The Way Things Are. http://

www.samplesite.com/writing

If you pulled information from more than one source, continue
to number the additional sources in the order that they appear
in your post.

SAMPLE POST:

The work is the important part of any writing
assignment. According to Smith, “writing things
down is the biggest challenge” (1). This is significant
because…

The other side of this is also important. It is noted that
“the act of writing isn’t important as much as putting
ideas somewhere useful” (2).

Sources
1. William Smith. 2018. The Way Things Are. http://

www.samplesite.com/writing
2. Patricia Smith. 2018. The Way Things Really Are.

http://www.betterthansample.com/tiger

 Examples

Strayer Writing Standards 6

Credit to Authors and Sources

Option #1: Paraphrasing

Rewording Source Information in Your Own Words
· Rephrase source information in your own words. Avoid

repeating the same words of the author.

· Remember, you cannot just replace words from the original
sentence.

· Add the author’s last name and a number to the end of your
paraphrase as a citation (which will be the same on your
Source List).

 Examples

ORIGINAL SOURCE

“Writing at a college level requires informed research.”

PARAPHRASING

As Harvey wrote, when writing a paper for higher
education, it is critical to research and cite sources (1).

When writing a paper for higher education, it is
imperative to research and cite sources (Harvey, 1).

Option #2: Quoting

Citing Another Person’s Work Word-for-Word
· Place quotation marks at the beginning and end of quoted

information.

· Limit quotes to two or fewer sentences (approximately 25
words) at a time.

· Do not start a sentence with a quotation.

· Introduce and explain quotes within the context of your
paper.

· Add the author’s last name and a number to the end of the
quote as a citation (which will be the same on your Source
List).

 Examples

ORIGINAL SOURCE

“Writing at a college level requires informed research.”

QUOTING

Harvey wrote in his book, “Writing at a college level
requires informed research” (1).

Many authors agree, “Writing at a college level
requires informed research” (Harvey, 1).

Use these rules for using evidence and creating in-text citations!

General Credit
· Credit quoted or paraphrased sources using an in-text citation. An in-text citation includes the primary author’s last name and

the number of the source from the Source List.

· Before using any source, first determine its credibility. Then decide if the source is appropriate and relevant for your project. Find
tips here.

· Well-researched assignments have at least as many sources as pages (see assignment instructions).

Strayer Writing Standards 7

Web sources are accessed through an internet browser.

Home Pages
A home page loads when typing a standard web address. For instance, typing Google.com into any web browser will take you to
Google’s home page.

Cite a homepage when using information from a news thread, image, or basic piece of information on a company’s website. Find
Tips Here.

Specific Web Pages
If using any web page other than the home page, include the specific page title and direct link (when possible) in the Source List entry.

If the assignment used multiple web pages from the same source, create separate Source List entries (if the title and/or web address
is different).

Effective Internet Links
When sharing a link to an article with your instructor and classmates, start with a brief summary of the article and why you chose to
share it.

Share vs. URL Options
Cutting and pasting the URL (web address) from your browser may not allow others to view your source. This makes it hard for people to
engage with the content you used.

To avoid this problem, look for a “share” option and choose that when possible. Always test your link(s) before submitting.

If you cannot properly share the link, include the article/source as an attachment. Interested classmates and your professor can reference
the article shared as an attachment. Find tips here.

Credit for Web Sources

Charts, images, and tables should be centered horizontally on the page and should be followed by an in-text citation. Design your
page and place a citation below the chart, image, or table. When referring to the chart, image, or table in the body of the assignment,
use the citation.

Do not include a chart, image, or table without introducing it in the assignment and explaining why it is necessary.

On your Source List, provide the following details of the visual:

· Author’s name (if created by you, provide your name).

· Date (if created by you, provide the year).

· Type (Chart, Image, or Table).

· How to find it (link or other information; see Source List section for additional details).

Charts, Images, and Tables

Strayer Writing Standards 8

Traditional Sources

Page Numbers
When referencing multiple pages in a textbook or other print
book, consider adding page numbers to help the audience
understand where the information is found. You can do this in
three ways:

a. by including it in the body of your assignment; or

or b. by using an in-text citation;

or c. by listing page numbers in the order used in your
assignment on the Source List.

Check with your instructor or the assignment guidelines to see
if there is a preference based on your course.

 Example

IN-TEXT CITATION

(Harvey, 1, p. 16)

In the example, the author is Harvey, the source list number is
1, and the page number where this information can be found is
page 16.

Multiple Sources (Synthesizing)
Synthesizing is the use of multiple sources in one paraphrased
sentence or paragraph to make a strong point. While this is
normally done in advanced writing, it could be useful for any
writing where you use more than one source. Find tips here.

The key is clarity. If you paraphrase multiple sources in the
same sentence (or paragraph if most of the information
contained in the paragraph is paraphrased), you should
include each source in the citation. Separate sources using
semi-colons (;) and create the citation in the normal style that
you would for using only one source (Name, Source Number).

 Example

SYNTHESIZED IN-TEXT CITATION

(Harvey, 1; Buchanan, 2)

In the example, the authors Harvey and Buchanan were
paraphrased to help the student make a strong point. Harvey
is the first source on the Source List, and Buchanan is the
second source on the Source List.

Advanced Methods
Some assignments require more advanced techniques. If necessary, these guidelines help with special
case scenarios.

Strayer Writing Standards 9

Substitution and Ellipsis
Omitting unnecessary information from a direct quotation is
often required. To omit information, delete the unnecessary
information and replace it with an ellipsis inside of square
brackets, like this: […]. Find tips here.

There are times when a quality source has made a mistake,
but you still value the information that the source provides. To
solve this issue, change elements of the source (noting what
additions or changes were required). When changing elements
within a direct quotation, delete the original information and
surround the new wording or spelling with square brackets, like
this: “[W]riting”.

The bracket here shows that the original source may have
misspelled “writing” or that the “W” has been capitalized and
was lowercase in the source material.

NOTE: Ellipsis and square brackets cannot be used in
paraphrased source material.

 Example

ORIGINAL SOURCE

“Writing at a college level requires informed
research.”

ELLIPSIS

Harvey wrote that writing “at a college level
requires […] research” (1).

SUBSTITUTION

Many authors agree that “[w]riting at an [undergrad-
uate] college level requires informed research” (1).

Footnotes and Additional Content
Written assignments may benefit from including relevant
background information that is not necessarily important for the
main body of the assignment.

To include extra secondary evidence or authorial commentary,
insert a numeral superscript into the text of the assignment
and add the extra evidence or commentary in the footer of the
page as a footnote. (Note: Microsoft Word’s “Insert Footnote”
function is the preferred method.)

 Example

When writing a paper for higher education,4 it is
imperative to research and cite sources (Harvey,
1). This suggestion applies to both undergraduate
and graduate students, and it is the first thing that
beginning students must internalize.

4 Mathews has pointed out that this suggestion is appropriate
for all levels of education, even those outside of university, and
is in fact best practices for any form of professional writing
(2). However, this paper focuses specifically on writing
in college-level education.

Appendices
An assignment may require an appendix following the Source List. The appendix is meant to declutter the assignment body or
provide relevant supplemental information for the audience.

If there is only one appendix, it is labeled, Appendix. More than one appendix may be required. Label the first appendix Appendix
A, the second Appendix B, and so on. Each chart, graphic, or photograph referred to in the body of the assignment requires its
own listing in the appendices.

Use descriptive labels in the body of your written assignment to link each chart, graphic, or photograph to its place in the
appendices. For example, when referring to a chart found in Appendix B, a student would include (see Appendix B, Cost of Tuition
in Secondary Education, 2010-2019) after referring to data drawn from that chart.

Strayer Writing Standards 10

Source List
The Source List includes all sources used in your assignment. It is a new page added at the end of your
assignment. The list gives credit to authors whose work supported your own and should provide enough
information so that others can find the source(s) without your help.

Build your Source List as you write.

� Type “Sources” at the top of a new page.

� Include a numbered list of the sources you used in your paper (the numbers indicate the
order in which you used them).

1. Use the number one (1) for the first source used in the paper, the number two (2) for the
second source, and so on.

2. Use the same number for a source if you use it multiple times.

� Ensure each source includes five parts: author or organization, publication date, title, page
number (if needed), and how to find it. If you have trouble finding these details, then re-
evaluate the credibility of your source.

� Use the browser link for a public webpage.

� Use a permalink for a webpage when possible. Find tips here.

� Instruct your readers on how to find all sources that do not have a browser link or a permalink.

� Separate each Source List element with a period on your Source List.

AUTHOR PUBLICATION DATE TITLE PAGE NO. HOW TO FIND

The person(s) who published
the source. This can be a
single person, a group of
people, or an organization. If
the source has no author, use
“No author” where you would
list the author.

The date the source was
published. If the source has
no publication date, use “No
date” where you would list
the date.

The title of the
source. If the
source has no title,
use “No title” where
you would list the
title.

The page
number(s) used.
If the source has
no page numbers,
omit this section
from your Source
List Entry.

Instruct readers how to find all
sources. Keep explanations
simple and concise, but provide
enough information so the
source can be located. Note:
It is your responsibility to make
sure the source can be found.

 Examples

Michael Harvey

In the case of multiple
authors, only list the first.

2013

This is not the same as
copyright date, which is
denoted by ©

The Nuts & Bolts
of College Writing

p. 1

Include p. and the
page(s) used.

http://libdatab.strayer.edu/
login?url=http://search.
ebscohost.com/login.aspx

Setting Up the
Source List Page

Creating a
Source List Entry

Source List Elements

Strayer Writing Standards 11

NOTE: For the example, Harvey is the first source used in the assignment.

 How It Will Look in Your Source List

1. Michael Harvey. 2013. The Nuts & Bolts of College Writing. p. 1. http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=http://
search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=590706&site=eds-live&scope=site

 Sample Source List

Sources

1. Michael Harvey. 2013. The Nuts & Bolts of College Writing. p. 1. http://libdatab.strayer.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.

com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=590706&site=eds-live&scope=site

2. William R. Stanek. 2010. Storyboarding Techniques chapter in Effective Writing for Business, College and Life. http://libdatab.

strayer.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=359141&site=eds-live&scope=site&e

bv=EB&ppid=pp_23

3. Zyad Hicham. 2017. Vocabulary Growth in College-Level Students’ Narrative Writing. http://libdatab.strayer.edu/

login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.9b7fad40e529462bafe3a936aaf81420

&site=eds-live&scope=site

4. Anya Kamenetz. July 10, 2015. The Writing Assignment That Changes Lives. https://www.npr.org/sections/

ed/2015/07/10/419202925/the-writing-assignment-that-changes-lives

  1. C38: Off
  2. C39: Off
  3. C40: Off
  4. C41: Off
  5. C42: Off
  6. C43: Off
  7. C45: Off
  8. C46: Off
  9. C47: Off
  10. C48: Off
  11. C50: Off
  12. C51: Off
  13. C52: Off
  14. C55: Off
  15. C56: Off
  16. C57: Off
  17. C59: Off
  18. Button 3:
  19. C44: Off
  20. C53: Off
  21. C58: Off
  22. C60: Off
  23. C62: Off
  24. C63: Off
  25. C64: Off
  26. C65: Off
  27. C66: Off
  28. C67: Off
  29. C69: Off
  30. C70: Off
  31. C71: Off
  32. Button 4:
  33. C68: Off
  34. C49: Off
  35. C54: Off
  36. C61: Off
  37. C72: Off
  38. C73: Off
  39. C74: Off
  40. C75: Off
  41. C76: Off
  42. C77: Off
  43. C78: Off
  44. C84: Off
  45. C79: Off
  46. C80: Off
  47. C81: Off
  48. Button 5:
  49. C82: Off
  50. C85: Off
  51. C83: Off
  52. C86: Off
  53. C87: Off
  54. C88: Off
  55. C89: Off
  56. C90: Off
  57. C92: Off
  58. C93: Off
  59. C94: Off
  60. C95: Off
  61. C98: Off
  62. C99: Off
  63. C100: Off
  64. Button 6:
  65. C91: Off
  66. C97: Off
  67. C101: Off
  68. C102: Off
  69. C103: Off
  70. C104: Off
  71. Button 8:
  72. C96: Off

Marketing homework help

BBA221 MARKETING RESEARCH Task brief & rubrics

Task – Final assignment – individual marketing research paper

You must develop a Marketing Research project based on a clear and specific marketing problem or opportunity of your choice, detailing the objectives, and

explaining why they chose their research design method and how they arrived at their results.

The structure of the assignment should be as follows (please read the description carefully to make sure you include all necessary information):

1. Introduction: discussing the purpose and main objective of the project, as well as the relevance of the topic.

2. Literature review: explain what has been said until now, what other authors have discovered, and highlight the gap in literature.

3. Research questions and methodology: list the research questions and their relevance; and methodology explaining how you will address and answer the

marketing problem and justifying this choice of methodology. Be very clear about the methodological approach, instruments and the sample.

4. Results: analysis using pertinent theories and models studied in class, use of facts and figures, tables, and visual material (properly cited).

5. Conclusion and recommendation: Key insights and conclusions that can be drawn from the analysis (implications, meaning for the company; it should

not be a mere summary of findings). What is a key recommendation that you can suggest, considering the findings?

6. List of references

7. Appendices (if necessary)

Remember that is important that you justify your answers and include in-text citations throughout the submitted document, as seen in class, as well as a list of

references. This directly affects the quality and credibility of your work.

Formalities:

• Wordcount: 2500 words.

• Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

• Font: Arial 11, line spacing 1.5

• The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Submission: Week 12: Sunday 1st of May 2022 (CET).

Weight: This task is 60% of your total grade for this subject.
It assesses the following learning outcomes:

– translate the research insights into a professional report understandable to marketing managers.

– apply the appropriate research design methods to obtain insights into the marketing research problems or opportunities

Rubrics – Midterm task

Exceptional 90-100 Good 80-89 Fair 70-79 Marginal fail 60-69

Literature review
(20%)

The literature review is
thoroughly developed,
addressing all key topics
and relevant authors. The
gap in literature is highly
emphasized.

The literature review is well
developed, addressing key
topics and relevant
authors. The gap in
literature is overall
emphasized.

The literature review is well
developed, addressing key
topics and relevant
authors. The gap in
literature is overall
emphasized.

The literature review is not
very thoroughly developed,
addressing key topics and
relevant authors would be
necessary. The gap in
literature should be clearer.

Methodology (25%) The RQ is very clear and
relevant. The methodology
is highly pertinent and
clearly explains the
research approach,
instrument, and sample in
a well-reasoned manner.

The RQ is clear and
relevant. The methodology
is overall pertinent and
clearly explains the
research approach,
instrument, and sample in
a clear manner.

The RQ is overall clear and
relevant. The methodology
is overall adequate but
could use some more
details about the research
approach, instrument, and
sample.

The RQ is overall clear and
relevant. The methodology is
overall adequate but could
use some more details about
the research approach,
instrument, and sample.

Results (20%) The results are very well
explained, and the visual
aspect has been enhanced
to improve readability.

The results are well
explained, and the visual
aspect has been enhanced
to improve readability.

The results are very well
explained, but the visual
aspect could be enhanced
to improve readability.

The results should be better
explained, and the visual
aspect should be enhanced
to improve readability.

Introduction and
conclusion (15%)

The introduction presents
the report in a very
appealing manner and the
conclusion demonstrates
very good critical skills.

The introduction presents
the report in a good and
appealing manner and the
conclusion demonstrates
good critical skills.

The introduction presents
the report in a fair manner
and the conclusion could
demonstrate good critical
skills if improved.

The introduction should
present the report in a better
manner and the conclusion
should focus on
demonstrating critical skills.

Communication
(20%)

You communicate your
ideas extremely clearly and
in-text citations are
adequately included in
throughout the document
and in the list of
references.

You communicate your
ideas clearly and pertinent
in-text citations are
included.

You communicate your
ideas with some clarity and
references are included to
a satisfactory extent,
although they need to be
reviewed.

You communicate your ideas
in a somewhat unclear and
unconcise way. References
are not adequately included.

Marketing homework help

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

Available online 14 April 2021
0308-5961/© 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

“The Netflix effect” in Thailand: Industry and
regulatory implications

Pirongrong Ramasoota *, Abhibhu Kitikamdhorn
Faculty of Communication Arts, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand

A R T I C L E I N F O

Keywords:
VoD
OTT
Globalization
Thailand
Netflix
Content streaming

A B S T R A C T

This study examines the economic, technological and cultural implications of Netflix in Thailand
on local content industries and regulators. It also explores industry and regulatory responses to
Netflix’s emergence in a small market like Thailand. The study finds Netflix has markedly
affected the industries’ value chain but with contrasting impacts for broadcasting and film.
Broadcasters have migrated online either by establishing their own platforms or by repositioning
themselves as content providers for international streaming players in addition to acquiring
business deals with other OTTs or broadcasters in regional markets. For film, a window of op-
portunity has been created by Netflix for small and independent filmmakers wishing to bypass
the long-standing monopoly in the Thai film industry. Meanwhile, the country’s regulator has
looked for ways to bring foreign OTTs like Netflix under its oversight and may adopt a reward-
based scheme while promoting local content industry with capacity-building and promotional
measures.

This article studies “the Netflix effect” in Thailand, examining implications of the global platform’s inroad into the country in
technological, economic, and cultural terms as well as effects on local broadcasting and content industries in addition to regulatory and
policy challenges posed by this globalizing media phenomenon.

The account, based on secondary data and primary research – content analysis and key informant interviews – are provided in the
below sections.

1. Netflix and success factors in Thailand

On January 2, 2016, Netflix entered the Thai market as a part of its global expansion into 130 new countries (Bangkok Post and AP,
2016). With the country’s high rates of internet penetration and online video consumption (the highest in Southeast Asia), robust

* Corresponding author. ,
E-mail addresses: pirongrong.r@gmail.com, pirongrong.r@chula.ac.th (P. Ramasoota), abhibhu@hotmail.com (A. Kitikamdhorn).

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Telecommunications Policy

journal homepage: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/telpol

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2021.102156
Received 30 August 2020; Received in revised form 1 March 2021; Accepted 26 March 2021

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

2

digital infrastructure,1 and a rather relaxed regulatory environment for internet-distributed media,2 Netflix anticipated good business
prospects here. The records in the subsequent four years have confirmed this expectation with the number of subscribers which have
more than quadrupled (Statista, 2016) (see Fig. 1 below).

Since Netflix’s arrival, the Thai Video on Demand (VoD) market has also experienced a steady rise in value. Within two years,
Netflix managed to gain a market share of 25 per cent for the SVoD (Subscriber-based VoD) segment, the largest when compared to
other international and local players such as Hooq, iFlix, and Hollywood. That is, in 2018, Netflix accounted for about US$ 17.25
million of the Thai SVOD market (Office of The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, 2018).

Notably, while the global COVID-19 lockdown in early 2020 earned Netflix an additional 16 million new subscribers worldwide
(Zeitchik, 2020), the revenue from Netflix in Thailand in the first three months of 2020 also rose from US$167.09 million to US$182.86
million as more people confined at home signed up for the service (สำนกัส�งเสรมิการแข�งขนัและกำกบัดูแลกนัเอง, 2020).

Fig. 1. Estimated number of active streaming subscribers to Netflix in Thailand (2017–2020).

1 Countrywide internet penetration rate is estimated at 75 per cent in January 2020 while the number of mobile connections is 134 per cent of the
total population (Office of The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, 2020). Fixed broadband has been expanding at a steady
rate with 46.8 household penetration nationwide or around 10.1 million subscribers in the last quarter of 2019. There are four major service
providers in the fixed broadband segment while mobile broadband is provided by five large players. The cost of broadband internet services is quite
low averaging at 4.34 baht (US$0.14) per Mbps or 588 baht (US$18.65) per month. In addition, a total of 17 operators serve as International
Internet Gateway (IIG) and simultaneously as National Internet Exchange (NIX) (สำนกัวชิาการและจดัการทรพัยากร
โทรคมนาคมสายงานกจิการโทรคมนาคม, 2019). The latest statistics from 2020 show a high number of average daily internet use (9.01 h) via mobile
phones, tablets, and computers with VoD content consumption accounting for the largest proportion (99%) compared to other types of online
content including vlogs (53%), music (68%), online radio program (52%), and podcasts (44%) (Kemp, 2020).

2 The country’s communications regulator, the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) only regulates licensees that
are local operators of broadcasting and telecommunications services on business and content issues. Meanwhile, the Ministry of Digital Economy
and Society has legal authority over computer-related offences which spans over online content. However, cross-border streaming data like video-
on-demand has not been clearly addressed in terms of jurisdiction and regulatory oversight since they are not registered businesses in Thailand and
not license holders of the NBTC.

P. Ramasoota and A. Kitikamdhorn

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

3

Apart from a clear comparative advantage in terms of investment capital, content resources and AI-based user engagement scheme,
Netflix’s success in Thailand could also be attributed to these factors: pricing strategies, synergy through platform effect, globalization
of content and data-driven content harnessing and design.

1. Pricing strategies

Netflix has relied on competitive pricing to attract new subscribers while maintaining the loyalty of existing customers. Apart from
free trials and reducing the minimum subscription rate to only US$3 per month, Netflix also uses tiered pricing to cater to different
needs of customers. (See Table 1). This pricing strategy clearly appeals to the local audience who have migrated from traditional linear
television to VoD in favor of a wider content variety and more flexible viewing experience.

2. Platform synergy and leveraging with local players

Relevant literature shows that many disciplines have used the conceptual framework of “platformization3” to study the influence or
impact of the globalization on technological platforms. From the business studies’ perspective, platforms assume an intermediary role
in connecting institutional actors with end-users, and constitute a complex “multisided markets,” in which powerful platform operators
can gain a dominant position in the multisided markets creating “network effects.”

The network effects can be “direct or indirect and positive or negative” (Nieborg & Poell, 2018). For instance, Netflix’s trans-
national expansion can directly cause TISPs to upgrade or adjust their connectivity to match Netflix’s requirements4 in order to
maintain their quality of service (Lobato, 2019).

One of the strategies used by Netflix in its internationalization is through strengthening of technological infrastructure for its global
platform and using that as leverage with local players. Back in the 2000s when Netflix began its international expansion, the streaming
service was relying on local ISPs and soon faced problem of overloaded data traffic to the point of system crash in 2008. Thereafter,
Netflix discontinued the use of physical data centers and ISPs and instead shifted to Amazon cloud computing services or AWS
(Amazon Web Services5). On top of AWS, Netflix established a new fast lane by setting up its own content delivery networks (CDNs6).

Through AWS and CDNs, Netflix has managed to secure its own internal infrastructure but on a global scale. This infrastructure
consists of two levels through which the content flows (See Fig. 2 and Text box 1 which together explains about AWS and CDN as well
as content requesting process on the platform).

For Thailand, Netflix is clearly in the dominant position using network connectivity standard to the platform as a leverage. For
example, Netflix publishes the ISP Speed Index on a website that allows subscribers to find out if the network connectivity they have is
compatible with Netflix’s streaming service or not, and provide updates when TISPs adjust their available bandwidth. Some TISPs in
Thailand such as AIS Fiber, a leading local TISP, have adjusted their marketing strategy by referring to information on the speed index
website that their network has the highest speed compared to other TISPs in Thailand. AIS also collaborated with Netflix in many areas.
For instance.

• AIS added Netflix service as a menu in its AIS PLAYBOX for convenience since February 2019 (PR News, 2019).

Table 1
Netflix Thailand’s tiered pricing schemea.

Mobile Basic Standard Premium

Monthly cost* (Thai Baht = 0.033 USD) 99 THB 279 THB 349 THB 419 THB
Number of screens you can watch on at the same time 1 1 2 4
Number of phones or tablets you can have downloads on 1 1 2 4
Unlimited movies and TV shows
Watch on your mobile phone and tablet
Watch on your laptop and TV
HD available
Ultra HD available

a Netflix’s plans and pricing for Thailand (Netflix, n.d.).

3 Platformization refers to “the penetration of economic, governmental, and infrastructural extensions of digital platforms into the web and app
ecosystems, fundamentally affecting the operations of the cultural industries” (Nieborg & Poell, 2018).

4 Netflix’s recommendations of internet speed are as follows: the recommended speed for stable use is 0.5 Mbps, for HD streaming is 3.0 Mbps, and
5.0 Mbps is for Super HD streaming (Lobato, 2019).

5 AWS is a cloud computing technology that utilizes microservice architecture. Microservice concept was created to support software that was
written in such a way that it can be broken into smaller pieces and run on multiple servers (Tabora, 2019).

6 CDN is designed in such a way that there are a number of servers with requested content located near where the user is so that network latency is
acceptable. AWS provides service based on concept of regions. Subscribers anywhere in the world are served by AWS servers in the closest regions.
For instance, subscribers in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa are served from Ireland. Subscribers in Latin American and the US subscribers are
served from Northern Virginia or Oregon. Subscribers in the Asia-Pacific region are served from Oregon (Lobato, 2019).

P. Ramasoota and A. Kitikamdhorn

TelecommunicationsPolicy45
(2021)102156

4

Fig. 2. Netflix’s logical network diagram and content requesting process.

P. R
am

asoota and A
. K

itikam
dhorn

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

5

AIS customers can pay their Netflix bills via AIS Fibre bills and can upgrade their Netflix account type through “AIS-Netflix” promotion
campaign (AIS, n.d.; AIS Fibre, n.d.).
• In November 2019, True, another major TISP in Thailand, also added Netflix service as a menu in its TrueiD TV box (Techsauce

Team, 2019).
3. Globalization of content and data-driven content harnessing and design

In line with its global marketing and content strategies, Netflix has tried to appeal to local Thai audience with its GLT (global-
ization/internationalization, localization, and translation) approach (Lobato, 2019). A Netflix representative in Thailand echoes this
“globalize to localize” approach in a seminar with local movie directors in 2020 (Thai Film Director Association, 2020).

The globalizing element is clearly reflected in the platform’s key resources – content library. Based on an analysis of Netflix
Thailand’s content library from 10 August to October 8, 2020, using country of origin as criterion, we find a global mix of 5800 titles.
The first top five countries in the ranking are the US, with 1952 titles (33.66 per cent), India with 775 titles (13.36 per cent), South
Korea with 344 titles (5.93 per cent), Japan with 298 titles (5.14 per cent) and UK with 273 titles (4.71 per cent). As for content from
Thailand, a total of 240 titles are found, representing 4.14 per cent of the entire catalogue (see Fig. 3).

Apart from the overall content library, we also examined content under Trending Now and Top 10 in Thailand for one week, using
newly subscribed accounts to get as close to the program’s default as possible. From a total of 421 titles analyzed, the US also topped
the chart with 182 titles (or 43.23 per cent), followed by South Korea with 61 titles (or 14.49 per cent), Thailand with 55 titles (or
13.06 per cent), Japan with 43 titles (or 10.21 per cent), and the UK with 20 titles (or 4.75 per cent). See Table 2.

While the analysis of all three catalogues shows the US-originated content as foremost, reinforcing the Hollywood brand at the
center of global entertainment flow, the findings from the tally of the two popularized catalogues also indicate elements of cultural
proximity and multi-centers of global cultural influence with the presence of South Korean and Thai titles in the top tier. Since the
subscribers’ accounts used to access content are brand new, they are less likely to be affected by algorithmic calculations based on user
preference and viewing history. Hence, the result captured here should reflect localized tastes as well as the platform’s predisposition
towards micro-marketing. Notably, Thailand is deeply dominated by Hallyu or the Korean cultural wave. A good supporting evidence
lies in the fact that tweets about K-pop on Twitter in 2019 originated most from Thailand (Bernardo, 2020). Netflix’s prioritizing South
Korean content on its Thai platform is, therefore, understandable.

Overall, Netflix has acquired its streaming content which vary in genres – movies, series, documentaries, animations, and cartoons
– from three main sources:

1) Syndicated content that has been aired (via broadcasting channels) or screened (in movie theaters);
2) New content (not yet aired or screened in any media outlets) that Netflix has purchased copyrights from content creators;
3) Netflix original content that the platform developed in collaboration with local producers from different countries around the

world.

Text Box 1
Description of Netflix’s logical network diagram and content requesting process.

The basic part of Netflix software that users see before they hit the “Play” button such as user interface, customer/subscriber
data, run efficiently on AWS. Instead of using major CDN providers such as Akamai or Level3, Netflix builds its own CDN, called
Open Connect. Netflix has struck deals with internet service providers (ISPs) to have its Open Connect box installed next to ISPs’
servers. These Open Connect boxes download the Netflix library for their region from the main servers in the US — if there are
multiple of servers, each will rather store content that is more popular with Netflix users in a particular region to prioritise speed.

The process of content request on the platform can be explained accordingly:

1) A subscriber requests video content. The request will be sent via local ISP to the Netflix network. Netflix can learn from the IP
address of the subscriber’s device which region the user is in then route the request to the “closest” servers in order to achieve
optimal performance;

2) After the Netflix servers analyze the request, it then begins its content retrieval process;
3) Netflix can learn about the subscriber’s device and available network speed then adjust dynamically resolution of content to

be sent back to subscriber. This process is called “transcoding”;
4) Netflix then identify which CDN that has requested content and is closest to the subscriber. The content is then streamed from

that CDN (Lobato, 2019; Nair, 2017; Netflix Case Study, n.d.; Tabora, 2019).

P. Ramasoota and A. Kitikamdhorn

TelecommunicationsPolicy45
(2021)102156

6

Fig. 3. Content available on Netflix Thailand by country origin.

P. R
am

asoota and A
. K

itikam
dhorn

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

7

Netflix usually acquires a two-year licensing contract for the syndicated content which accounts for the main part of the catalogue.
This is to assure that there will be new content regularly circulating in the platform. As for the content that Netflix acquired copyrights,
the platform would likely put the Netflix original label on the content although it bears no involvement in the production process at all.
This is what happened in the case of the movie “The Maid,7” an original production by a group of Thai filmmakers.8 The movie was
originally due to be screened in theaters. But due to the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, the movie producers decided to sell the
copyright to Netflix. Thereafter, the movie came to be known under Netflix’s original label.

As for Netflix’s originals, in its four-year operations in Thailand there has only been one Netflix’s original production in the form of
a cinematic series “The Stranded.” The series was a collaboration between Netflix Studios, Los Angeles-based H2L Media Group and
GMM Grammy’s Bravo Studio. GMM is a major entertainment conglomerate in Thailand. The story centers around a group of teenagers
who are stranded on an island in Southern Thailand when a tsunami hits. The Stranded bears uncanny resemblance to an American
drama TV series “Lost” which was about survivors of a commercial jet airliner’s crash. Both series also contain elements of supernatural
forces and science fiction.

After it was released in November 2019 on Netflix, The Stranded was not deemed a success, with poor reviews and low viewership
especially from the local market, hence resulting in its second season being cancelled.9 The series’ flop was said to be due to inadequate
understanding about the Thai context and local taste, and an overzealous attempt to duplicate a popular US series in the 2000s “Lost,
10.”

Like other Netflix originals, the design of The Stranded followed a content formula that was based on machine learning of users’
data in Netflix’s database – the metadata. Story plot and actions that have proven to garner audience’s viewership and engagement are
bound to be included in the formula. Furthermore, the content direction is also shaped by a globalized production alliance. Under this
transnational collaboration, GMM which led the local production team was obliged to follow the planning and work system of the core
team at Netflix Studio while letting H2L Studio be in charge of determining the plot and characterization. As far as casting and picking
shooting location are concerned, Bravo Studio also needs the approval from the American partners who closely supervised the series’
budgeting system, partner coordination, and diversity policy (MGRONLINE, 2019; Sunnywalker, 2019; WP, 2019).

All in all, Netflix relies heavily on the use of its metadata to select content for streaming catalogues or production team to work with
in developing Netflix’s original movies. Netflix’s metadata contains lists of synopses, story concepts, loglines,11 names of accredited
production houses, as well as names of accredited directors, and actors from countries around the world. These data are regularly
retrieved to analyze and help process decision-making on selection of content for the catalogues or local team to help develop Netflix
originals. This is to ensure that the harnessing and design of content will better cater to the taste of platform users in different regions of
the world.

As far as localization and local alliance are concerned, Netflix has invested significantly in the customization and localization of
content, subtitle, translation, interfaces and artworks (Lobato, 2019). In May 2020, as Covid-19 lockdown was being eased in Thailand,

Table 2
Content ranking in Netflix Thailand’s Top 10 in Thailand and Trending Now based on country of origin.

Origin Top10 in Thailand Today % Trending Now % Combined Total %

USA 28 40.00 154 43.87 182 43.23
South Korea 14 20.00 47 13.39 61 14.49
Thailand 23 32.86 32 9.12 55 13.06
Japan 0.00 43 12.25 43 10.21
UK 0.00 20 5.70 20 4.75
Spain 0.00 12 3.42 12 2.85
Germany 0.00 8 2.28 8 1.90
Mexico 0.00 8 2.28 8 1.90
Denmark 1 1.43 7 1.99 8 1.90
Canada 0.00 7 1.99 7 1.66
Poland 0.00 4 1.14 4 0.95
Australia 4 5.71 0.00 4 0.95
India 0.00 3 0.85 3 0.71
Turkey 0.00 3 0.85 3 0.71
France 0.00 2 0.57 2 0.48
Columbia 0.00 1 0.28 1 0.24
Combined Total 70 100.00 351 100.00 421 100.00

7 The Maid is a Thai ghost film production for Netflix original. It is directed by Lee Thongkham, a famous Thai director with Hollywood work
experience from The Fate of The Furious and Spider-Man: Homecoming. The plot is about a poor village girl working as a maid for a wealthy family,
and she not only learns dark secrets of the family but also faces the ghost living in the family’s mansion (Bunnag, 2020; Jang, 2020).

8 (W. Homsangpradit, personal communication, September 29, 2020).
9 (K. Rithdee, personal communication, September 22, 2020; T. Waller, personal communication, October 16, 2020).

10 Lost is a critically acclaimed American drama television series that originally aired on ABC from September 22, 2004, to May 23, 2010, over six
seasons, comprising a total of 121 episodes (Lost, n.d.; VanDerWerff, 2019).
11 Logline refers to a brief summary of a television program or film, or book that states the central conflict of the story, providing the synopsis of the

story’s plot, enough to get investors interested and willing to fund the project.

P. Ramasoota and A. Kitikamdhorn

Telecommunications Policy 45 (2021) 102156

8

Netflix went into partnership with the National Federation of Motion Pictures and Contents Association (MPC) to support the local
entertainment industry affected by the pandemic crisis with the US$ 500,000 MPC COVID-19 Relief Fund for Film and TV Freelance
Production Personnel (The National Federation of Motion Pictures and Contents Associations, 2020). This gesture can be inferred that
Netflix sees Thailand as a potentially long-term market.

2. Netflix’s impacts on local economy and industries

Previous studies suggest that Netflix’s global expansion has caused tremendous changes and profound transformative impacts or
“the Netflix Effect” on worldwide media industry, technological infrastructure, policy agendas, and users’ mode of consumption
(Smith-Rowsey, 2016). At the macro level, economic impacts have been most noted. This must be understood within the overall
context of OTTs’ penetration of which Netflix is a part.

According to official statistics by the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC), the growth in tradi-
tional television market in recent years has slowed down in contrast to that of transnational OTT market (Office of The National
Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission, 2018). Fig. 4 below shows the overall TV revenue trend increasing only by 5 per
cent from 2018 to 2020 while that of OTTs has steadily risen by 17 per cent over the same period. Pay-TV subscription reportedly grew
by 6.7 per cent while TV advertising revenue grew only by 3.8 per cent. It is predicted that TV advertising will eventually become
stagnant and move to online platform. Meanwhile, more than 80 per cent of OTT revenue comes from advertsing based services such as
Facebook and YouTube. From 2019 to 2022, the SVoD growth is estimated at 22 per cent and AVoD growth at 15 per cent.12

Similarly, a report by the Digital Advertising Association Thailand’s (DAAT) indicates a growth in creative production sector13 from
2018 to 2019 and forecasts an increase in expentidure of online video advertising between 2019 and 2020 (Digital Advertising As-
sociation (Thailand), n.d.) (see Fig. 5). This implies a shift from television advertising to online realm, especially creative online video
industry.

Furthermore, a major opportunity cost may have been incurred in the absence of taxation levied on these prolific global OTTs.
According to a calculation by a local economist,14 an estimated US$4.375 million15 tax revenue could have been generated for the Thai
government if Netflix had been properly levied a value-added tax (VAT) on its local income from an estimate of 560,000 subscribers in
Thailand.

2.1. Broadcasting

At the industrial level, both television and film industries are disrupted by OTTs such as Netflix, albeit differently. The most obvious
impact on the broadcasting side lies in the fact that Netflix has been able to secure control in almost all units along the value chain of
OTT VoD (see Fig. 6). This is markedly different from the situation in the local digital TV value chain since there has not been such a
powerful player holding this dominant position in the market. Even in the online entertainment realm, Netflix also exerts a more
significant position than other providers. While audio platforms such as Apple’s iTunes or Spotify only aggregate music from artists
and creators, Netflix is in control of production, distribution and presentation of content. Netflix not only takes on the role of content
aggregator but also occupies other positions in the value chain including as content creator, investor in original content, and CDNs
provider. More importantly, the global streaming service also manipulates audience’s perception and viewing experience in the form
of content curation that appear on personal, national, and regional levels, as aforementioned.

More recently, as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic that gave rise to lockdown in several countries, Netflix has benefitted from a
growing audience and apparently higher revenues (Zeitchik, 2020). The global streaming service has announced a US$1 billion in-
vestment in new Netflix originals (Mukherjee, 2020; Zhao, 2020), thereby consolidating its global stronghold in content production.

In the Thai context, Netflix has acquired a great number of local content into its catalogues from local content providers, television
broadcasters, or movie studios. Such licensing agreement has effects in two directions. On the one hand, small broadcasters that are
also content producers find themselves in a compromising situation, having to adjust their content timetable to accommodate Netflix
which holds a more prevalent platform. This is exactly the case with True Visions, a digital TV operator, which had to postpone its
series debut to follow that of Netflix (OTT in the New Digital Economy, 2020). This is to avoid direct competition with the global
platform. On the other hand, content providers whose content have been licensed to stream on Netflix platform feel that they benefit
from capitalizing on the same content product, while expanding their audience’s base to international fronts.16

12 Statista’s estimation of Thai SVOD OTT market predicts similar trend—steady growth until 2025 (Statista, n.d.).
13 Creative production, according to the DAAT, covers “online video production, web banner production, application production, and service and

management” (Digital Advertising Association (Thailand), n.d.).
14 Anin Aroonruengsawat, Faculty of Economics, Thammasat University, presentation on Economic and Social Impacts of OTT on Broadcasting in

Thailand, a research result presentation, Office of National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC), Bangkok, Thailand, 23
November 2020.
15 These figures are based on the calculation that Netflix Thailand’s 560,000 local subscribers pay a minimum subscription fee of Bt279 or US$9.3

per month (Bt3,348 or US$111 per year). VAT is levied at seven per cent of the income which is estimated at US$62.5 million annually.
16 For example, according to Mr. Charkrit Direkwattanachai, Channel 3 Thailand’s EVP-Corporate Affairs, Channel 3 Thailand uses Netflix to

export their content in order to compensate a decline in advertising revenue from television broadcasting (C. Direkwattanachai, personal
communication, October 19, 2020).

P. Ramasoota and A. Kitikamdhorn

TelecommunicationsPolicy45
(2021)102156

9

Fig. 4. Comparison between growth in traditional TV revenue and OTTs’ revenue in Thailand (2018–2020).

P. R
am

asoota and A
.

Marketing homework help


Innovative Product Assignment

Assignments –Students will select a company to create a marketing plan for a new product concept that you believe offers the greatest ROI to your firm. Please keep in mind that this concept must be consistent with, or compliment, the existing mission of the company. Your written report and presentation slides must include the following sections:

1. Executive Summary of Your Plan

2. Company Background (company, history, line(s) of business, and industry it competes in)

3. SWOT Analysis

4. Strategic Analysis a) Mission, vision and core competencies/competitive advantages of your company/firm b) Description of your new product concept c) Goals and rationale behind the concept d) Alignment of concept with firm (how do they fit or complement each other?)

5. Competitive Analysis a) How is the market segmented? b) Who is the competition? c) Who is your target market? d) Why is it different from your competitors?

6. Marketing Mix a) Product (packaging, features, contents, flavors, size etc.) b) Place: distribution channel, extent of distribution, which methods and why did you choose them? c) Promotion: which method or combination of methods (advertising, PR, promotion, personal selling) did you choose and why, if advertising, which type of media and why? d) Pricing: what is your pricing strategy and your rationale?

7. Implementation Plan & Marketing Calendar: how will you roll out your product? How long will it take? Is it temporary or permanent?

Marketing homework help


Innovative Product Assignment

Assignments –Students will select a company to create a marketing plan for a new product concept that you believe offers the greatest ROI to your firm. Please keep in mind that this concept must be consistent with, or compliment, the existing mission of the company. Your written report and presentation slides must include the following sections:

1. Executive Summary of Your Plan

2. Company Background (company, history, line(s) of business, and industry it competes in)

3. SWOT Analysis

4. Strategic Analysis a) Mission, vision and core competencies/competitive advantages of your company/firm b) Description of your new product concept c) Goals and rationale behind the concept d) Alignment of concept with firm (how do they fit or complement each other?)

5. Competitive Analysis a) How is the market segmented? b) Who is the competition? c) Who is your target market? d) Why is it different from your competitors?

6. Marketing Mix a) Product (packaging, features, contents, flavors, size etc.) b) Place: distribution channel, extent of distribution, which methods and why did you choose them? c) Promotion: which method or combination of methods (advertising, PR, promotion, personal selling) did you choose and why, if advertising, which type of media and why? d) Pricing: what is your pricing strategy and your rationale?

7. Implementation Plan & Marketing Calendar: how will you roll out your product? How long will it take? Is it temporary or permanent?

Marketing homework help

Who Is Picking Up The Puffed Rice

Student Name

Consumer Behavior MKT305

Dr. Lisa Amans

Month Date Year

Who is Picking Up The Puffed Rice

Start the first paragraph here. In this first paragraph provide the name of the grocery store that you visited, the location of the store, the day you conducted your store visit and the time you conducted your store visit. Also tell us how long you were in the store.

Provide enough detail so it is clear what type of grocery store you visited. Describe the location with the address, city and state, in addition to the surrounding neighborhood of this store.

Consumer Observations in The Grocery Store Aisles

Start the second paragraph here. In this second paragraph describe the aisles where you observed your customer. What products were in these aisles? How quickly did the consumer move up and down each aisle? Was the customer on the phone? Make sure you observe the customer in at least two aisles. Where did they stop? What did they do when they stopped? Did they touch different products on the shelf? Which ones? How long did they stop to pick up different items? Did they read the ingredients or any other information on the package?

How Customers Determine Value

Start the third paragraph here. Make sure you observe two different customers. What did the customers look at while they were shopping? Was the customer on the phone? Did they look at the price? How quickly did they look at the price? Did they look at the size of the product? Did they do any calculations on the price per unit? Did the customers look for any sales?

Compare and Contrast Two Different Customers

Start the fourth paragraph here. Tell us about the two customers that you observed and how they are different. Provide as much detail as you can observe about these two different customers. Did they move through the store in the same way or did they progress through the store differently? Was the customer on the phone? If so, which one? Did they pick up the same or different products? Did they look at the value of each product the same way?

How do Manufacturers Motivate Customers

Start the fifth paragraph here. Was there any signage near the products that customer looked at? What type of signage was it? Were there displays at the end of the aisles that caught the customer’s attention? Did the customers look for coupons while they were shopping? Be as detailed and specific as you can.

Sources

1. Enter the first source entry here.

2. Enter the second source entry here.

3. Enter the third source entry here.

4. Enter the fourth source entry here.

Appendix

 

Customer 1 

Customer 2 

Customer Demographics 

(age gender race/ethnicity) 

 

 

Presence of Shopping Companion (Yes/No, How many) 

 

 

Product Aisles Observed 

 

 

 

Customer Shopping Behavior 

 

 

 

Customer Movement Through Aisles 

 

 

 

Merchandise Picked up by Customer 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Marketing homework help

2

Sport Marketing

Fourth Edition

Bernard J. Mullin, PhD

Aspire Group

Stephen Hardy, PhD

University of New Hampshire

William A. Sutton, EdD

University of South Florida

Human Kinetics

3

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Mullin, Bernard James.

Sport marketing / Bernard J. Mullin, Stephen Hardy, William A. Sutton. — Fourth edition.

pages cm

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Sports–Marketing. I. Hardy, Stephen, 1948- II. Sutton, William Anthony, 1951- III. Title.

GV716.M85 2014

338.4’3796–dc23

2013031098

ISBN-10: 1-4504-2498-8 (print)

ISBN-13: 978-1-4504-2498-1 (print)

Copyright © 2014, 2007, 2000, 1993 by Bernard J. Mullin, Stephen Hardy, and William A. Sutton

All rights reserved. Except for use in a review, the reproduction or utilization of this work in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented,
including xerography, photocopying, and recording, and in any information storage and retrieval system, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher.

The web addresses cited in this text were current as of December 2013, unless otherwise noted.

Acquisitions Editor: Myles Schrag

Developmental Editor: Amanda S. Ewing

Assistant Editor: Casey A. Gentis

Copyeditor: Bob Replinger

Indexer: Andrea J. Hepner

Permissions Manager: Dalene Reeder

Graphic Designer: Nancy Rasmus

Graphic Artist: Dawn Sills

Cover Designer: Keith Blomberg

Photograph (cover): Layne Murdoch/NBAE via Getty Images

Photo Asset Manager: Laura Fitch

Photo Production Manager: Jason Allen

Art Manager: Kelly Hendren

Associate Art Manager: Alan L. Wilborn

Illustrations: © Human Kinetics, unless otherwise noted

Printer: Courier Companies, Inc.

Printed in the United States of America

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The paper in this book was manufactured using responsible forestry methods.

Human Kinetics

Website: www.HumanKinetics.com

United States: Human Kinetics

P.O. Box 5076

Champaign, IL 61825-5076

800-747-4457

e-mail: humank@hkusa.com

Canada: Human Kinetics

475 Devonshire Road Unit 100

Windsor, ON N8Y 2L5

800-465-7301 (in Canada only)

e-mail: info@hkcanada.com

Europe: Human Kinetics

107 Bradford Road

Stanningley

Leeds LS28 6AT, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 113 255 5665

e-mail: hk@hkeurope.com

Australia: Human Kinetics

4

57A Price Avenue

Lower Mitcham, South Australia 5062

08 8372 0999

e-mail: info@hkaustralia.com

New Zealand: Human Kinetics

P.O. Box 80

Torrens Park, South Australia 5062

0800 222 062

e-mail: info@hknewzealand.com

E5690

5

Check Out the Web Study Guide!
You will notice a reference throughout this version of Sport Marketing, Fourth Edition, to a web study guide.
This resource is available to supplement your e-book.

The web study guide features exclusive video interviews with leaders in the sport industry, offering insight into
how they incorporate marketing strategies into their daily work. Activities built around these clips guide you
in using core concepts from the text to answer questions about the applied situations in the interviews. Web
search activities also provide opportunities for you to compare strategies found on sport organization websites,
YouTube, and other online locations.

Follow these steps to purchase access to the web study guide:

1. Visit www.tinyurl.com/BuySportMarketing4EWSG.
2. Click the Add to Cart button and complete the purchase process.
3. After you have successfully completed your purchase, visit the book’s website at

www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.
4. Click the fourth edition link next to the corresponding fourth edition book cover.
5. Click the Sign In link on the left or top of the page and enter the e-mail address and password that you

used during the purchase process. Once you sign in, your online product will appear in the Ancillary
Items box. Click on the title of the web study guide to access it.

6. Once purchased, a link to your product will permanently appear in the menu on the left. All you need to
do to access your web study guide on subsequent visits is sign in to
www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing and follow the link!

Click the Need Help? button on the book’s website if you need assistance along the way.

6

Guy Maxton Lewis, 1926-2013

Photo courtesy of Special Collections and Archives, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

We dedicate this book to the memory and legacy of Professor Guy M. Lewis, a true genius and visionary. Guy
was a key founder and builder of undergraduate and graduate programs in sport studies and sport
management at both the University of Massachusetts and the University of South Carolina. Throughout his
long and active career, he constantly searched for ways to integrate the theoretical with the practical, scholars
with practitioners. His professional contributions include the North American Society for Sport History, the
Sport Management Arts and Sciences Conferences at UMass, and the International Sports Business
Conferences at South Carolina. We happily consider ourselves among the many students, colleagues, and
professional associates who have benefitted from his wisdom and counsel. He will be missed. His
contributions will endure.

7

Contents
Contributors

Foreword

Preface
Web Study Guide
Instructor Resources

Acknowledgments

Chapter 1: The Special Nature of Sport Marketing
The NBA and Global Marketing Strategy
Weathering Recessions
The Competitive Marketplace
Sport Marketing Defined
Marketing Myopia in Sport
Change in the Profession
Uniqueness of Sport Marketing
Wrap-Up

Chapter 2: Strategic Marketing Management
Sport Strategy Is More Than Locker Room Talk
Marketing Planning Process
Strategic Step 1: Develop Vision, Position, and Purpose
Strategic Step 2: Develop Strategic Goals and Objectives
Strategic Step 3: Develop a Ticket Marketing, Sales, and Service Plan
Strategic Step 4: Integrate the Marketing Plan Into a Broader, Strategic Resource Allocation
Strategic Step 5: Control and Evaluate Implementation of the Plan
Eight-Point Ticket Marketing, Sales, and Service Plan Model
Wrap-Up

Chapter 3: Understanding the Sport Consumer
Socialization, Involvement, and Commitment
Environmental Factors
Individual Factors
Decision Making
Wrap-Up

Chapter 4: Market Research in the Sport Industry
Sources of Information
Users of Market Research in Sport and Entertainment
Application of Market Research in the Sport Industry
Performing the Right Research
Wrap-Up

Chapter 5: Market Segmentation
What Is Market Segmentation?
Four Bases of Segmentation
Integrated Segmentation Strategies and Tactics
Wrap-Up

8

Chapter 6: The Sport Product
What Is the Sport Product?
The Sport Product: Its Core and Extensions
Grassroots Ideas
Key Issues in Sport Product Strategy
Wrap-Up

Chapter 7: Managing Sport Brands
What Is Branding?
Importance of Brand Equity
Benefits of Brand Equity
How Brand Equity Is Developed
Wrap-Up

Chapter 8: Sales and Service
Relationship Between Media, Sponsors, and Fans and the Sales Process
What Is Sales?
Direct Data-Based Sport Marketing and Sales
Typical Sales Approaches Used in Sport
Pricing Basics
Secondary Ticket Market
Aftermarketing, Lifetime Value, and the Importance of Retaining Customers
Wrap-Up

Chapter 9: Sponsorship, Corporate Partnerships, and the Role of Activation
What Is Sponsorship?
Sponsorship in the Marketing Mix
Growth of Sponsorship
What Does Sport Sponsorship Have to Offer?
Corporate Objectives
Sponsor Activation
Selling Sponsorships
Ethical Issues in Sponsorship
Wrap-Up

Chapter 10: Promotion and Paid Media
The Catchall P: Promotion
Advertising
Advertising Media for Sport
Promotional Concepts and Practices
Promotional Components
Ultimate Goal: Keeping Consumers on the Escalator and Moving Them Up
Putting It All Together: An Integrated Promotional Model
Wrap-Up

Chapter 11: Public Relations
What Is Public Relations?
Public Relations in the Sport Marketing Mix
Sport Public Relations in the Digital Age
Public Relations Functions
Sport, Television, and Entertainment Influence on Sport Public Relations
Wrap-Up

Chapter 12: Social Media in Sport
What Is Social Media?

9

Building an Audience
Engaging Fans
Driving Behavior
Social Media Platforms
Avoiding Pitfalls
Leveraging Players and Talent
Wrap-Up

Chapter 13: Delivering and Distributing Core Products and Extensions
Placing Core Products and Their Extensions
Theory of Sport and Place
Facility
Marketing Channels
Product-Place Matrix
Wrap-Up

Chapter 14: Legal Aspects of Sport Marketing
Intellectual Property
Trademark Infringement
Copyright Law and Sport Marketing
Patents
Sport Marketing Communications Issues
Ambush Marketing
Right of Publicity and Invasion of Privacy
Contractual Issues Involving Consumers
Promotion Law Issues
Emerging Issues
Wrap-Up

Chapter 15: Putting It All Together
Cross-Effects Among the Five Ps
Controlling the Marketing Function
Wrap-Up

Chapter 16: The Shape of Things to Come
From Our Crystal Ball
From Our Crystal Ball Redux: By the Year 2020
Wrap-Up

About the Authors

10

Contributors
Leigh Buwen

Manager of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Kathy Connors

Principal and Founder

KMC Consulting, LLC

Kirsten Corio

Vice President, Team Marketing and Business Operations

NBA

Jaclyn Cranston

Senior Manager of Sales and Service

Turnkey Intelligence

Evelyn Dwyer

Manager of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Jay Gladden

Dean and Professor

School of Physical Education and Tourism Management

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis

John Grady

Associate Professor

University of South Carolina

Haynes Hendrickson

11

President

Turnkey Intelligence

Steve McKelvey, JD

Associate Professor

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Nikolay Panchev

Vice President of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Steve Seiferheld

Senior Vice President of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

12

Foreword
As my 30 years as NBA commissioner comes to an end, I can’t help but reminisce about just how far the sport
industry has come during this period. Perhaps nowhere is this growth more evident than in sport marketing.
It is hard to believe that just 30 years ago when the authors of Sport Marketing, Fourth Edition, wrote their
original manuscript, the term sport marketing was rarely used. Now, the term is common and regularly used
to encompass all of the activities in this book—activities that accurately depict the evolution of the sport
industry as I have experienced it during my tenure at the NBA. I have had the good fortune of working with
many of the most talented executives in the industry. As the industry has evolved, so have the leadership and
business capabilities of the teams. Now, most of our teams have more than 100 employees who sell tickets and
sponsorships; provide great customer service; develop marketing, advertising, and branding strategies; activate
platforms for marketing partners and sponsors to drive their businesses; produce TV and radio broadcasts
locally; service the media and place proactive messages; develop and produce the shows; and do meaningful
work in the community through innovative and socially responsible programs. This latest edition continues to
place those activities in a comprehensive framework, showing how the moving parts work together to develop
the sport business locally, nationally, and globally; and it refreshingly illustrates where the use of new
technologies now play their essential part. Particularly insightful are the data collection, aggregation, delivery,
and targeting technologies used in ticket marketing and sales and for increasing fan engagement using content
delivered predominantly via mobile devices.

The principal authors have a combination of academic and professional experience that is extraordinary. Their
education and experience as university professors provide them with unique perspectives. Their research and
analytical skills lead to objectivity and an ability to identify key industry needs. The theoretical framework
they have created into which every marketing strategy is set—the marketing planning process—leads to a
consistency in all branding, sales, and marketing strategies. Better yet, the authors have practical experience in
the field in senior executive capacities covering several segments of the sport industry, which has given them a
wealth of knowledge on best practices and the understanding of what actually works and what doesn’t.
Collectively, they have implemented just about all of the best practices firsthand for leagues, sport conferences,
and the most challenging of all situations, start-up teams and turnarounds.

I have observed the work of the authors for almost fifteen years as they contributed to the way NBA teams
conduct their business. Clearly the most significant contributions were the substantial increase in the sharing
of best practices and real data, increased adoption of direct marketing techniques, focus on the customer
“driveway to driveway” experience, and the basis of teams’ business strategies on the authors’ landmark work—
the attendance frequency escalator. As a result, most NBA teams today have much more sophisticated
database-building and customer relationship management (CRM) capabilities. The teams more effectively use
proactive outbound fan relationship management centers or telemarketing sales and intelligently targeted e-
marketing programs that are designed to increase trial, improve retention, and drive attendance. These
successful teams focus on the stepping-stone approach to fan development: Encourage more people
(particularly youth) to play the game, connect players and coaches more favorably with the community, get

13

more fans to watch or listen to broadcasts, progressively encourage fans to get off the couch or off the
computer or mobile device and sample the NBA game in person, and offer a full menu of full- and partial-
season ticket plans designed to move fans up the attendance frequency escalator. The greatest benefit of this
approach has been a significant increase in the lifetime value (LTV) of fans in the respective team markets,
and ultimately, the league itself.

Mixing in their unique intellect and personalities, the authors use their vast academic and practical experience
to make this book a must-read for future generations of sport marketers, managers, and perhaps even
commissioners in their “retirement.”

David J. Stern

Commissioner, National Basketball Association

14

Preface
There is only one way to describe the massive changes in the sport world since the first edition of Sport
Marketing came out in 1993: “Holy cow!” as the late Harry Caray always put it. In 1993 most people would
have thought that the Internet was a spy ring and that a web page was something in a newsletter of Ducks
Unlimited. When our second edition appeared in 2000, the Internet was old hat, but it was still the most
innovative medium of the age. File sharing was just beginning in 2000. And what of the concept of social
media? In 2000 Internet nerds would have thought that YouTube was a phrase deriding old media. Hardly.
By 2007 YouTube.com had become the hottest site on the Internet. More than a million video clips were
viewed each day, many of them sporting events. In 2014 we can add Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other
social media as both products and experiences that have transformed the way that consumers engage sport.
And just about everything has gone wireless, especially with the explosive growth of smartphones. Marketers
have adapted. Executives throughout the sport world get their industry news and data through online services
such as SportsBusinessDaily.com and SBRnet.com, and trade publications, such as Street & Smith’s
SportsBusiness Journal and Athletic Business, have online versions. But they all employ social media and wireless
technologies to gather and dispense information. We have incorporated many of the latest marketing ideas in
this edition, but new products and services are emerging daily.

Some things haven’t changed much. The competition for the sport and entertainment dollar is as heavy as
ever. Sport marketing is a competitive business involving as much front-office strategy, risk, discipline, and
energy as that shown by the players and coaches who figure so prominently in the public’s imagination. The
fourth edition of Sport Marketing offers abundant examples of the latest issues in the competitive marketplace.

As academics, we have been studying changes in the sport industry for over 40 years, long before Forbes and
Fortune began to take sport seriously with regular coverage. When we started out as graduate students in the
early 1970s, few scholars were willing to accept sport as a serious topic of study. Now leading academics in
marketing, management, law, and economics (to name only a few disciplines) are rushing headlong for book
contracts on sport. We have both followed and helped build this growing body of literature. More important,
each of us has also worked inside the industry, trying to make sense of the ways that fans, players, coaches, the
media, equipment companies, and others interact to make the game tick. We have planned, administered, or
consulted on literally thousands of events across just about every sport considered mainstream and at just
about every level. This book emanates from our own fusion of experience as academics and practitioners. We
have written a survey that we hope is as useful for the classroom student as it is for the athletics director of a
college or high school or the marketer of a professional franchise.

We have tried to balance theoretical models with case studies from the rinks, fields, courts, slopes, gyms,
tracks, and other venues that make up the sport marketplace. If theory is the skeleton that gives structure to
thinking, then case studies put meat on the bones. Although most of our examples are from the United States,
we have added considerable material from sports in other countries and cultures.

15

\INSERT bookstore e-book icon here\

Readers of past editions will find both continuity and change in this book. Chapters 1 through 3 provide an
overview of the sport market and sport marketing as an area of study and as a process. Chapters 4 (by Haynes
Hendrickson, Steve Seiferheld, Nikolay Panchev, Jaclyn Cranston, Leigh Buwen, and Evelyn Dwyer of
Turnkey) and 5 consider conceptual tools and steps of preliminary market research and market segmentation,
which are critical to overcoming a tendency to equate promotions with marketing. Chapters 6 through 13
explore the nuts and bolts of marketing plans—the five Ps of sport marketing: product, price, promotion,
place, and public relations. But these Ps are conceptually robust, so readers will note special chapters or
chapter sections on branding (Jay Gladden), sales and service, engagement and activation, community
relations (Kathy Connors), and social media (Kirsten Corio). The last three chapters offer some important
elements on legal issues (Steve McKelvey and John Grady), control, evaluation, and projecting the future. The
book is filled with sidebars written by other industry and academic leaders. We thank them all for their
contributions.

The world of sport marketing continues to challenge and excite us. We only hope that this edition is as
enjoyable to read as it was to write.

16

Web Study Guide

A new and exciting addition to the fourth edition is the web study guide (WSG), which gives students the
opportunity to listen to sport industry leaders talk about how they incorporate marketing strategies into their
daily work through exclusive video clips produced by David Perricone, who has experience as an academic and
practitioner. Activities are built around these video clips, asking students to do what these industry experts
already do: integrate core concepts and strategies from the textbook into applied situations.

Besides the video-based exercises, the web study guide has web search activities in which students will assess
and compare strategies that can be found on sport organization websites, YouTube, and other online
locations. These two activity types ensure that students will have even more opportunity to engage in the
material found in these pages. Throughout the book, students are directed to the web study guide with cross-
references like this:

Activity 1.2 The Global Marketing Strategy

College sport marketing has traditionally been centered in the United States. In this WSG
activity, you will learn how a globalized marketplace is changing college sports.

The web study guide is available at www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.

17

Instructor Resources

A full array of instructor resources are available:

Presentation package plus image bank: The presentation package includes more than 400 slides that
cover the key points from the text, including 30 select figures and tables. Instructors can easily add new
slides to the presentation package to suit their needs. The image bank includes all the figures and tables
from the book, separated by chapter. These items can be added to the presentation package, student
handouts, and so on.
Instructor guide: The instructor guide includes a sample syllabus and ideas for semester-long activities
and case studies. Individual chapter-by-chapter files include a chapter summary, chapter objectives,
chapter outline, and classroom ideas, which include the suggestion of case studies from the online
journal Case Studies in Sport Management.
Test package: The test package includes more than 200 questions in true–false, multiple-choice, fill-in-
the-blank, and short-answer formats. These questions are available in multiple formats for a variety of
instructor uses and can be used to create tests and quizzes to measure student understanding.
Chapter quizzes: New to the fourth edition are chapter quizzes. These LMS-compatible, ready-made
quizzes can be used to measure student learning of the most important concepts for each chapter. More
than 150 questions (8 to 10 questions per chapter) are included in true–false, multiple-choice, fill-in-
the-blank, and short-answer formats.

Instructors can access these ancillaries by visiting www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.

18

Acknowledgments
Our chapter notes acknowledge the sources that we have used. In addition, we offer special acknowledgments
to a number of people. The first is David Stern, one of the premier sport marketing minds in the world. We
thank David for giving two of us the opportunity to work in the NBA as well as for sharing his insights and
providing daily inspiration through his strategic marketing initiatives. We also recognize the contributions
and value of the late Bill Veeck, whose writings and innovations continually remind us of the importance of
the fans and sport consumer behavior. Likewise, we appreciate Mike Veeck because he has done the same and
has forced us to examine our own practices and approaches when we forget about the fans. On the academic
side, we are indebted to Philip Kotler for his numerous contributions to the field of marketing, which have
influenced our thinking in terms of sport marketing. We have dedicated this edition to Dr. Guy Lewis, who
has been instrumental in shaping the academic coursework and program content for many of the
undergraduate and graduate programs in sport management. Matt Levine of SourceUSA, one of the original
and leading sport marketing consultants who helped shape the study of sport consumer behavior, has also
continued to inspire our thinking. We acknowledge the many academics who contribute to Sport Marketing
Quarterly and are members of the Sport Marketing Association (SMA). The research of our academic
colleagues and their tireless preparation of the sport marketers of tomorrow provide constant inspiration and
motivation to us.

We also offer special thanks to our chapter and sidebar contributors: Melissa Rosenthal Brenner, Leigh
Buwen, Ward Bullard, William Carafello, Catherine Carlson, Leigh Castergine, Kathy Connors, Kirsten
Corio, Jaclyn Cranston, Lou DePaoli, Ari de Wilde, Evelyn Dwyer, Jay Gladden, John Grady, Shane
Harmon, Adam Haukap, Chris Heck, Haynes Hendrickson, Jeff Ianello, Dae Hee Kwak, Amber Lilyestrom,
Jordan Maleh, Amy Jo Martin, Steve McKelvey, Brian Norman, Nikolay Panchev, Dave Perricone, Sarah
Sceery, Jared Schoenfeld, Susan Schroeder, Steve Seiferheld, Chad Seifried, Dr. Alan Seymour, Peter
Stringer, Jennifer Tobias, and Eric Woolworth.

Many other people helped us obtain, organize, and develop materials for the book. Mia Ramer, Madison
Southerlin, and Ben Holmes at the Aspire Group did research work to update data on participation,
demographics, and other sidebar facts. University of South Florida graduate students Kristine Carcione, Kayla
Chesanek, Katie Hatch and Amanda Puccinell also contributed their expertise. Abe Madkour and the staff at
SportsBusiness Daily (now an essential resource for anyone trying to make sense of the sport industry) have
been ever gracious with their help and permissions. Abe also contributed his views on the future in our last
chapter. Others who have given constant support and inspiration include Dot Sheehan, Steve Metcalf, and
Marty Scarano of the University of New Hampshire and Roger Godin of the Minnesota Wild. Thanks also to
Kirstin Kay and Tanya Downey at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst for providing us with the picture
of Guy Lewis on the dedication page.

This book could not have been done without the help and dedication of our editors from Human Kinetics—
Myles Schrag and Amanda Ewing. They whipped us, encouraged us, and coddled us as the time and case

19

required. They are outstanding professionals.

In our capacities as sport administrators and consultants, we have worked with hundreds of dedicated
executives, marketers, coaches, salespersons, customer service professionals, public and community relations
personnel, and sports information directors who have inspired us with their energy, dedication, and passion.
As academics, we thank and salute our colleagues and students over the years at the University of
Washington, Robert Morris University, Ohio State University, the University of Massachusetts, the
University of New Hampshire, the University of Central Florida, and the University of South Florida. These
colleagues and students have challenged, stretched, reshaped, and indulged our thinking on all the topics in
this book. We hope that we can convey to our readers their wisdom, their enthusiasm, their wonder for
learning, and their passion for moving the field forward.

20

Chapter 1
The Special Nature of Sport Marketing

© Human Kinetics

21

Objectives
To understand the market forces that create the need for enlightened marketing strategies in the
sport industry
To understand marketing myopia and other obstacles to successful marketing strategy
To recognize the components of the sport product and the sport industry
To recognize the factors that demand a different approach to the marketing of sport

22

Linsanity and the Global Sport Marketplace

Sports Illustrated was clear in its assessment: “Nothing, anywhere, has ever resembled the ascendance of
Jeremy Shu-How Lin, a legend seemingly pulled from the imagination of a goose-fleshed David Stern,
if not Disney’s most hyperbolic global marketing exec.” And this was only five games into Linsanity or
Linmania or . . . Linmarketing. Overlooked out of Palo Alto High School, taunted with racial slurs
while playing at Harvard, undrafted and twice cast off by NBA teams, Lin made the most of his
February 2012 chance with the New York Knicks. He was an early Valentine gift for his team, for
Madison Square Garden, for the NBA, for the world of basketball, and for sports fans everywhere. Oh,
and don’t forget marketers. Nine games into the drama, Lin had led the Knicks to an 8-1 record as he
threw up all-star numbers by averaging 25 points, 9.2 assists, and 3.8 rebounds per game. Both Lin and
the Knicks cooled off a tad by the All-Star break at month’s end. By mid-March they had suffered a
losing streak that mirrored the earlier run of wins. The team changed coaches. And then Lin went down
with a season-ending injury, fueling an equally strong conversation with a long lineage in sport. Would
he last in the league, or would he flame out? In July 2012 the Houston Rockets ensured the story’s

extension when they signed free agent Lin to a three-year, $25.1 million deal.1

Time would tell whether Jeremy Lin endured in the NBA. But action on the court was only half the
story. Linsanity, regardless of how long or short the run, offered a miniseries on the world of sport
marketing in the early 21st century. Jeremy Lin was both a player and a product to be branded,
monetized, and distributed in a global system. He embodied key ingredients of the successful sport

brands of the era.2

Stickiness

Jeremy Lin and his performance held the public’s imagination because they contained all the elements
that Chip and Dan Heath claimed were crucial to the “stickiness” of any product or idea:

Simplicity—Basketball statistics are simple. Unlike the economy or the political landscape,
basketball did not require observers to unravel or parse complicated formulas or polls in
considering Lin’s performance.
Unexpectedness—Few basketball experts predicted that Lin would even play in the NBA, let alone
be a phenomenon.
Concreteness—No conceptual fuzziness was involved in watching a YouTube clip of Lin
highlights.
Credibility—This question would loom large over time, as it does with every player in every sport,
at every level. Jeremy Lin was the real deal in February 2012. Would he hold up?
Emotion—One look at the way Lin played or the way that fans responded in Madison Square
Garden revealed great depth of emotion.
Narrativity—Lin’s background, his struggle to succeed, and his triumph (however brief) were the

23

fodder for endless stories.

International Reach

As with David Beckham in world football and Alex Ovechkin in ice hockey, stories about Jeremy Lin
played up his following across continents, in this case to China. One mid-February report from China
noted that “The clearest sign that Jeremy Lin’s appeal has spanned the Pacific to mainland China may
lie not in the 1.4 million Chinese microblog [Twitter-like] messages mentioning him in recent days, but
in a rare failure to meet demand here in the heart of one of the world’s largest centers of pirated garment
manufacturing.” As one store clerk near Shanghai noted tellingly, “His jerseys have sold out, even
including the counterfeit ones.” A Chines

Marketing homework help

2


logo-son copy


Southern States University

The Undersigned Faculty Approves the

Professional Applied Project of

___________________________________________

Student Name

___________________________________________

Project Title

This student has met the requirements for the Professional Applied Project. I can therefore recommend this student for an MBA degree.

Dr. Peggy G. Bilbruck, EdD

Faculty Name

___________________________________________

Faculty Signature

___________________________________________

Approval Date

Name of Your Business

Your Name

Southern States University

2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


This section should give an overview including the business name and physical location along with the below items. This section is due in Week 7. (Delete this content for submission).

Business Name and Location

Products/Services

Mission

Vision

COMPANY DESCRIPTION

This section is due in Week 3, make sure it is complete with all sections done. (Delete this content for submission).

History of Interest in Business Idea

Legal Structure

You need to choose the type of structure that you will have for your business. Review the Week One Legal Structure Power Point in the Student Resources Materials to review the various structures. (Delete this content for submission)

Core Competencies


Core Competencies are a unique ability that a company acquires from its founders or develops and that cannot easily be imitated. Core competencies are what give a company one or more competitive advantages, in creating and delivering value to its customers in its chosen field. (Delete this content before submission).

Short-Term and Long-Term Business Goals

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

This section is due in Week 3, make sure it is complete with all sections done. (Delete this content for submission).

Product and Service Description

Pictures and Diagrams

Customer Benefits

Copyright or Patent Information

Research and Development Activities

MARKET ANALYSIS

This section is due in Week 5, make sure it is complete with all sections done. (Delete this content for submission).

Market Knowledge and Analysis

Go to the library database and use Statista to gather data on the industry. Make the paper interesting and include graphs and charts to show the viability of the industry. (Delete this content for submission).

Target Market

Identify the target market and make sure to include demographics such as age, gender, marital status, annual income etc. Be very specific. (Delete this content for submission).

Competitive Analysis

You must identify two competitors and compare your business to their businesses in the chart below. (Delete this content for submission).

(Your Company)

Competitor

Competitor

Overview:

Overview:

Overview:

Additional value:

Additional value:

Additional value:

Details:

Details:

Details:

Cost:

Cost:

Cost:

Barriers to Entry

Identify things that would make it difficult for you to successfully enter the market. Examples would be competition, price, regulations, etc. (Delete the content for submission).

STRATEGY AND IMPLEMENTATION

This section is due in Week 5, make sure it is complete with all sections done. (Delete this content for submission).

Sales and Marketing Strategy

Identify in detail how you will market and sell your products/services. Include cost for the marketing aspect of the business. (Delete this content for submission).

Promotion Mix

Promotion Costs

Product or Service Pricing

Operations Cycle

Identify your hours of operation. If you are a physical business then you will want to include a sample work schedule to show that you have adequate coverage for your location. (Delete this content for submission).

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

This section is due in Week 3, make sure it is complete with all sections done. (Delete this content for submission).

Company Organizational Structure

Five Year Plan for Your Business

Leadership Style and Management Perspective

CONCLUSION

FINANCIAL PLAN AND PROJECTIONS

This section is due in Week 7, make sure it is complete with all financial spreadsheets. (Delete this content for submission).

REFERENCES

Marketing homework help

THE JOURNAL

The Journal is a document whereby individuals use the course material to evaluate their own
experiences and observations in an organizational setting. I prefer the use of your own current
employment for the journals. It is not acceptable to use second- hand situations (e.g., spouse,
friend- of- a- friend). By the same token, events should not be excessively dated. The latter may
be open to negotiation.

The content of the journal entries must address the three criteria below.

Objective I: The paper must “describe” the situation or practice to which a concept will be
applied. Best are current as yet unresolved issues. Next best would be immediately recent events.
The rest of the paper will be dedicated to showing how violation of or adherence to the course
concepts created a particular experience or pattern of experiences. You will need to give a
narrative illustration of the event. Be sure to provide enough “hard facts” to give the reader a
picture. Be careful not to provide so much that you do not stay focused on your chosen topic, or
that one begins to get lost in the trees. But do not be so generic or ambiguous that one does not
feel familiar with the situation. “Sufficient data” typically means the use of people and specific
behaviors as illustration. Later sections will use the concept to analyze why the situation exists,
and possibly what went wrong.

Objective II: The paper must “explain” the situation or experience. I anticipate each class session
will provide two or more “key learnings.” These issues may be enlightened self-awareness, a
labeling of previous knowledge, a realization of the importance of a previous event, or something
completely new. You will identify the key learnings to be used for the journal. You should
reference the dates of the class; the discussion topics, exercises, or readings that you will be
utilizing; and the theoretical objectives of the topic. Advice here is to consider both class and
reading material.

You will apply the course to the selected incident. The objectives here are to demonstrate your
familiarity with the concepts in two ways. On the one hand you will show your learning through
your ability to present the concept, while showing your understanding of the concepts through
their application to the situation. The major emphasis here is on using the course material to
show why the situation occurred; how the material helps you understand how and why it
occurred, and how this reflection has enlightened your understanding of human resource
management. This objective is critical to your grade. Objective I above is the story/description
aspect of the paper, while this objective addresses the analysis aspect.

Objective III: In building on your prior analysis, the paper should extrapolate your learning
towards human resources improvement. Using your discussion up to this point, consider ways
you could embark on using the “key learnings” to better the situation and/or the organization.
You should also use this section to develop specific action plans to guide your improvement
strategy.

Marketing homework help

Who Is Picking Up The Puffed Rice

Student Name

Consumer Behavior MKT305

Dr. Lisa Amans

Month Date Year

Who is Picking Up The Puffed Rice

Start the first paragraph here. In this first paragraph provide the name of the grocery store that you visited, the location of the store, the day you conducted your store visit and the time you conducted your store visit. Also tell us how long you were in the store.

Provide enough detail so it is clear what type of grocery store you visited. Describe the location with the address, city and state, in addition to the surrounding neighborhood of this store.

Consumer Observations in The Grocery Store Aisles

Start the second paragraph here. In this second paragraph describe the aisles where you observed your customer. What products were in these aisles? How quickly did the consumer move up and down each aisle? Was the customer on the phone? Make sure you observe the customer in at least two aisles. Where did they stop? What did they do when they stopped? Did they touch different products on the shelf? Which ones? How long did they stop to pick up different items? Did they read the ingredients or any other information on the package?

How Customers Determine Value

Start the third paragraph here. Make sure you observe two different customers. What did the customers look at while they were shopping? Was the customer on the phone? Did they look at the price? How quickly did they look at the price? Did they look at the size of the product? Did they do any calculations on the price per unit? Did the customers look for any sales?

Compare and Contrast Two Different Customers

Start the fourth paragraph here. Tell us about the two customers that you observed and how they are different. Provide as much detail as you can observe about these two different customers. Did they move through the store in the same way or did they progress through the store differently? Was the customer on the phone? If so, which one? Did they pick up the same or different products? Did they look at the value of each product the same way?

How do Manufacturers Motivate Customers

Start the fifth paragraph here. Was there any signage near the products that customer looked at? What type of signage was it? Were there displays at the end of the aisles that caught the customer’s attention? Did the customers look for coupons while they were shopping? Be as detailed and specific as you can.

Sources

1. Enter the first source entry here.

2. Enter the second source entry here.

3. Enter the third source entry here.

4. Enter the fourth source entry here.

Appendix

 

Customer 1 

Customer 2 

Customer Demographics 

(age gender race/ethnicity) 

 

 

Presence of Shopping Companion (Yes/No, How many) 

 

 

Product Aisles Observed 

 

 

 

Customer Shopping Behavior 

 

 

 

Customer Movement Through Aisles 

 

 

 

Merchandise Picked up by Customer 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Marketing homework help

2

Sport Marketing

Fourth Edition

Bernard J. Mullin, PhD

Aspire Group

Stephen Hardy, PhD

University of New Hampshire

William A. Sutton, EdD

University of South Florida

Human Kinetics

3

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Mullin, Bernard James.

Sport marketing / Bernard J. Mullin, Stephen Hardy, William A. Sutton. — Fourth edition.

pages cm

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Sports–Marketing. I. Hardy, Stephen, 1948- II. Sutton, William Anthony, 1951- III. Title.

GV716.M85 2014

338.4’3796–dc23

2013031098

ISBN-10: 1-4504-2498-8 (print)

ISBN-13: 978-1-4504-2498-1 (print)

Copyright © 2014, 2007, 2000, 1993 by Bernard J. Mullin, Stephen Hardy, and William A. Sutton

All rights reserved. Except for use in a review, the reproduction or utilization of this work in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented,
including xerography, photocopying, and recording, and in any information storage and retrieval system, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher.

The web addresses cited in this text were current as of December 2013, unless otherwise noted.

Acquisitions Editor: Myles Schrag

Developmental Editor: Amanda S. Ewing

Assistant Editor: Casey A. Gentis

Copyeditor: Bob Replinger

Indexer: Andrea J. Hepner

Permissions Manager: Dalene Reeder

Graphic Designer: Nancy Rasmus

Graphic Artist: Dawn Sills

Cover Designer: Keith Blomberg

Photograph (cover): Layne Murdoch/NBAE via Getty Images

Photo Asset Manager: Laura Fitch

Photo Production Manager: Jason Allen

Art Manager: Kelly Hendren

Associate Art Manager: Alan L. Wilborn

Illustrations: © Human Kinetics, unless otherwise noted

Printer: Courier Companies, Inc.

Printed in the United States of America

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The paper in this book was manufactured using responsible forestry methods.

Human Kinetics

Website: www.HumanKinetics.com

United States: Human Kinetics

P.O. Box 5076

Champaign, IL 61825-5076

800-747-4457

e-mail: humank@hkusa.com

Canada: Human Kinetics

475 Devonshire Road Unit 100

Windsor, ON N8Y 2L5

800-465-7301 (in Canada only)

e-mail: info@hkcanada.com

Europe: Human Kinetics

107 Bradford Road

Stanningley

Leeds LS28 6AT, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 113 255 5665

e-mail: hk@hkeurope.com

Australia: Human Kinetics

4

57A Price Avenue

Lower Mitcham, South Australia 5062

08 8372 0999

e-mail: info@hkaustralia.com

New Zealand: Human Kinetics

P.O. Box 80

Torrens Park, South Australia 5062

0800 222 062

e-mail: info@hknewzealand.com

E5690

5

Check Out the Web Study Guide!
You will notice a reference throughout this version of Sport Marketing, Fourth Edition, to a web study guide.
This resource is available to supplement your e-book.

The web study guide features exclusive video interviews with leaders in the sport industry, offering insight into
how they incorporate marketing strategies into their daily work. Activities built around these clips guide you
in using core concepts from the text to answer questions about the applied situations in the interviews. Web
search activities also provide opportunities for you to compare strategies found on sport organization websites,
YouTube, and other online locations.

Follow these steps to purchase access to the web study guide:

1. Visit www.tinyurl.com/BuySportMarketing4EWSG.
2. Click the Add to Cart button and complete the purchase process.
3. After you have successfully completed your purchase, visit the book’s website at

www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.
4. Click the fourth edition link next to the corresponding fourth edition book cover.
5. Click the Sign In link on the left or top of the page and enter the e-mail address and password that you

used during the purchase process. Once you sign in, your online product will appear in the Ancillary
Items box. Click on the title of the web study guide to access it.

6. Once purchased, a link to your product will permanently appear in the menu on the left. All you need to
do to access your web study guide on subsequent visits is sign in to
www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing and follow the link!

Click the Need Help? button on the book’s website if you need assistance along the way.

6

Guy Maxton Lewis, 1926-2013

Photo courtesy of Special Collections and Archives, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

We dedicate this book to the memory and legacy of Professor Guy M. Lewis, a true genius and visionary. Guy
was a key founder and builder of undergraduate and graduate programs in sport studies and sport
management at both the University of Massachusetts and the University of South Carolina. Throughout his
long and active career, he constantly searched for ways to integrate the theoretical with the practical, scholars
with practitioners. His professional contributions include the North American Society for Sport History, the
Sport Management Arts and Sciences Conferences at UMass, and the International Sports Business
Conferences at South Carolina. We happily consider ourselves among the many students, colleagues, and
professional associates who have benefitted from his wisdom and counsel. He will be missed. His
contributions will endure.

7

Contents
Contributors

Foreword

Preface
Web Study Guide
Instructor Resources

Acknowledgments

Chapter 1: The Special Nature of Sport Marketing
The NBA and Global Marketing Strategy
Weathering Recessions
The Competitive Marketplace
Sport Marketing Defined
Marketing Myopia in Sport
Change in the Profession
Uniqueness of Sport Marketing
Wrap-Up

Chapter 2: Strategic Marketing Management
Sport Strategy Is More Than Locker Room Talk
Marketing Planning Process
Strategic Step 1: Develop Vision, Position, and Purpose
Strategic Step 2: Develop Strategic Goals and Objectives
Strategic Step 3: Develop a Ticket Marketing, Sales, and Service Plan
Strategic Step 4: Integrate the Marketing Plan Into a Broader, Strategic Resource Allocation
Strategic Step 5: Control and Evaluate Implementation of the Plan
Eight-Point Ticket Marketing, Sales, and Service Plan Model
Wrap-Up

Chapter 3: Understanding the Sport Consumer
Socialization, Involvement, and Commitment
Environmental Factors
Individual Factors
Decision Making
Wrap-Up

Chapter 4: Market Research in the Sport Industry
Sources of Information
Users of Market Research in Sport and Entertainment
Application of Market Research in the Sport Industry
Performing the Right Research
Wrap-Up

Chapter 5: Market Segmentation
What Is Market Segmentation?
Four Bases of Segmentation
Integrated Segmentation Strategies and Tactics
Wrap-Up

8

Chapter 6: The Sport Product
What Is the Sport Product?
The Sport Product: Its Core and Extensions
Grassroots Ideas
Key Issues in Sport Product Strategy
Wrap-Up

Chapter 7: Managing Sport Brands
What Is Branding?
Importance of Brand Equity
Benefits of Brand Equity
How Brand Equity Is Developed
Wrap-Up

Chapter 8: Sales and Service
Relationship Between Media, Sponsors, and Fans and the Sales Process
What Is Sales?
Direct Data-Based Sport Marketing and Sales
Typical Sales Approaches Used in Sport
Pricing Basics
Secondary Ticket Market
Aftermarketing, Lifetime Value, and the Importance of Retaining Customers
Wrap-Up

Chapter 9: Sponsorship, Corporate Partnerships, and the Role of Activation
What Is Sponsorship?
Sponsorship in the Marketing Mix
Growth of Sponsorship
What Does Sport Sponsorship Have to Offer?
Corporate Objectives
Sponsor Activation
Selling Sponsorships
Ethical Issues in Sponsorship
Wrap-Up

Chapter 10: Promotion and Paid Media
The Catchall P: Promotion
Advertising
Advertising Media for Sport
Promotional Concepts and Practices
Promotional Components
Ultimate Goal: Keeping Consumers on the Escalator and Moving Them Up
Putting It All Together: An Integrated Promotional Model
Wrap-Up

Chapter 11: Public Relations
What Is Public Relations?
Public Relations in the Sport Marketing Mix
Sport Public Relations in the Digital Age
Public Relations Functions
Sport, Television, and Entertainment Influence on Sport Public Relations
Wrap-Up

Chapter 12: Social Media in Sport
What Is Social Media?

9

Building an Audience
Engaging Fans
Driving Behavior
Social Media Platforms
Avoiding Pitfalls
Leveraging Players and Talent
Wrap-Up

Chapter 13: Delivering and Distributing Core Products and Extensions
Placing Core Products and Their Extensions
Theory of Sport and Place
Facility
Marketing Channels
Product-Place Matrix
Wrap-Up

Chapter 14: Legal Aspects of Sport Marketing
Intellectual Property
Trademark Infringement
Copyright Law and Sport Marketing
Patents
Sport Marketing Communications Issues
Ambush Marketing
Right of Publicity and Invasion of Privacy
Contractual Issues Involving Consumers
Promotion Law Issues
Emerging Issues
Wrap-Up

Chapter 15: Putting It All Together
Cross-Effects Among the Five Ps
Controlling the Marketing Function
Wrap-Up

Chapter 16: The Shape of Things to Come
From Our Crystal Ball
From Our Crystal Ball Redux: By the Year 2020
Wrap-Up

About the Authors

10

Contributors
Leigh Buwen

Manager of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Kathy Connors

Principal and Founder

KMC Consulting, LLC

Kirsten Corio

Vice President, Team Marketing and Business Operations

NBA

Jaclyn Cranston

Senior Manager of Sales and Service

Turnkey Intelligence

Evelyn Dwyer

Manager of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Jay Gladden

Dean and Professor

School of Physical Education and Tourism Management

Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis

John Grady

Associate Professor

University of South Carolina

Haynes Hendrickson

11

President

Turnkey Intelligence

Steve McKelvey, JD

Associate Professor

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Nikolay Panchev

Vice President of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

Steve Seiferheld

Senior Vice President of Consumer Research

Turnkey Intelligence

12

Foreword
As my 30 years as NBA commissioner comes to an end, I can’t help but reminisce about just how far the sport
industry has come during this period. Perhaps nowhere is this growth more evident than in sport marketing.
It is hard to believe that just 30 years ago when the authors of Sport Marketing, Fourth Edition, wrote their
original manuscript, the term sport marketing was rarely used. Now, the term is common and regularly used
to encompass all of the activities in this book—activities that accurately depict the evolution of the sport
industry as I have experienced it during my tenure at the NBA. I have had the good fortune of working with
many of the most talented executives in the industry. As the industry has evolved, so have the leadership and
business capabilities of the teams. Now, most of our teams have more than 100 employees who sell tickets and
sponsorships; provide great customer service; develop marketing, advertising, and branding strategies; activate
platforms for marketing partners and sponsors to drive their businesses; produce TV and radio broadcasts
locally; service the media and place proactive messages; develop and produce the shows; and do meaningful
work in the community through innovative and socially responsible programs. This latest edition continues to
place those activities in a comprehensive framework, showing how the moving parts work together to develop
the sport business locally, nationally, and globally; and it refreshingly illustrates where the use of new
technologies now play their essential part. Particularly insightful are the data collection, aggregation, delivery,
and targeting technologies used in ticket marketing and sales and for increasing fan engagement using content
delivered predominantly via mobile devices.

The principal authors have a combination of academic and professional experience that is extraordinary. Their
education and experience as university professors provide them with unique perspectives. Their research and
analytical skills lead to objectivity and an ability to identify key industry needs. The theoretical framework
they have created into which every marketing strategy is set—the marketing planning process—leads to a
consistency in all branding, sales, and marketing strategies. Better yet, the authors have practical experience in
the field in senior executive capacities covering several segments of the sport industry, which has given them a
wealth of knowledge on best practices and the understanding of what actually works and what doesn’t.
Collectively, they have implemented just about all of the best practices firsthand for leagues, sport conferences,
and the most challenging of all situations, start-up teams and turnarounds.

I have observed the work of the authors for almost fifteen years as they contributed to the way NBA teams
conduct their business. Clearly the most significant contributions were the substantial increase in the sharing
of best practices and real data, increased adoption of direct marketing techniques, focus on the customer
“driveway to driveway” experience, and the basis of teams’ business strategies on the authors’ landmark work—
the attendance frequency escalator. As a result, most NBA teams today have much more sophisticated
database-building and customer relationship management (CRM) capabilities. The teams more effectively use
proactive outbound fan relationship management centers or telemarketing sales and intelligently targeted e-
marketing programs that are designed to increase trial, improve retention, and drive attendance. These
successful teams focus on the stepping-stone approach to fan development: Encourage more people
(particularly youth) to play the game, connect players and coaches more favorably with the community, get

13

more fans to watch or listen to broadcasts, progressively encourage fans to get off the couch or off the
computer or mobile device and sample the NBA game in person, and offer a full menu of full- and partial-
season ticket plans designed to move fans up the attendance frequency escalator. The greatest benefit of this
approach has been a significant increase in the lifetime value (LTV) of fans in the respective team markets,
and ultimately, the league itself.

Mixing in their unique intellect and personalities, the authors use their vast academic and practical experience
to make this book a must-read for future generations of sport marketers, managers, and perhaps even
commissioners in their “retirement.”

David J. Stern

Commissioner, National Basketball Association

14

Preface
There is only one way to describe the massive changes in the sport world since the first edition of Sport
Marketing came out in 1993: “Holy cow!” as the late Harry Caray always put it. In 1993 most people would
have thought that the Internet was a spy ring and that a web page was something in a newsletter of Ducks
Unlimited. When our second edition appeared in 2000, the Internet was old hat, but it was still the most
innovative medium of the age. File sharing was just beginning in 2000. And what of the concept of social
media? In 2000 Internet nerds would have thought that YouTube was a phrase deriding old media. Hardly.
By 2007 YouTube.com had become the hottest site on the Internet. More than a million video clips were
viewed each day, many of them sporting events. In 2014 we can add Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other
social media as both products and experiences that have transformed the way that consumers engage sport.
And just about everything has gone wireless, especially with the explosive growth of smartphones. Marketers
have adapted. Executives throughout the sport world get their industry news and data through online services
such as SportsBusinessDaily.com and SBRnet.com, and trade publications, such as Street & Smith’s
SportsBusiness Journal and Athletic Business, have online versions. But they all employ social media and wireless
technologies to gather and dispense information. We have incorporated many of the latest marketing ideas in
this edition, but new products and services are emerging daily.

Some things haven’t changed much. The competition for the sport and entertainment dollar is as heavy as
ever. Sport marketing is a competitive business involving as much front-office strategy, risk, discipline, and
energy as that shown by the players and coaches who figure so prominently in the public’s imagination. The
fourth edition of Sport Marketing offers abundant examples of the latest issues in the competitive marketplace.

As academics, we have been studying changes in the sport industry for over 40 years, long before Forbes and
Fortune began to take sport seriously with regular coverage. When we started out as graduate students in the
early 1970s, few scholars were willing to accept sport as a serious topic of study. Now leading academics in
marketing, management, law, and economics (to name only a few disciplines) are rushing headlong for book
contracts on sport. We have both followed and helped build this growing body of literature. More important,
each of us has also worked inside the industry, trying to make sense of the ways that fans, players, coaches, the
media, equipment companies, and others interact to make the game tick. We have planned, administered, or
consulted on literally thousands of events across just about every sport considered mainstream and at just
about every level. This book emanates from our own fusion of experience as academics and practitioners. We
have written a survey that we hope is as useful for the classroom student as it is for the athletics director of a
college or high school or the marketer of a professional franchise.

We have tried to balance theoretical models with case studies from the rinks, fields, courts, slopes, gyms,
tracks, and other venues that make up the sport marketplace. If theory is the skeleton that gives structure to
thinking, then case studies put meat on the bones. Although most of our examples are from the United States,
we have added considerable material from sports in other countries and cultures.

15

\INSERT bookstore e-book icon here\

Readers of past editions will find both continuity and change in this book. Chapters 1 through 3 provide an
overview of the sport market and sport marketing as an area of study and as a process. Chapters 4 (by Haynes
Hendrickson, Steve Seiferheld, Nikolay Panchev, Jaclyn Cranston, Leigh Buwen, and Evelyn Dwyer of
Turnkey) and 5 consider conceptual tools and steps of preliminary market research and market segmentation,
which are critical to overcoming a tendency to equate promotions with marketing. Chapters 6 through 13
explore the nuts and bolts of marketing plans—the five Ps of sport marketing: product, price, promotion,
place, and public relations. But these Ps are conceptually robust, so readers will note special chapters or
chapter sections on branding (Jay Gladden), sales and service, engagement and activation, community
relations (Kathy Connors), and social media (Kirsten Corio). The last three chapters offer some important
elements on legal issues (Steve McKelvey and John Grady), control, evaluation, and projecting the future. The
book is filled with sidebars written by other industry and academic leaders. We thank them all for their
contributions.

The world of sport marketing continues to challenge and excite us. We only hope that this edition is as
enjoyable to read as it was to write.

16

Web Study Guide

A new and exciting addition to the fourth edition is the web study guide (WSG), which gives students the
opportunity to listen to sport industry leaders talk about how they incorporate marketing strategies into their
daily work through exclusive video clips produced by David Perricone, who has experience as an academic and
practitioner. Activities are built around these video clips, asking students to do what these industry experts
already do: integrate core concepts and strategies from the textbook into applied situations.

Besides the video-based exercises, the web study guide has web search activities in which students will assess
and compare strategies that can be found on sport organization websites, YouTube, and other online
locations. These two activity types ensure that students will have even more opportunity to engage in the
material found in these pages. Throughout the book, students are directed to the web study guide with cross-
references like this:

Activity 1.2 The Global Marketing Strategy

College sport marketing has traditionally been centered in the United States. In this WSG
activity, you will learn how a globalized marketplace is changing college sports.

The web study guide is available at www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.

17

Instructor Resources

A full array of instructor resources are available:

Presentation package plus image bank: The presentation package includes more than 400 slides that
cover the key points from the text, including 30 select figures and tables. Instructors can easily add new
slides to the presentation package to suit their needs. The image bank includes all the figures and tables
from the book, separated by chapter. These items can be added to the presentation package, student
handouts, and so on.
Instructor guide: The instructor guide includes a sample syllabus and ideas for semester-long activities
and case studies. Individual chapter-by-chapter files include a chapter summary, chapter objectives,
chapter outline, and classroom ideas, which include the suggestion of case studies from the online
journal Case Studies in Sport Management.
Test package: The test package includes more than 200 questions in true–false, multiple-choice, fill-in-
the-blank, and short-answer formats. These questions are available in multiple formats for a variety of
instructor uses and can be used to create tests and quizzes to measure student understanding.
Chapter quizzes: New to the fourth edition are chapter quizzes. These LMS-compatible, ready-made
quizzes can be used to measure student learning of the most important concepts for each chapter. More
than 150 questions (8 to 10 questions per chapter) are included in true–false, multiple-choice, fill-in-
the-blank, and short-answer formats.

Instructors can access these ancillaries by visiting www.HumanKinetics.com/SportMarketing.

18

Acknowledgments
Our chapter notes acknowledge the sources that we have used. In addition, we offer special acknowledgments
to a number of people. The first is David Stern, one of the premier sport marketing minds in the world. We
thank David for giving two of us the opportunity to work in the NBA as well as for sharing his insights and
providing daily inspiration through his strategic marketing initiatives. We also recognize the contributions
and value of the late Bill Veeck, whose writings and innovations continually remind us of the importance of
the fans and sport consumer behavior. Likewise, we appreciate Mike Veeck because he has done the same and
has forced us to examine our own practices and approaches when we forget about the fans. On the academic
side, we are indebted to Philip Kotler for his numerous contributions to the field of marketing, which have
influenced our thinking in terms of sport marketing. We have dedicated this edition to Dr. Guy Lewis, who
has been instrumental in shaping the academic coursework and program content for many of the
undergraduate and graduate programs in sport management. Matt Levine of SourceUSA, one of the original
and leading sport marketing consultants who helped shape the study of sport consumer behavior, has also
continued to inspire our thinking. We acknowledge the many academics who contribute to Sport Marketing
Quarterly and are members of the Sport Marketing Association (SMA). The research of our academic
colleagues and their tireless preparation of the sport marketers of tomorrow provide constant inspiration and
motivation to us.

We also offer special thanks to our chapter and sidebar contributors: Melissa Rosenthal Brenner, Leigh
Buwen, Ward Bullard, William Carafello, Catherine Carlson, Leigh Castergine, Kathy Connors, Kirsten
Corio, Jaclyn Cranston, Lou DePaoli, Ari de Wilde, Evelyn Dwyer, Jay Gladden, John Grady, Shane
Harmon, Adam Haukap, Chris Heck, Haynes Hendrickson, Jeff Ianello, Dae Hee Kwak, Amber Lilyestrom,
Jordan Maleh, Amy Jo Martin, Steve McKelvey, Brian Norman, Nikolay Panchev, Dave Perricone, Sarah
Sceery, Jared Schoenfeld, Susan Schroeder, Steve Seiferheld, Chad Seifried, Dr. Alan Seymour, Peter
Stringer, Jennifer Tobias, and Eric Woolworth.

Many other people helped us obtain, organize, and develop materials for the book. Mia Ramer, Madison
Southerlin, and Ben Holmes at the Aspire Group did research work to update data on participation,
demographics, and other sidebar facts. University of South Florida graduate students Kristine Carcione, Kayla
Chesanek, Katie Hatch and Amanda Puccinell also contributed their expertise. Abe Madkour and the staff at
SportsBusiness Daily (now an essential resource for anyone trying to make sense of the sport industry) have
been ever gracious with their help and permissions. Abe also contributed his views on the future in our last
chapter. Others who have given constant support and inspiration include Dot Sheehan, Steve Metcalf, and
Marty Scarano of the University of New Hampshire and Roger Godin of the Minnesota Wild. Thanks also to
Kirstin Kay and Tanya Downey at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst for providing us with the picture
of Guy Lewis on the dedication page.

This book could not have been done without the help and dedication of our editors from Human Kinetics—
Myles Schrag and Amanda Ewing. They whipped us, encouraged us, and coddled us as the time and case

19

required. They are outstanding professionals.

In our capacities as sport administrators and consultants, we have worked with hundreds of dedicated
executives, marketers, coaches, salespersons, customer service professionals, public and community relations
personnel, and sports information directors who have inspired us with their energy, dedication, and passion.
As academics, we thank and salute our colleagues and students over the years at the University of
Washington, Robert Morris University, Ohio State University, the University of Massachusetts, the
University of New Hampshire, the University of Central Florida, and the University of South Florida. These
colleagues and students have challenged, stretched, reshaped, and indulged our thinking on all the topics in
this book. We hope that we can convey to our readers their wisdom, their enthusiasm, their wonder for
learning, and their passion for moving the field forward.

20

Chapter 1
The Special Nature of Sport Marketing

© Human Kinetics

21

Objectives
To understand the market forces that create the need for enlightened marketing strategies in the
sport industry
To understand marketing myopia and other obstacles to successful marketing strategy
To recognize the components of the sport product and the sport industry
To recognize the factors that demand a different approach to the marketing of sport

22

Linsanity and the Global Sport Marketplace

Sports Illustrated was clear in its assessment: “Nothing, anywhere, has ever resembled the ascendance of
Jeremy Shu-How Lin, a legend seemingly pulled from the imagination of a goose-fleshed David Stern,
if not Disney’s most hyperbolic global marketing exec.” And this was only five games into Linsanity or
Linmania or . . . Linmarketing. Overlooked out of Palo Alto High School, taunted with racial slurs
while playing at Harvard, undrafted and twice cast off by NBA teams, Lin made the most of his
February 2012 chance with the New York Knicks. He was an early Valentine gift for his team, for
Madison Square Garden, for the NBA, for the world of basketball, and for sports fans everywhere. Oh,
and don’t forget marketers. Nine games into the drama, Lin had led the Knicks to an 8-1 record as he
threw up all-star numbers by averaging 25 points, 9.2 assists, and 3.8 rebounds per game. Both Lin and
the Knicks cooled off a tad by the All-Star break at month’s end. By mid-March they had suffered a
losing streak that mirrored the earlier run of wins. The team changed coaches. And then Lin went down
with a season-ending injury, fueling an equally strong conversation with a long lineage in sport. Would
he last in the league, or would he flame out? In July 2012 the Houston Rockets ensured the story’s

extension when they signed free agent Lin to a three-year, $25.1 million deal.1

Time would tell whether Jeremy Lin endured in the NBA. But action on the court was only half the
story. Linsanity, regardless of how long or short the run, offered a miniseries on the world of sport
marketing in the early 21st century. Jeremy Lin was both a player and a product to be branded,
monetized, and distributed in a global system. He embodied key ingredients of the successful sport

brands of the era.2

Stickiness

Jeremy Lin and his performance held the public’s imagination because they contained all the elements
that Chip and Dan Heath claimed were crucial to the “stickiness” of any product or idea:

Simplicity—Basketball statistics are simple. Unlike the economy or the political landscape,
basketball did not require observers to unravel or parse complicated formulas or polls in
considering Lin’s performance.
Unexpectedness—Few basketball experts predicted that Lin would even play in the NBA, let alone
be a phenomenon.
Concreteness—No conceptual fuzziness was involved in watching a YouTube clip of Lin
highlights.
Credibility—This question would loom large over time, as it does with every player in every sport,
at every level. Jeremy Lin was the real deal in February 2012. Would he hold up?
Emotion—One look at the way Lin played or the way that fans responded in Madison Square
Garden revealed great depth of emotion.
Narrativity—Lin’s background, his struggle to succeed, and his triumph (however brief) were the

23

fodder for endless stories.

International Reach

As with David Beckham in world football and Alex Ovechkin in ice hockey, stories about Jeremy Lin
played up his following across continents, in this case to China. One mid-February report from China
noted that “The clearest sign that Jeremy Lin’s appeal has spanned the Pacific to mainland China may
lie not in the 1.4 million Chinese microblog [Twitter-like] messages mentioning him in recent days, but
in a rare failure to meet demand here in the heart of one of the world’s largest centers of pirated garment
manufacturing.” As one store clerk near Shanghai noted tellingly, “His jerseys have sold out, even
including the counterfeit ones.” A Chines

Marketing homework help

IHP 510 Module Eight Worksheet Guidelines and Rubric

Overview: For the Module Six worksheet task, you proposed marketing and communication strategies based on the target market and demographics for a
department, program, or service of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services—strategies that align to its mission, vision, goals, and objectives. For
this follow-up worksheet task, you will complete a basic budget for implementing the marketing strategies you proposed in that task.

Prompt: First, complete the worksheet by listing the target market/demographic, the department/program/service, and the marketing technique for the three
priorities you selected in the Module Six worksheet task. Next, address the following critical elements as outlined in the worksheet:

• Prioritization of Funds: Identify how you will allocate a portion of the funds for each priority.
• Costs: Identify the direct, indirect, hidden, and total costs in the proposed healthcare marketing budget.
• Discussion: Describe why you made the specific budgeting choices of prioritization and specific costs. Be sure to include sources to validate the proposed

costs.

Rubric
Note: Although you are not being asked to prioritize your marketing tactics for a specific budget in your final healthcare marketing plan, this is an important
exercise to complete as it is crucial to understand how healthcare organizations allocate funds for their marketing campaigns.

Guidelines for Submission: Do not alter the worksheet or submit the assignment in the form of an essay. For this and all worksheets, you are not required to
include a cover page. You are expected to provide in-text citations for your sources and a reference list at the end of the worksheet.

Critical Elements Proficient (100%) Needs Improvement (75%) Not Evident (0%) Value

Prioritization of Funds Identifies a portion of the funds
to be allocated for each priority

Does not identify a portion of
funds to be allocated for each
priority

25

Costs Identifies the direct, indirect,
hidden, and total costs in the
proposed healthcare marketing
budget

Does not identify the direct,
indirect, hidden, and total costs
in the proposed healthcare
marketing budget

25

Discussion Describes why budgeting choices
were made around prioritization
and specific costs

Describes why budgeting choices
were made around prioritization
and specific costs, but with gaps
in detail, clarity, or logic

Does not describe why
budgeting choices were made
around prioritization and specific
costs

50

Total 100%

  • IHP 510 Module Eight Worksheet Guidelines and Rubric
    • Rubric

Marketing homework help

THE JOURNAL

The Journal is a document whereby individuals use the course material to evaluate their own
experiences and observations in an organizational setting. I prefer the use of your own current
employment for the journals. It is not acceptable to use second- hand situations (e.g., spouse,
friend- of- a- friend). By the same token, events should not be excessively dated. The latter may
be open to negotiation.

The content of the journal entries must address the three criteria below.

Objective I: The paper must “describe” the situation or practice to which a concept will be
applied. Best are current as yet unresolved issues. Next best would be immediately recent events.
The rest of the paper will be dedicated to showing how violation of or adherence to the course
concepts created a particular experience or pattern of experiences. You will need to give a
narrative illustration of the event. Be sure to provide enough “hard facts” to give the reader a
picture. Be careful not to provide so much that you do not stay focused on your chosen topic, or
that one begins to get lost in the trees. But do not be so generic or ambiguous that one does not
feel familiar with the situation. “Sufficient data” typically means the use of people and specific
behaviors as illustration. Later sections will use the concept to analyze why the situation exists,
and possibly what went wrong.

Objective II: The paper must “explain” the situation or experience. I anticipate each class session
will provide two or more “key learnings.” These issues may be enlightened self-awareness, a
labeling of previous knowledge, a realization of the importance of a previous event, or something
completely new. You will identify the key learnings to be used for the journal. You should
reference the dates of the class; the discussion topics, exercises, or readings that you will be
utilizing; and the theoretical objectives of the topic. Advice here is to consider both class and
reading material.

You will apply the course to the selected incident. The objectives here are to demonstrate your
familiarity with the concepts in two ways. On the one hand you will show your learning through
your ability to present the concept, while showing your understanding of the concepts through
their application to the situation. The major emphasis here is on using the course material to
show why the situation occurred; how the material helps you understand how and why it
occurred, and how this reflection has enlightened your understanding of human resource
management. This objective is critical to your grade. Objective I above is the story/description
aspect of the paper, while this objective addresses the analysis aspect.

Objective III: In building on your prior analysis, the paper should extrapolate your learning
towards human resources improvement. Using your discussion up to this point, consider ways
you could embark on using the “key learnings” to better the situation and/or the organization.
You should also use this section to develop specific action plans to guide your improvement
strategy.

Marketing homework help

BRM211 Research Methods I Final Assessment Task brief & rubrics

Instructions

· This assignment consists of writing the core elements for a research project that you already started in the previous sessions.

· You must use the “Dissertation Proposal Form” template, placing your writings in section II. Research Question or Hypothesis.

· Save your document with the filename: FINAL_xxxxxxx (where xxxxxxx is your last name).

Task

Development of a
research question, hypothesis and objectives
:

You must write a complex research question, that covers all relevant aspects of the research idea (the research question cannot be a dual answer question). Two hypotheses must be defined according to the research idea and question.

I. Research Question

II. Hypotheses

III. Research objectives (max. 8 steps)

Formalities

· Wordcount: 200 min -500- max.

· Font: Arial 12 pt.

· Text alignment: Justified

Submission: 08th of May 2022, 23:59 CEST.


Weight: This task is 60% of your total grade for this subject.

It assesses the following learning outcome:

· Demonstrate thorough understanding of the terminology of academic research and writing, defining a feasible research question and tentative hypotheses of a research project.

RUBRICS

Written answers  

Excellent 90-100% 

Good 80-89% 

Fair 70-79% 

Marginal Fail 60-69% 

Fail <60% 

 

Knowledge &Understanding (40%) 

Student demonstrates thorough understanding of content.

 

Student demonstrates considerable understanding of content.  

 

Student demonstrates some understanding of content. 

 

Student demonstrates limited understanding of content.  

 

Student demonstrates no understanding of content.  

 

 

Application (40%) 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with a high degree of effectiveness, providing relevant contents that support points. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with considerable effectiveness, providing some relevant contents that make a good attempt at supporting points. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with some effectiveness, providing contents although some may lack relevance or provide limited support. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with limited effectiveness, few/ irrelevant contents provided. 

 

No application of possible knowledge or skills. No contents provided. 

 

 

Communication 

(20%) 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with a high degree of effectiveness.  

 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with considerable effectiveness.  

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with some effectiveness.  

 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with limited effectiveness.  

 

Lack of use of conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline.  

 

Marketing homework help

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 1 of 15

STUDENT

STUDENT – PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK

PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK

Task Number 2 of 3 Task Name Policies and Procedure
Manual

National unit/s code
CPCCBC5007B

National unit/s title Administer the Legal
Obligations of a Building or
Construction Contractor

National qualification code CPC50210 National qualification title Diploma of Building and
Construction (Building)

RMIT Program code C5256A RMIT Course code BUIL6238C

Section A – Assessment Information

Duration and/or due date:

Due at the end of week 12

Task Instructions

Type of Product (tick which applies)

☐ Project

☐ Report

✓ Portfolio

☐ Case study

Summary and Purpose of Assessment

This is the second of three (3) tasks to demonstrate that you can administer the legal obligations of a

building or construction contractor, including obligations as either party to a contract.

Assessment Instructions

You must identify and plan for meeting the legal obligations of a construction business by creating a folder of policies,
procedures and other tools.

What

This task follows on from Assessment Task 1.

You have now completed a comprehensive review of the legal administration requirements of a building and
construction business and of your specific company.

You must now use that information to document or collate all of the legal documentation and information required to
meet your company obligations, maintain human resource relations and manage the best interests of clients.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 2 of 15

STUDENT

You will create and collate a comprehensive folder of paperwork for the administration of legal obligations in the
building and construction industry.

Your folder is expected to be the source document on which to base all other decisions about policies, procedures,
records and reports across the business. Therefore, you should include, to address the listed criteria:

• Policies

• Procedures

• Sample contracts / work offers

• Workflow charts, tables, schedules, appendixes or other ways of expressing information

• Monitoring Tools

• Record templates

• Reporting templates

• Information about software, files or other technology to be used

• Copies of consultations, online enquiries and other communications for confirming approval of licensing and
registration and similar

You can use any source of information, including sample policies, procedures and templates you have been exposed to
in this and other classes, the internet, workplaces with which you are familiar and industry sources to inform your
folder.

• Where you collate information from these sources, you will need to include the source in a reference list

• Where you have decided to include a copy of information you must annotate that information to indicate the
adjustments that may need to be made, how it meets the business requirements and the process for maintaining
the information.

Your folder must:

• Have a table of contents

• Use page numbers, version control and footers consistent with legal documentation

• Be in a logical order that groups information together.

• Link policies, procedures and their related documentation, record keeping tools, reporting and other templates
together for easy use.

It is strongly suggested that the sections in your folder relate to and are in the order of the criteria in the Marking
Guide in Section B of this assessment. However, each section may be made up of many different documents.

IMPORTANT: You should consider this an opportunity to investigate best practice and the highest possible standards of
employee welfare, provision and security. You should include details and opportunities that you would want for
yourself irrespective of the cost at this point of time. For example, you may wish to include, in your important
insurances, redundancy insurance schemes. You might also like to look at welfare opportunities including employee
assistance programs.

You must use the criteria in the marking guide at Section B of this Assessment to prepare and check your work and
collate your folder prior to submission.

Where

You will be provided some class time to work on this assessment, however, it is expected that you will need to
complete the majority of the assignment outside of class.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 3 of 15

STUDENT

How

You will be assessed against the criteria listed in the marking guide in Section B of this task. You must attempt all the
tasks:

o Satisfactory (S) performance- able to complete all the tasks correctly

o Not Yet Satisfactory (NYS) performance – not able to complete all the tasks correctly

Students need to achieve satisfactory (S) results in all three (3) assessments to be deemed Competent (CA).

Conditions for assessment

• You must submit all assessment evidence as instructed. Your assessor will assess the documentation
you provide.

• You must complete the task within the maximum allowed duration.

• Please make arrangements with your assessor at least one week prior to the assessment due date if you
feel you require special allowance or allowable adjustment to this task

• Provide information to the student on how to submit their product including how to name the
file/folder

• You will have the opportunity to resubmit any product deemed unsatisfactory (one re-submit is allowed
per unit).

• You will be assessed as satisfactory or not satisfactory

• You can appeal the assessment decision according to the RMIT Assessment Processes.

Instructions on submitting your project/portfolio/report

This assessment must be completed then submitted online through CANVAS (unless otherwise instructed by the

teacher/assessor). This assessment must be an individual submission and student’s own work.

Equipment/resources students must supply: Equipment/resources to be provided by RMIT or the
workplace:

• Computer with word processing software and
internet access

A USB drive for transporting and storing files.

• Computers with relevant software and internet
access.

• Documentation that should normally be available
in either a building or construction office – see list
within the assessment.

• Relevant codes, standards and regulations

• Copies of appropriate awards and workplace
agreements

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 4 of 15

STUDENT

• Office equipment, including calculators,
photocopiers and telephone systems

A suitable work area appropriate to the process.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 5 of 15

STUDENT

Section B – Marking Guide
Below is a checklist for how this assessment task will be judged as satisfactory or not satisfactory.

Key Criteria that must be demonstrated

This assessment demonstrates the skills and knowledge to administer the legal obligations of a building or construction
contractor, including obligations as either party to a contract.

The student must collate a comprehensive plan, using policies, procedures and other tools, for meeting legal
obligations.

Students require access to a safe work environment for assessment in simulation.

Students will need access to the following resources:

• Documentation that should normally be available in either a building or construction office

• Relevant codes, standards and regulations

• Copies of appropriate awards and workplace agreements

• Office equipment, including calculators, photocopiers and telephone systems

• A suitable work area appropriate to the process.

Criteria for Assessment Satisfactory Comment

Y N

The student has submitted a comprehensive folder for the
legal administration of a building and construction business.

The folder, at a minimum, contains all related information
and tools for:

 Meeting company obligations
 Maintaining human resource relations
 Managing the best interests of clients.

The student has included all sources of information in a
reference list as an Appendix to their folder.

The student has annotated any policies, procedures, tools
and other information they include direct from a source. The
annotations include:

The adjustments that may need to be made

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 6 of 15

STUDENT

How the business requirements are addressed by the
inclusion

The process for maintaining the information as current

The folder is in a logical order that groups information
together.

The folder includes:

A table of contents

Page numbers

Version control

Footers consistent with legal documentation

The folder links policies, procedures and their related
documentation, record keeping tools, reporting and other
templates together for easy use.

The student has indicated where each of the criteria in this
checklist is addressed within the folder.

1
The student has identified the need to register the
business.

The types OR sources of business registration have been
identified

The information required for registration has been
obtained from:

Internal sources (provided)

External sources

The student has submitted, within their folder, all
relevant procedures for establishing and registering the
business.

The steps for registration have been identified in
accordance with owner/operator preferences and legal
requirements.

The student has identified all relevant fees related to
the registration applications.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 7 of 15

STUDENT

2
The student has identified the need for business
contractor licensing.

The types OR sources of business contractor licensing
have been identified.

The information required for licensing has been
obtained from:

Internal sources (provided)

External sources

The student has submitted, within their folder, all the
relevant application forms relating to building
registration from appropriate government authorities
i.e. Victorian Building Authority (VBA).

The types OR sources of subcontractor licencing have
been identified.

The student has document subcontractor licensing
requirements in:

Conditions on work and other contracts

Policies

Procedures for recruitment

Procedures for selection

3
The student has identified the responsibilities of
operating a construction business in accordance with
legislation.

The student has addressed each record keeping
responsibility with a range of tools including, at a
minimum:

A policy

A procedure

A tool

Note: A tool may include templates and checklists.

Where the student has created tools to address
responsibilities:

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 8 of 15

STUDENT

Each tool includes instructions for completion by a
range of people in the workplace.

Each tool indicates any relevant calculations to be
completed.

Each tool indicates any relevant measurements to be
taken.

4
The student has included policies OR procedures OR
tools for ensuring that both:

Legal documents

Records

Are:

Kept

Carefully maintained

The student has taken into consideration privacy law in
the storage maintenance of legal documents and
records.

The student has included (where appropriate):

Times

Dates

Storage locations

Access restrictions or requirements

Standards for completion such as spell checked,
accurate, using blue pen or similar.

5
The student has included at least two (2) sample
employment contracts. Each contract:

Indicates the award or other employment agreement
addressed by the contract

Indicates, using annotation, notes or comments where
and how each is determined or customised on a case-
by-case basis for new engagements.

Indicates, using annotation, notes or comments where
calculations are required. This includes:

The formulas for calculations

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 9 of 15

STUDENT

The information sources for calculations

Any references to, such as page numbers, headings,
schedules or sections, in the award

Addresses the principles of workplace agreements

Addresses the other legalities of workplace agreements

6
The student has included recruitment and selection
practices including at least one (1) of each of the
following:

Policy

Procedure

Tool

The policies, procedures and tools address either
together or individually:

Recruitment

Selection

Each policy, procedure and tool apply equal opportunity
principles including:

– race
– colour
– gender
– sexual orientation
– age
– physical or mental disability
– marital status
– family or carer’s responsibilities
– pregnancy
– religion
– political opinion
– national extraction

social origin

7
The student has included procedures for:

Employment termination

Employment redundancy

The student has explained for each:

The process

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 10 of 15

STUDENT

Considerations

Legalities.

The student has included relevant and related:

Policies for termination and redundancy

Tools for termination and redundancy implementation

The student has included policies and procedures that
apply to termination and redundancy processes.

The student should identify:

The information sources for determining exit pay

Where calculations are made, the student should
mention the formulas OR software functions to be used.

The combination of amounts or calculations required to
determine exit pay

The variations that can occur due to age, position,
training, state or similar.

8
The student has established a dispute resolution
policies, procedures and processes for staff to follow.

The process has been documented in a clear way.

The process is articulated in each other relevant area of
policies, procedures and tools through links or specific
additional instructions.

The student has included relevant and related tools for
implementation.

9
The student has included a drafted correspondence to
an OHS authority to determine the necessary approvals
or permits prior to work commencing.

The student has used the research from AT1 on
provisions and their research to include:

Policies related to:

OHS

Workers Compensation

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 11 of 15

STUDENT

Return to work

Rehabilitation

Noise Abatement

Working Hours

Procedures related to:

OHS

Workers Compensation

Return to work

Rehabilitation

Noise Abatement

Working Hours

Tools related to:

OHS

Workers Compensation

Return to work

Rehabilitation

Noise Abatement

Working Hours

Where the student has created tools:

Each tool includes instructions for completion by a
range of people in the workplace.

Each tool indicates any relevant calculations to be
completed.

Each tool indicates any relevant measurements to be
taken.

The student has explained in relation to the included
policies, procedures and tools and the OH&S legislation,
regulations and other provisions:

The rights of workers

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 12 of 15

STUDENT

The responsibilities of workers

10
The student has identified practices for:

Taxation

GST

Superannuation

The student has included the practices for taxation, GST
and superannuation in:

Policies

Procedures

Tools

The policies, procedures and tools ensure taxation,
superannuation and GST payments are in compliance
with Australian Taxation Office requirements including
the requirement for payments to be:

Recorded

Collected

Made

The student has included at least one (1) example of the
each of the following completed records using random
or other sourced data:

Business Tax Records

Employee Tax Records

GST Records

Superannuation Records

The student has shown all working on calculations.

Where the student has created tools to address
responsibilities:

Each tool includes instructions for completion by a
range of people in the workplace.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 13 of 15

STUDENT

Each tool indicates any relevant calculations to be
completed.

Each tool indicates any relevant measurements to be
taken.

11
The student has identified relevant insurances required
for legal administration of the business.

The student has identified at least two (2) alternative
and suitable insurance policies to provide appropriate
cover for each of the following:

Personnel

Property

Project works

Any other identified insurance needs

The student has identified the relevant insurance
policies that will provide cover for each of the following
categories.

Personnel

Property

Project works

12
The student has included fair trading practices including
at least one (1) of each of the following:

Policies

Procedures

Tools

The student has accurately identified the businesses
responsibilities for fair trading and embedded these
across all areas of legal administration.

The student has identified the best interests of clients
and embedded these in the policies, procedures and
tools.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 14 of 15

STUDENT

The student has included any sample terms, conditions
or other aspects of contracts that must be used to
promote best interests.

13
The student has identified procurement practices
including at least one (1) of each of the following:

Policy

Procedure

Tool

The procurement policies, procedures and tools ensure:

Renewable materials are used as a primary aim
wherever possible over non-renewable materials

Low energy materials are used in preference to high
energy materials, where practical

14
The student has included processes to ensure
compliance with environmental protection legislation
including at least one of each of the following:

Policy

Procedure

Tool

The student has identified relevant methods for:

Recording information and data

Reporting information and data

Reporting non-compliances

Responding to environmental emergencies.

[CPCCBC5007B_Assessment 2 – Portfolio (Student)] [ 2 of 3 ] [28/11/2019]
Student product assessment task © Content is subject to copyright, RMIT University
FINAL APPROVED – STUDENT PRODUCT ASSESSMENT TASK TEMPLATE – June 2019_Version 2.0
Page 15 of 15

STUDENT

Section C – Feedback to Student

Has the student successfully completed the task? Yes No

Feedback to student:

Assessor Name Date

Marketing homework help

Introduction

Air New Zealand has been the New Zealand national carrier since 1940 and boasts about 105 fleets now. Due to increased competition, Air New Zealand has integrated marketing engineering principles such as multimedia, social media, websites, social share, search engines, print media blogs, and mobile to promote its services.[footnoteRef:1] Industry and competitor environments are important in establishing a company’s position. Industry environment refers to factors such as the threat of new entrants, power of suppliers, the threat of substitutes, power of buyers, and intensity of rivalry, which establishes an organization’s competitive response and profit potential. Competitor analysis, on the other hand, studies and interprets competitors’ positions and reactions to establish competitors’ ability to respond to actions like price change. This analysis focuses on industry and competitor environments affecting Air New Zealand. [1: Ehambaranathan, Eswaranathan, Shagesheela Murugasu, and Kawtar Tani. “Marketing Engineering: The Evaluation of Integrated Marketing Communications towards the Growth of Air New Zealand.” International Journal of Innovative Science, Engineering & Technology 6, no. 5 (2019): 227-235.]

Strategic groups

Air New Zealand faces competition from other major airlines, including Qantas, Emirates, and Pacific Blue operating within the same region. As shown by the pie chart extracted from Vowles and Tierney, Qantas and Air New Zealand controls about 70% of the market share, closely followed by Emirates with 9% and Pacific Blue with 7%. The attempt to form a strategic alliance to cartelize the Trans-Tasman route in 2004, where the two airlines, Air New Zealand and Qantas Airways, wanted the intervention of regulators to limit entry into the market, failed.[footnoteRef:2] With Emirates and Pacific Blue being low-cost airlines, they posed grate threat to Air New Zeeland and Qantas because there was a possibility of great price-sensitive customer loss when the incumbent airlines increased the price. [2: Vowles and Tierney, Open Skies Policies, 344-354. ]

Figure 1: Market share in percentage (Haugh and Hazledine, 2010)

Industry Environment Analysis

Both PESTEL and Porter’s Five Forces analysis refer (Appendix) show that Air New Zealand has the potential to grow and develop in the transportation industry. The effects of new entrants into Australia-New Zealand, Emirates, and Pacific Blue have a great impact on the operations of incumbents (Air New Zealand and Qantas). As evidenced by the graph below, two industry factors influenced two visible growths in passage carriage between 1999 and 2004. The first industry factor is the liberalization of air space after the signing of the Single Aviation Market agreement in 1999. Such government policies open avenues for the increased threat of entrants into the market.[footnoteRef:3] Virgin Blue’s entry into Australia-New Zealand air space created another change in firm behavior, increasing passage carriage. Both Air New Zealand and Qantas Airways increased capacity on the route due to Virgin Blue entering the market. Due to the competition to limit new entrants, the incumbents increased operations. In a span of 15 months after Virgin Blue entered the market, the passage capacity across the route increased by more than 25%. These reactions show the ability of the incumbents to retaliate against the threat of entrants by utilizing available resources to create low-fare passage flights. The increased operation aimed at preventing Emirates from entering the market. Entry into the Trans-Tasman Markets by Pacific Blue and Emirates stimulated the market that had been stagnant as a result of Air New Zealand offering low-fare flights using Freedom Air, a carrier within a Carrier for Air New Zeeland. Entering the market by Emirates and Pacific Blue stimulated the market with a 49% increase in the number of passengers.[footnoteRef:4] The industry rivalry between the airlines stimulated the growth of the passage flights within the Trans-Tasman market forcing the two incumbent airlines to start flights to other destinations not formerly covered. [3: Haugh, David, and Tim Hazledine. “Oligopoly behaviour in the Trans‐Tasman air travel market: The case of kiwi international.” New Zealand Economic Papers 33, no. 1 (1999): 1-25.] [4: Haugh and Hazlwdine, The Case of Kiwi international, 15. ]

Figure 2: Passenger growth rate due to increased competition (Haugh and Hazledine, 2010)

Competitor analysis

Air New Zealand was aware of the threat posed by entry into the market by Pacific Blue and Emirates airlines. The action was taken by Air New Zealand in 1996 and 2002 upon realization of Kiwi International and Pacific Blue’s intentions to enter the market, respectively demonstrating awareness of the threat the entrants would cause in the market. In 1996, Air New Zealand and Qantas Airways collaborated and forced Kiwi International from the market within 15 months of entry. Air New Zealand had the adequate motivation to reduce the entrants’ impact on the market share. Air New Zealand 1996 introduced low-cost airlines (Freedom Air) to counter the entrance of Kiwi International.[footnoteRef:5] In 2002, the airline also had capabilities to increase the number of destination and low-cost airlines to counter the threat posed by Pacific Blue entrance. Air New Zealand survived the two occasions because they did not assume the impact the entrant would cause. Another reason Air New Zealand survived is that it offers differentiated products. Even competitors such as Emirates that have the capabilities and resources to compete have little impact on the market share controlled by Air New Zealand. Air New Zealand has adopted a “Pacific Feel” as the basis for brand differentiation that entails a lack of formality and friendliness, a New Zealand brand symbol.[footnoteRef:6] However, Emirates has had a strong marketing strategy accompanied by low-cost services to counter the incumbent effect of Air New Zealand, such as sponsorship of yachting campaigns. Air New Zealand has established an organizational culture with visible elements such as language and dress code, which speak to the Maori customers in New Zealand. Competitors lack the capabilities to react to such visible elements. [5: Haugh, David, and Tim Hazledine. “Oligopoly behaviour in the Trans‐Tasman air travel market: The case of kiwi international.” New Zealand Economic Papers 33, no. 1 (1999): 1-25.] [6: Sayers, Janet. “The recent re-branding of Air New Zealand: What does it say about a New Zealand ‘style of labor’?” ORGANIZATION, IDENTITY, LOCALITY III (2007): 52-60.]

Conclusion

Air New Zealand has adopted a competitive strategy to limit new entrants even with market liberalization. Cultural visible elements, pricing, resource capabilities, and integration of marketing principles have helped Air New Zealand grow amidst high competition.

Reference

Ehambaranathan, Eswaranathan, Shagesheela Murugasu, and Kawtar Tani. “Marketing Engineering: The Evaluation of Integrated Marketing Communications towards the Growth of Air New Zealand.” International Journal of Innovative Science, Engineering & Technology 6, no. 5 (2019): 227-235.

Haugh, David, and Tim Hazledine. “Oligopoly behaviour in the Trans‐Tasman air travel market: The case of kiwi international.” New Zealand Economic Papers 33, no. 1 (1999): 1-25.

Hazledine, Tim. “Pricing, competition and policy in Australasian air travel markets.” Journal of Transport Economics and Policy (JTEP) 44, no. 1 (2010): 37-58.

Sayers, Janet. “The recent re-branding of Air New Zealand: What does it say about a New Zealand ‘style of labor’?” ORGANIZATION, IDENTITY, LOCALITY III (2007): 52-60.

Vowles, Timothy M., and Sean Tierney. “The geographic impact of ‘open skies’ policies on Trans‐Tasman air passenger service.” Asia Pacific Viewpoint 48, no. 3 (2007): 344-354.

Appendix

Qantas Airways, Pacific Blue, and Emirates are the major strategic groups competing with Air New Zealand. Strategic groups are the relevant firms in the industry competing with Air New Zealand. These strategic groups form competitors as they offer the same services and target the same customers. It is evident that Air New Zealand reacts to the threat of entrance and observes the AMC framework of competitor analysis. A is awareness of competitor presence, M is the motivation to respond to competitor presence, and C is capabilities or resources to counter the presence of the competitor. This framework is evidenced in Air New Zealand’s reaction to Emirates, Kiwi International, and Pacific Blue’s entry into the market. Awareness resulted in the introduction of low-cost carriers, predatory pricing, and agitation for policy change to cartelize the Trans-Tasman route. The speed at which \Air New Zealand reacted to Kiwi International’s entry into the market pushed the firm out of the market within 13 months.

Industry Environment analysis

A general environment refers to the various factors that affect an organization’s scope of operation and performance, which is beyond its control. Such factors create opportunities as well as drawbacks for a firm. Tapping opportunities can be realized through creating strong strategies. Factors in the general environment affect what happens in the industry environment. On the other hand, the industry environment refers to the scope set by a group of firms producing the same products for similar customers using similar resources. Doing a PESTEL analysis for Air New Zealand can help understand the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental & Legal (PESTEL) factors that affect the organization to develop realistic strategies to react and adapt to the general environment.

PESTEL Analysis

The availability of strong political structures promotes the growth and development of Air New Zealand. A stable government, in conjunction with good trade relations of New Zealand with other countries, creates a good environment for growth and attracts investors who can help the organization through the availability of numerous resources. Desirable tax policies support organization growth and development since they can easily expand into the international market. Competition regulation ensures a fair industry while protecting local growth. Air New Zealand can take advantage of the trade blocks and treaties signed by its country of origin with other countries regarding borders to expand its market share.

Economic

Economic factors: inflation rate, interest rate, consumer spending, and unemployment trends can affect business growth. A moderate inflation rate is favorable for Air New Zealand, promoting consumer confidence and spending trends. Low and moderate interest rates encourage taking loans; consequently, high consumer purchasing power and consumption rates create penetration opportunities for firms like Air New Zealand.

Social

Social factors in the general environment include demographics, education, family size, structure, and health consciousness. A high youth population and moderate to high middle-class population is essential for business growth as it helps create a large customer base. These groups help Air New Zealand to have brand ambassadors and promote consumer loyalty. Availability of high education is key as Air New Zealand can readily get skilled and talented personnel, knowledgeable consumers who have brand awareness and stand for quality. Family size helps understand consumer patterns, whereas heath consciousness has recently been a very important factor. Many people have shifted their focus to decisions that promote their wellness. Hence, Air New Zealand can take advantage of this, incorporate health aspects in their products, and take Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives.

Technological

Air New Zealand’s country of origin has a strong technological infrastructure that influences the organization to embrace technology in its operations for efficiency and affectivity purposes. Additionally, technological infrastructure attracts direct and foreign investment, giving Air New Zealand a competitive advantage. Air New Zealand enjoys a competitive advantage through high internet penetration amongst the population. It can reach consumers widely via the internet and use social media for connectivity and gathering feedback and consumer data. Lastly, investing in research and development helps the industry gain new insights into doing business.

Environmental

Environmental factors include sustainability and recycling to protect the planet. Therefore, an organization’s decision regarding its operation concerning the environment affects its success in the market globally. Consumers nowadays are aware of recycling products rather than disposing them off. Air New Zealand has established recycling sites at the centers where its products are disposed. Moreover, as per the country’s regulations on waste management and control, the organization has launched a process for managing its waste in an environment-friendly way. Air New Zealand embraces the green lifestyle by engaging in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities. Air New Zealand also embraces the country’s renewable energy investments by using solar energy and hydro poles in its business operations.

Legal

Air New Zealand considers health and safety laws and considers the safety and health of its employees. In addition, it considers employment and anti-discrimination laws due to the presence of a diverse population domestically and internationally.

Porters’ Five Forces Analysis

The threat of new entrants

Air New Zealand faces the threat of having new entrants venturing into the transportation industry, bringing new innovative ways of doing business, which would pressure the organization to lower its prices, reduce costs, and provide new customer value propositions. Air New Zealand must overcome this challenge to remain a top competitor. Air New Zealand should innovate its products and services. Additionally, the organization should build its economy of scale, allowing it to raise and lower its prices appropriately without affecting its profitability.

Bargaining Power of Suppliers

Powerful suppliers in the transportation industry can exploit firms in the industry. Higher supplier bargaining power means low profits for the organizations in operation. Air New Zealand should build an efficient supply chain by incorporating multiple suppliers to curb such a force.

Bargaining power of buyers

Buyers affect the firm’s profitability in the end because they want to buy the best offerings in the market at low prices. Having a smaller powerful customer base gives them higher bargaining power and low profits for the firm. Air New Zealand should keep coming up with new products to reach a wide base of customers and lower their bargaining power while ensuring their loyalty.

Threats of Substitute Products or Services

Availability of new products or services that satisfies similar customer needs in diverse ways reduces industry profitability. Air New Zealand, therefore should strive to understand its customers’ needs as well as the services they need

Rivalry among the existing competitors

Intense rivalry in an industry reduces prices lowering the profitability in the end. The transportation industry where Air New Zealand operates is very competitive, affecting overall profitability in the end. To tackle this, Air New Zealand should build a sustainable product and service differentiation, scale its economy to compete better, and collaborate with competitors to increase market size.

Marketing homework help

Final Task – Consumer behavior strategic recommendations

Please beware that the quantity and quality of references are of the utmost relevance towards the credibility of your work, make sure you include in-text citations alongside an appropriate list of references.

You must submit an individual report in which, after careful consideration and reviewing the specific topic, you provide strategic recommendations to the company selected in the midterm, based on consumer behavior theories and analysis. The expected sections and table of contents of this report are:

· Introduction: Purpose of the project and key consumer behavior insights (no more than 300 words)

· Current trends and consumer behavior ethics: What are trends related to consumer behavior within the industry as of 2022? What are some ethical

debates that concern customers today?

· Psychology of consumers: Address and explain the psychological factors that affect the behavior of the target audience (motivation, perception,

attitudes).

· Customer’s journey: Acknowledge and apply the (1) consumer decision-making process regarding this brand, and (2) the customer journey map (applied

to this company to). The latter should be developed as seen in class, using the visual representation of the framework. Make sure to identify strong and

weak points within the consumers’ journey.

· Strategic recommendations: Considering the report that you have developed, and the information analyzed, recommend two strategies for the

company to implement concerning consumer behavior. Make sure that they are specific, the company should know exactly what to do and how to do it; avoid using general statements or simply pointing out to strategies. Rather, fully develop them including all pertinent details and explaining why the company should do these two actions.

Formalities:

· Wordcount: minimum of 2000 and maximum of 2500 words.

· Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

· Font: Arial 11, 1.5 line spacing.

· The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Marketing homework help

716

Course structure

Business

models

Identifying

Problem

Analysing

customers

Analysing

context

Analysing

distribution

Analysing

resources

Strategy

develop

ment

Strategy

evaluation

Implement

ation

Today

Learning objectives

1.

Importance of problem statement

2.

Clarify that need to consider multiple strategic

alternatives

3.

Detail a sequence for strategy development and

evaluation

4.

Outline some common strategic errors

3

Agenda

How to identify a strategic problem

Multiple alternatives

Strategy development sequence

Strategy errors of logic

An overview of the strategy process

Environment

Problem

Strategy

Implementation

What is common in these companies?

Problem identification is ‘must’ for strategy

Strategies that would not solve this problem:

Have a cup of coffee

Take a picture

…….

Problems are not always visible

8

“Well

defined problems lead to

breakthrough solutions.”

Centrality of the ‘problem’

The problem identification

a pivoting opportunity

Problem

Strategy Development: A sequence

Strategy

formulation

Strategy

evaluation

Strategy

implementation

Performance

evaluation

Problem

definition


Choice

A

B

C

Strategy as a solution to a problem

“Problem” may simply be a limitation or blockage

to taking advantage of an opportunity

Strategy is

more than a

set of tools,

methods and

plans

One problem

alternative solutions

Problem effect

Problem 1

Solution 1

Problem 2

Solution 2

Problem 3

Solution 3

Problem 4

Solution 4

Does not work for an SME

Does not have enough

resources to

simultaneously solve so

many problems

No creativity in alternatives

Problem 1

Alternative 1

Alternative 2

Alternative 3

Address the problem that

causes most problem

Creative alternatives to

address problem rather

than most obvious

Creating strategy alternatives

You need to evaluate multiple alternative strategies

before deciding on the best approach

always more than one solution to a strategy problem

different logics and perspectives; critical thinking

Porter’s ‘Generic’ Competitive Strategies

Growth strategies: Ansoff matrix

Standard strategy 1: Growth

Growth – to increase market share or more markets or more products or gain economies of scale or all of them.

Types are:

· Concentration: Three segments of Ansoff matrix – market exploitation, product development, market development.

· Integration: horizonal or vertical (in industry value chain)

·
Diversification
: (i) Concentric (related) or (b) Conglomerate (unrelated)

Standard strategy 2: Stability

Maintain

current operations, market size and

position

many small businesses are comfortable with this

risk

averse strategy

Types are:

No change strategies

Pause & proceed with caution

Profit

strategies

Standard strategy 3: Retrenchment

Challenging times

and need to cut costs,

streamline operations, reduce in size or close

business

Types

are:

Turnaround

Divestment

Bankruptcy

Liquidation

Digital

marketing strategy

Growth & development

of

a brand

in the

digital

universe

by

using online marketing channels

More

than devise used (mobile or desktop) or to

the brand’s property (website)

Covers every

social platform, app, web directory (or

other) that represents a point of

contact

Uses

POEM (Paid Owned Earned Media)

POEM: Paid

Owned

Earned Media

Digital

strategy

many options

Importance

of

strategy evaluation

Summary: Sequence

Strategy

formulation

Strategy

evaluation

Strategy

implementation

Performance

evaluation

Problem

definition


Choice

A

B

C

What is the reasons for their failure?

1) Helps in addressing a problem or a challenge

2) Helps in taping into or taking advantage of an opportunity

A strategy

can do:

one or two

or both

3) both

Marketing homework help

BRM211 Research Methods I Final Assessment Task brief & rubrics

Instructions

· This assignment consists of writing the core elements for a research project that you already started in the previous sessions.

· You must use the “Dissertation Proposal Form” template, placing your writings in section II. Research Question or Hypothesis.

· Save your document with the filename: FINAL_xxxxxxx (where xxxxxxx is your last name).

Task

Development of a
research question, hypothesis and objectives
:

You must write a complex research question, that covers all relevant aspects of the research idea (the research question cannot be a dual answer question). Two hypotheses must be defined according to the research idea and question.

I. Research Question

II. Hypotheses

III. Research objectives (max. 8 steps)

Formalities

· Wordcount: 200 min -500- max.

· Font: Arial 12 pt.

· Text alignment: Justified

Submission: 08th of May 2022, 23:59 CEST.


Weight: This task is 60% of your total grade for this subject.

It assesses the following learning outcome:

· Demonstrate thorough understanding of the terminology of academic research and writing, defining a feasible research question and tentative hypotheses of a research project.

RUBRICS

Written answers  

Excellent 90-100% 

Good 80-89% 

Fair 70-79% 

Marginal Fail 60-69% 

Fail <60% 

 

Knowledge &Understanding (40%) 

Student demonstrates thorough understanding of content.

 

Student demonstrates considerable understanding of content.  

 

Student demonstrates some understanding of content. 

 

Student demonstrates limited understanding of content.  

 

Student demonstrates no understanding of content.  

 

 

Application (40%) 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with a high degree of effectiveness, providing relevant contents that support points. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with considerable effectiveness, providing some relevant contents that make a good attempt at supporting points. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with some effectiveness, providing contents although some may lack relevance or provide limited support. 

Applies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with limited effectiveness, few/ irrelevant contents provided. 

 

No application of possible knowledge or skills. No contents provided. 

 

 

Communication 

(20%) 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with a high degree of effectiveness.  

 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with considerable effectiveness.  

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with some effectiveness.  

 

Uses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with limited effectiveness.  

 

Lack of use of conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline.  

 

Marketing homework help

PA RT S I X

T H E C O U N T RY N O T E B O O K O U T L I N E

Cultural Analysis

Economic Analysis

Market Audit and Competitive Market Analysis

Preliminary Marketing Plan

Country Notebook
THE COUNTRY NOTEBOOK—A GUIDE FOR
DEVELOPING A MARKETING PLAN

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 579cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 579 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

580 Part 6 Supplementary Material

The fi rst stage in the planning process is a preliminary country
analysis. The marketer needs basic information to evaluate a coun-
try market’s potential, identify problems that would eliminate a
country from further consideration, identify aspects of the coun-
try’s environment that need further study, evaluate the components
of the marketing mix for possible adaptation, and develop a stra-
tegic marketing plan. One further use of the information collected
in the preliminary analysis is as a basis for a country notebook.
Many companies, large and small, have a country notebook
for each country in which they do business. The country notebook
contains information a marketer should be aware of when making
decisions involving a specifi c country market. As new informa-
tion is collected, the country notebook is continually updated by
the country or product manager. Whenever a marketing decision
is made involving a country, the country notebook is the fi rst data-
base consulted. New-product introductions, changes in advertising
programs, and other marketing program decisions begin with the
country notebook. It also serves as a quick introduction for new
personnel assuming responsibility for a country market.
This section presents four separate guidelines for collection
and analysis of market data and preparation of a country notebook:
(1) guideline for cultural analysis, (2) guideline for economic
analysis, (3) guideline for market audit and competitive analysis,
and (4) guideline for preliminary marketing plan. These guidelines
suggest the kinds of information a marketer can gather to enhance
planning.
The points in each of the guidelines are general. They are de-
signed to provide direction to areas to explore for relevant data.

In each guideline, specifi c points must be adapted to refl ect a
company’s products and/or services. The decision as to the appro-
priateness of specifi c data and the depth of coverage depends on
company objectives, product characteristics, and the country mar-
ket. Some points in the guidelines are unimportant for some coun-
tries or some products and should be ignored. Preceding chapters
of this book provide specifi c content suggestions for the topics in
each guideline.

I. CULTURAL ANALYSIS
The data suggested in the cultural analysis include information
that helps the marketer make market planning decisions. However,
its application extends beyond product and market analysis to
being an important source of information for someone interested
in understanding business customs and other important cultural
features of the country.
The information in this analysis must be more than a collection
of facts. Whoever is responsible for the preparation of this mate-
rial should attempt to interpret the meaning of cultural information.
That is, how does the information help in understanding the effect
on the market? For example, the fact that almost all the popula-
tions of Italy and Mexico are Catholic is an interesting statistic but
not nearly as useful as understanding the effect of Catholicism on
values, beliefs, and other aspects of market behavior. Furthermore,
even though both countries are predominantly Catholic, the infl u-
ence of their individual and unique interpretation and practice of
Catholicism can result in important differences in market behavior.

I. Introduction
Include short profi les of the company, the product to be exported, and the
country with which you wish to trade.

II. Brief discussion of the country’s relevant history
III. Geographical setting

A. Location
B. Climate
C. Topography

IV. Social institutions
A. Family

1. The nuclear family
2. The extended family
3. Dynamics of the family

a. Parental roles
b. Marriage and courtship

4. Female/male roles (changing or static?)
B. Education

1. The role of education in society
a. Primary education (quality, levels of development, etc.)
b. Secondary education (quality, levels of development, etc.)
c. Higher education (quality, levels of development, etc.)

2. Literacy rates
C. Political system

1. Political structure
2. Political parties
3. Stability of government
4. Special taxes
5. Role of local government

Guideline

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 580cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 580 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

Country Notebook A Guide For Developing A Marketing Plan 581

D. Legal system
1. Organization of the judiciary system
2. Code, common, socialist, or Islamic-law country?
3. Participation in patents, trademarks, and other conventions

E. Social organizations
1. Group behavior
2. Social classes
3. Clubs, other organizations
4. Race, ethnicity, and subcultures

F. Business customs and practices
V. Religion and aesthetics

A. Religion and other belief systems
1. Orthodox doctrines and structures
2. Relationship with the people
3. Which religions are prominent?
4. Membership of each religion
5. Any powerful or infl uential cults?

B. Aesthetics
1. Visual arts (fi ne arts, plastics, graphics, public art, colors, etc.)
2. Music
3. Drama, ballet, and other performing arts
4. Folklore and relevant symbols

VI. Living conditions
A. Diet and nutrition

1. Meat and vegetable consumption rates
2. Typical meals
3. Malnutrition rates
4. Foods available

B. Housing
1. Types of housing available
2. Do most people own or rent?
3. Do most people live in one-family dwellings or with other families?

C. Clothing
1. National dress
2. Types of clothing worn at work

D. Recreation, sports, and other leisure activities
1. Types available and in demand
2. Percentage of income spent on such activities

E. Social security
F. Healthcare

VII. Language
A. Offi cial language(s)
B. Spoken versus written language(s)
C. Dialects

VIII. Executive summary
After completing all of the other sections, prepare a two-page (maximum length)
summary of the major points and place it at the front of the report. The purpose
of an executive summary is to give the reader a brief glance at the critical points
of your report. Those aspects of the culture a reader should know to do business
in the country but would not be expected to know or would fi nd different based
on his or her SRC should be included in this summary.

IX. Sources of information
X. Appendixes

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 581cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 581 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

582 Part 6 Supplementary Material

II. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
The reader may fi nd the data collected for the economic analysis
guideline are more straightforward than for the cultural analysis
guideline. There are two broad categories of information in this

guideline: general economic data that serve as a basis for an evalu-
ation of the economic soundness of a country, and information
on channels of distribution and media availability. As mentioned
previously, the guideline focuses only on broad categories of data
and must be adapted to particular company and product needs.

I. Introduction
II. Population

A. Total
1. Growth rates
2. Number of live births
3. Birthrates

B. Distribution of population
1. Age
2. Sex
3. Geographic areas (urban, suburban, and rural density and concentration)
4. Migration rates and patterns
5. Ethnic groups

III. Economic statistics and activity
A. Gross national product (GNP or GDP)

1. Total
2. Rate of growth (real GNP or GDP)

B. Personal income per capita
C. Average family income
D. Distribution of wealth

1. Income classes
2. Proportion of the population in each class
3. Is the distribution distorted?

E. Minerals and resources
F. Surface transportation

1. Modes
2. Availability
3. Usage rates
4. Ports

G. Communication systems
1. Types
2. Availability
3. Usage rates

H. Working conditions
1. Employer–employee relations
2. Employee participation
3. Salaries and benefi ts

I. Principal industries
1. What proportion of the GNP does each industry contribute?
2. Ratio of private to publicly owned industries

J. Foreign investment
1. Opportunities?
2. Which industries?

K. International trade statistics
1. Major exports

a. Dollar value
b. Trends

2. Major imports
a. Dollar value
b. Trends

Guideline

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 582cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 582 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

Country Notebook A Guide For Developing A Marketing Plan 583

3. Balance-of-payments situation
a. Surplus or defi cit?
b. Recent trends

4. Exchange rates
a. Single or multiple exchange rates?
b. Current rate of exchange
c. Trends

L. Trade restrictions
1. Embargoes
2. Quotas
3. Import taxes
4. Tariffs
5. Licensing
6. Customs duties

M. Extent of economic activity not included in cash income activities
1. Countertrades

a. Products generally offered for countertrading
b. Types of countertrades requested (barter, counterpurchase, etc.)

2. Foreign aid received
N. Labor force

1. Size
2. Unemployment rates

O. Infl ation rates
IV. Developments in science and technology

A. Current technology available (computers, machinery, tools, etc.)
B. Percentage of GNP invested in research and development
C. Technological skills of the labor force and general population

V. Channels of distribution (macro analysis)
This section reports data on all channel middlemen available within the market.
Later, you will select a specifi c channel as part of your distribution strategy.
A. Retailers

1. Number of retailers
2. Typical size of retail outlets
3. Customary markup for various classes of goods
4. Methods of operation (cash/credit)
5. Scale of operation (large/small)
6. Role of chain stores, department stores, and specialty shops

B. Wholesale middlemen
1. Number and size
2. Customary markup for various classes of goods
3. Method of operation (cash/credit)

C. Import/export agents
D. Warehousing
E. Penetration of urban and rural markets

VI. Media
This section reports data on all media available within the country or market.
Later, you will select specifi c media as part of the promotional mix and strategy.
A. Availability of media
B. Costs

1. Television
2. Radio
3. Print
4. Internet
5. Other media (cinema, outdoor, etc.)

C. Agency assistance

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 583cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 583 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

584 Part 6 Supplementary Material

D. Coverage of various media
E. Percentage of population reached by each medium

VII. Executive summary
After completing the research for this report, prepare a two-page (maximum)
summary of the major economic points and place it at the front

VIII. Sources of information
IX. Appendixes

III. MARKET AUDIT AND
COMPETITIVE MARKET ANALYSIS
Of the guidelines presented, this is the most product or brand spe-
cifi c. Information in the other guidelines is general in nature, fo-
cusing on product categories, whereas data in this guideline are
brand specifi c and are used to determine competitive market con-
ditions and market potential.
Two different components of the planning process are refl ected
in this guideline. Information in Parts I and II, Cultural Analysis
and Economic Analysis, serve as the basis for an evaluation of the

product or brand in a specifi c country market. Information in this
guideline provides an estimate of market potential and an evaluation
of the strengths and weaknesses of competitive marketing efforts.
The data generated in this step are used to determine the extent of
adaptation of the company’s marketing mix necessary for successful
market entry and to develop the fi nal step, the action plan.
The detailed information needed to complete this guideline is
not necessarily available without conducting a thorough market-
ing research investigation. Thus another purpose of this part of the
country notebook is to identify the correct questions to ask in a
formal market study.

I. Introduction
II. The product

A. Evaluate the product as an innovation as it is perceived by the intended
market
1. Relative advantage
2. Compatibility
3. Complexity
4. Trialability
5. Observability

B. Major problems and resistances to product acceptance based on the
preceding evaluation

III. The market
A. Describe the market(s) in which the product is to be sold

1. Geographical region(s)
2. Forms of transportation and communication available in that (those)

region(s)
3. Consumer buying habits

a. Product-use patterns
b. Product feature preferences
c. Shopping habits

4. Distribution of the product
a. Typical retail outlets
b. Product sales by other middlemen

5. Advertising and promotion
a. Advertising media usually used to reach your target market(s)
b. Sales promotions customarily used (sampling, coupons, etc.)

6. Pricing strategy
a. Customary markups
b. Types of discounts available

B. Compare and contrast your product and the competition’s product(s)
1. Competitors’ product(s)

a. Brand name
b. Features
c. Package

2. Competitors’ prices

Guideline

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 584cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 584 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

Country Notebook A Guide For Developing A Marketing Plan 585

3. Competitors’ promotion and advertising methods
4. Competitors’ distribution channels

C. Market size
1. Estimated industry sales for the planning year
2. Estimated sales for your company for the planning year

D. Government participation in the marketplace
1. Agencies that can help you
2. Regulations you must follow

IV. Executive summary
Based on your analysis of the market, briefl y summarize (two-page maximum)
the major problems and opportunities requiring attention in your marketing mix,
and place the summary at the front of the report.

V. Sources of information
VI. Appendixes

IV. PRELIMINARY MARKETING PLAN
Information gathered in Guidelines I through III serves as the
basis for developing a marketing plan for your product or brand
in a target market. How the problems and opportunities that sur-
faced in the preceding steps are overcome or exploited to produce

maximum sales and profi ts are presented here. The action plan re-
fl ects, in your judgment, the most effective means of marketing
your product in a country market. Budgets, expected profi ts and
losses, and additional resources necessary to implement the pro-
posed plan are also presented.

I. The marketing plan
A. Marketing objectives

1. Target market(s) (specifi c description of the market)
2. Sales forecast years 1-5
3. Profi t forecast years 1-5
4. Market penetration and coverage

B. SWOT Analysis
1. Strengths
2. Weaknesses
3. Opportunities
4. Threats

C. Product adaptation or modifi cation—Using the product component model as
your guide, indicate how your product can be adapted for the market.
1. Core component
2. Packaging component
3. Support services component

D. Promotion mix
1. Advertising

a. Objectives
b. Media mix
c. Message
d. Costs

2. Sales promotions
a. Objectives
b. Coupons
c. Premiums
d. Costs

3. Personal selling
4. Other promotional methods

E. Distribution: From origin to destination
1. Port selection

a. Origin port
b. Destination port

Guideline

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 585cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 585 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

586 Part 6 Supplementary Material

2. Mode selection: Advantages/disadvantages of each mode
a. Railroads
b. Air carriers
c. Ocean carriers
d. Motor carriers

3. Packing
a. Marking and labeling regulations
b. Containerization
c. Costs

4. Documentation required
a. Bill of lading
b. Dock receipt
c. Air bill
d. Commercial invoice
e. Pro forma invoice
f. Shipper’s export declaration
g. Statement of origin
h. Special documentation

5. Insurance claims
6. Freight forwarder. If your company does not have a transportation or

traffi c management department, then consider using a freight forwarder.
There are distinct advantages and disadvantages to hiring one.

F. Channels of distribution (micro analysis). This section presents details about
the specifi c types of distribution in your marketing plan.
1. Retailers

a. Type and number of retail stores
b. Retail markups for products in each type of retail store
c. Methods of operation for each type (cash/credit)
d. Scale of operation for each type (small/large)

2. Wholesale middlemen
a. Type and number of wholesale middlemen
b. Markup for class of products by each type
c. Methods of operation for each type (cash/credit)
d. Scale of operation (small/large)

3. Import/export agents
4. Warehousing

a. Type
b. Location

G. Price determination
1. Cost of the shipment of goods
2. Transportation costs
3. Handling expenses

a. Pier charges
b. Wharfage fees
c. Loading and unloading charges

4. Insurance costs
5. Customs duties
6. Import taxes and value-added tax
7. Wholesale and retail markups and discounts
8. Company’s gross margins
9. Retail price

H. Terms of sale
1. EX works, FOB, FAS, C&F, CIF
2. Advantages/disadvantages of each

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 586cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 586 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

Country Notebook A Guide For Developing A Marketing Plan 587

I. Methods of payment
1. Cash in advance
2. Open accounts
3. Consignment sales
4. Sight, time, or date drafts
5. Letters of credit

II. Pro forma fi nancial statements and budgets
A. Marketing budget

1. Selling expense
2. Advertising/promotion expense
3. Distribution expense
4. Product cost
5. Other costs

B. Pro forma annual profi t and loss statement (fi rst year through fi fth year)
III. Resource requirements

A. Finances
B. Personnel
C. Production capacity

IV. Executive summary
After completing the research for this report, prepare a two-page (maximum)
summary of the major points of your successful marketing plan, and place it at
the front of the report.

V. Sources of information
VI. Appendixes

The intricacies of international operations and the complexity of the
environment within which the international marketer must operate create an
extraordinary demand for information. When operating in foreign markets,
the need for thorough information as a substitute for uninformed opinion is
equally important as it is in domestic marketing. Sources of information needed
to develop the country notebook and answer other marketing questions are
discussed in Chapter 8 and its appendix.

Summary

Market-oriented fi rms build strategic market plans around com-
pany objectives, markets, and the competitive environment. Plan-
ning for marketing can be complicated even for one country, but
when a company is doing business internationally, the problems
are multiplied. Company objectives may vary from market to mar-
ket and from time to time; the structure of international markets

also changes periodically and from country to country; and the
competitive, governmental, and economic parameters affecting
market planning are in a constant state of fl ux. These variations
require international marketing executives to be especially fl exible
and creative in their approach to strategic marketing planning.

cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 587cat2994X_cn_579-588.indd 587 18/08/10 12:28 PM18/08/10 12:28 PM

Marketing homework help

Final Task – Consumer behavior strategic recommendations

Please beware that the quantity and quality of references are of the utmost relevance towards the credibility of your work, make sure you include in-text citations alongside an appropriate list of references.

You must submit an individual report in which, after careful consideration and reviewing the specific topic, you provide strategic recommendations to the company selected in the midterm, based on consumer behavior theories and analysis. The expected sections and table of contents of this report are:

· Introduction: Purpose of the project and key consumer behavior insights (no more than 300 words)

· Current trends and consumer behavior ethics: What are trends related to consumer behavior within the industry as of 2022? What are some ethical

debates that concern customers today?

· Psychology of consumers: Address and explain the psychological factors that affect the behavior of the target audience (motivation, perception,

attitudes).

· Customer’s journey: Acknowledge and apply the (1) consumer decision-making process regarding this brand, and (2) the customer journey map (applied

to this company to). The latter should be developed as seen in class, using the visual representation of the framework. Make sure to identify strong and

weak points within the consumers’ journey.

· Strategic recommendations: Considering the report that you have developed, and the information analyzed, recommend two strategies for the

company to implement concerning consumer behavior. Make sure that they are specific, the company should know exactly what to do and how to do it; avoid using general statements or simply pointing out to strategies. Rather, fully develop them including all pertinent details and explaining why the company should do these two actions.

Formalities:

· Wordcount: minimum of 2000 and maximum of 2500 words.

· Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

· Font: Arial 11, 1.5 line spacing.

· The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Marketing homework help

Microeconomic Paper

Title

By Your Name

ECO100

Professor’s Name

Date

Microeconomic Paper

Title

Industry Goods and Services

(In this section you should select an industry and do research on that industry using Google and any other sources you like. [Remember, Wikipedia is not a valid source for academic work.] See the Assignment for specific instructions. Describe the industry and the goods and/or services this industry produces. Remember that an industry is a group of companies doing the same thing. For example, Ford is a company. Automobile manufacturing is an industry. Also identify some of the major companies in the industry and anything else about the industry that you think is interesting. Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

Describe a Microeconomic Variable for Your Industry

(In this section you should describe a microeconomic variable for your industry. Microeconomic variables for an industry include prices, sales, production, advertising, investment, etc. Include a graph, table, or chart showing values for this microeconomic variable over time. [Find a graph, chart, or table that has already been created and paste it into your paper. You do not need to create one. For example, if your industry is U.S. automobile manufacturing, Google, “U.S. automobile manufacturing over time.” Select the “images” option. Choose one of the graphs, charts, or tables. Then copy and paste it into your paper.] Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

How Government Might Impact the Industry

(Describe one way the government might impact this industry. Examples might include price controls, regulations, taxes, or any other way you can think of. Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

Sources

1. List in order of use. You need at least one.

2. List a second source here.

3. Repeat for additional sources.

2

Marketing homework help

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N-L44c7HKc

Watch above video and then submit a one page write up here. In this write-up, you will teach someone everything that was learned from the video. This is not a simple summary or regurgitation of information. Rather, you must organize the information and explain it in a way that helps someone else learn the material. You can use bullet points, diagrams, prose, or any other format that helps teach the material effectively.

Marketing homework help

Coursework 2 (60%) Individual report

You are required to write a 2000-word (+/- 10%) marketing plan based on assignment 1. The marketing plan should explore the future marketing strategies.

The submission deadline for coursework 2 is Monday 2nd May 2022 at 23:59 PM

Coursework 2: Content for the individual written report:

The report will include:

a) An overview on assessment of the current marketing environment based on part 1

b) An analysis of the organisation’s positioning and targeting strategy using perception maps, segmentation techniques and the principles of the 4Cs of effective positioning.

c) Based on a and b, you will be required to offer two recommendations for the future marketing plan of your chosen organisation.

d) Justification of
one of the two
recommendation (given in c) reinforced by the application of key strategic marketing models, i.e. the BCG Matrix and the Ansoff Matrix.

Coursework 2 Structure – The Report/Marketing Plan

Section

Content

Part a (20%)

After briefly introducing your organisation, this section requires you to provide a critical summary of your application and analysis of SWOT or PESTLE and Porter’s Five Forces, and the marketing mix framework in the context of the organisation you used in assignment 1. The outcome of this analysis should give a clear understanding of the environment within which your organisation operates.

Part b (20%)

This section requires you to assess how the organisation currently positions itself with its target audience/market. The use of perception maps here (2) gives you the opportunity to assess the organisation’s current positioning in relation to its competitors. You should also establish the segmentation technique(s) used by your organisation. The 4 Cs of Positioning should also be used to assess the effectiveness of the organisation’s positioning strategy.

Part c (10%)

This section gives you the opportunity to make two recommendations for the future. Based on a and b, you will be required to offer two recommendations for the future marketing plan of your chosen organisation.

Part d (30%)

This section requires you to provide justification of one of the two recommendation (given in c) reinforced by the application of key strategic marketing models, i.e. the BCG Matrix and the Ansoff Matrix.

Assignment style, structure and design: (10%)

Reports can and should contain diagrams, tables and models – just make sure they are put into the context of your organisation (anyone can copy a model). The text that you write alongside the visual here adds the depth to that visual. Combining the two together increases quality of communication and reader understanding. Think: Do customers ever purchase from marketers when they do not understand what they are being told? Remember – this assignment must take the form of a professional BUSINESS REPORT which clearly communicates with the reader, i.e. the Board of Directors of the selected organisation. This assignment must NOT come across as an essay or student assignment – it should feel like a business/marketing proposal.

Academic Referencing (10%)

Academic referencing for part 2 of the assignment is to be thorough. Citing sources of concepts/theories/models is essential. The role/purpose of all models used should also be briefly explained – again this can be done via the citation of a recognised writer (from a book, journal, etc.) A simple “rule of thumb” you might wish to follow: Introduce the concept/model/theory (cite/define), Explain what purpose it serves (cite), Apply the concept (this might be from your own observations, or possibly cited from research you have uncovered) and finally discuss the Implications of the situation (cite to evidence these implications where possible). All citations should feature at the end of your work as a list of references. NOTE: sources that lack the appropriate academic integrity – e.g. Wikipedia, Mindtools, Marketing4U, Smart insights, etc, are not acceptable and may result in a loss of marks. Established concepts, theories and academic models must use sources of academic integrity – for example textbooks from the module reading list, or original journal articles.

Sensitivity: Internal

Marketing homework help

MP_SNHU_withQuill_Horizstack

IHP 510 Module Eight Worksheet

For the Module Six worksheet task, you proposed marketing and communication strategies based on the target market and demographics for a department, program, or service of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

For this follow-up worksheet task in Module Eight, you will complete a basic budget for implementing the marketing strategies you proposed in the Module Six Worksheet. In this task, you will illustrate how you would allocate $100,000 among the three campaigns you proposed.

First, list the target market/demographic, the department/program/service, and the marketing technique for the three priorities you selected in the Module Six worksheet task.

Next, illustrate how you would allocate a portion of the funds for each priority. Be sure to consider direct, indirect, and hidden costs. Please see the example below.

Finally, describe why you made the budgeting choices around prioritization and specific costs. Be sure to include sources to validate the proposed costs.

Note: Although you are not being asked to prioritize your marketing tactics for a specific budget in your final healthcare marketing plan, this is an important exercise to complete as it is crucial to understand how healthcare organizations allocate funds for their marketing campaigns.

To complete this worksheet, replace bracketed text with the relevant information.

Example





Priority One: Here is where you list the target market/demographic, the department/program/service, and the marketing technique for the three priorities that you selected in the Module Six worksheet task. (Ex: white low-income, oral health, and television commercial/s.)

Funds Allocated for the Marketing Campaign: $50,000

Direct Costs

Scriptwriter $5,000

Actors and actresses $7,000

Airtime $10,500

Indirect Costs

Manager $15,000

Two staff $7,500

Hidden Costs

Outsourcing $5,000

Total Costs for Priority One: $50,000

Note: Based on this example, you would have $50,000 remaining for Priority Two and Three.

Priority One

Priority One: [Insert text.]

Funds Allocated for the Marketing Campaign: $ [Insert dollar amount.]

Direct Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Indirect Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Hidden Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Total Costs for Priority One: $[Insert dollar amount.]

Discussion: [Insert text.]

Priority Two

Priority Two: [Insert text.]

Funds Allocated for the Marketing Campaign: $ [Insert dollar amount.]

Direct Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Indirect Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Hidden Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Total Costs for Priority Two: $[Insert dollar amount.]

Discussion: [Insert text.]

Priority Three

Priority Three: [Insert text.]

Funds Allocated for the Marketing Campaign: $ [Insert dollar amount.]

Direct Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Indirect Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Hidden Costs

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

[Insert text.] $[Insert dollar amount.]

Total Costs for Priority Three: $[Insert dollar amount.]

Discussion: [Insert text.]

Marketing homework help

Microeconomic Paper

Title

By Your Name

ECO100

Professor’s Name

Date

Microeconomic Paper

Title

Industry Goods and Services

(In this section you should select an industry and do research on that industry using Google and any other sources you like. [Remember, Wikipedia is not a valid source for academic work.] See the Assignment for specific instructions. Describe the industry and the goods and/or services this industry produces. Remember that an industry is a group of companies doing the same thing. For example, Ford is a company. Automobile manufacturing is an industry. Also identify some of the major companies in the industry and anything else about the industry that you think is interesting. Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

Describe a Microeconomic Variable for Your Industry

(In this section you should describe a microeconomic variable for your industry. Microeconomic variables for an industry include prices, sales, production, advertising, investment, etc. Include a graph, table, or chart showing values for this microeconomic variable over time. [Find a graph, chart, or table that has already been created and paste it into your paper. You do not need to create one. For example, if your industry is U.S. automobile manufacturing, Google, “U.S. automobile manufacturing over time.” Select the “images” option. Choose one of the graphs, charts, or tables. Then copy and paste it into your paper.] Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

How Government Might Impact the Industry

(Describe one way the government might impact this industry. Examples might include price controls, regulations, taxes, or any other way you can think of. Please delete these instructions before submitting your paper.)

Sources

1. List in order of use. You need at least one.

2. List a second source here.

3. Repeat for additional sources.

2

Marketing homework help

Project Guidelines and Rubric.html

Competencies

In this project, you will demonstrate your mastery of the following competencies:

  • Apply elements of the marketing mix to inform business decisions that support organizational objectives
  • Determine appropriate marketing and communication distribution channels
  • Explain how marketing decisions are made to target the consumer

Scenario

Chocolate Bliss started as a small, family-owned store in Seattle, Washington in 1976. While once a boutique chocolatier selling handmade “secret family recipe” chocolate bonbons, the company today has a wider variety of product offerings including boxed chocolate candies, chocolate baking products, and carob (chocolate alternative) candies and health bars. Chocolate Bliss products are sold online and in their stores to consumers and to other businesses, specifically grocery stores, throughout the Northwest.

The company has maintained its “secret family recipe” brand even as it has expanded its product offerings, and today enjoys strong brand awareness in the states where it is sold.

The company’s primary competitors are:

  • Ghirardelli Chocolate Company
    • Chocolate Bliss’s higher-price range baking products, sold to grocery stores, compete directly with Ghirardelli.
    • Chocolate Bliss also competes with Ghirardelli for its boxed chocolate candies sold in their stores and online to consumers, and sold to grocery stores.
  • Nestlé
    • Chocolate Bliss’s mid-price range baking products, sold to grocery stores, compete directly with Nestlé.
  • Rise Bar
    • Chocolate Bliss competes with Rise Bar for its carob (chocolate alternative) products sold in their stores and online to consumers, and sold to grocery stores.

Chocolate Bliss is financially healthy and has plans to expand into the midwestern United States. This expansion will include the launch of a new product.

You have been with the company for a few years and have been selected to be on the team that will develop a marketing plan for the new product launch. The executives at Chocolate Bliss will use the marketing plan to make decisions about how to best use the marketing budget to ensure a successful product launch, so you need to have sound research and reasoning to support your work that will contribute to developing a marketing plan. You also realize that the marketing plan is not just about a successful product launch; it is about building the Chocolate Bliss brand and positioning the company strongly against its competitors, especially when it comes to price point.

Three chocolate bonbon candies

Directions

  1. Product Selection: Begin by selecting which product you want to be the basis of your entire project. Specifically, choose one of the following products:
    • Gourmet truffles with fruit, herb, and flower extract infusions
    • Semisweet chocolate baking chips
    • “Healthy” carob (chocolate substitute) bars

Then, based on your product selection, complete the components below, which will contribute to the development of a marketing plan. You will use the Marketing Plan Strategy Template in the What to Submit section to help structure your marketing plan submission.

  1. Persona (Target Market): Research the target market (potential buyers) for your chosen product to develop a persona. Specifically, address the following:
    1. Conduct target market research to identify key demographic and psychographic characteristics.
    2. Develop one persona that represents users of your chosen product. Use the Module Two Milestone Worksheet in your Soomo webtext to create your persona.
    3. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Two milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your persona as needed for inclusion in your project submission.
  1. Promotion: Recommend marketing communication channels for your chosen product. Specifically, address the following:
    1. Recommend two marketing communication channels for your chosen product. Briefly describe each and explain why they are appropriate based on your persona.
    2. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Four milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your marketing communication channel selections as needed for inclusion in your project submission.
  1. Price: Consider how pricing for your chosen product should be set. Specifically, address the following:
    1. Explain how one of the following is used to determine the approach to pricing for any offering.
      • Company profitability
      • Competitor pricing
      • Target market price sensitivity
    2. Identify which one of the four basic pricing strategies you feel is most appropriate for your chosen product and persona from the Module Two milestone. Describe the general advantages and drawbacks of that pricing strategy.
    3. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Four milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your pricing strategy selection as needed for inclusion in your project submission.
  1. Place (Distribution Channels): Consider how decisions on distribution channels should be made. Specifically, address the following:
    1. Describe how one recent change in the marketplace (e.g., purchasing habits or social, economic, and political events) has affected distribution of products.
    2. Recommend one potential distribution channel for your chosen product and explain why it is appropriate, given your persona.
    3. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Five milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your distribution channel selection as needed for inclusion in your project submission.
  1. Product: Identify considerations for the ways in which your chosen product should be marketed. Specifically, address the following:
    1. Explain, in one to two paragraphs, how your chosen product should be marketed in relation to meeting the needs and wants of your persona (e.g., the features and benefits of your chosen product that directly address your persona’s needs and wants).
      1. Consider how a product you regularly purchase is marketed in terms of consumer needs and wants. What is the marketing message, and what other methods are used to convey the benefits of the product? Use this as a guide to describe how you would suggest marketing your chosen product to your persona.
    2. Describe, in one to two paragraphs, how bringing this product to the marketplace can help support and build the company’s brand.
      1. Describe the Chocolate Bliss brand based on the scenario. Explain how offering your chosen product is in alignment with the brand, and how bringing the product to the marketplace will help the company increase awareness of its brand.
  1. Evaluation: Identify how you would evaluate the effectiveness of the marketing plan. Keep in mind that you need to collect data on the target market and the competition.
    1. Identify two specific quantitative data-collection tools you should use and explain, in two to three paragraphs, how they can help you evaluate the marketing plan. Quantitative data comes in the form of numbers.
    2. Identify two specific qualitative data-collection tools you should use and explain, in two to three paragraphs, how they can help you evaluate the marketing plan. Qualitative data comes in the form of words and sentences.

What to Submit

To complete this project, you must submit the following:

Template: Marketing Plan Strategy Template
Submit this template as a Word document. Your submission should be no more than 4 pages in length. Sources should be cited according to APA style.

Project Rubric

Criteria Exemplary (100%) Proficient (85%) Needs Improvement (55%) Not Evident (0%) Value
Product Selection Clearly states the product selection from among the options provided N/A Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include naming a product that is an option in the project Does not attempt criterion 2
Persona (Target Market): Demographic Characteristics Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Develops a logical description of the required demographic characteristics of the target market based on information from appropriate research sources Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing more accurate or complete listings of demographic characteristics Does not attempt criterion 5
Persona (Target Market): Psychographic Characteristics Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Develops a logical description of the required psychographic characteristics of the target market based on information from appropriate research sources Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing more accurate or complete listings of psychographic characteristics Does not attempt criterion 5
Persona (Target Market): Persona Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Creates a plausible persona that includes all of the required elements Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include creating a more logical persona based on the research Does not attempt criterion 10
Promotion: Two Marketing Communication Channels Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Accurately describes two marketing communication channels and provides a logical explanation of why they are appropriate given the persona Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate description of the marketing communication channels, or a more cogent explanation of why the channels are appropriate for the persona Does not attempt criterion 10
Price: Approach to Pricing Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Clearly explains one of the factors used to determine product pricing Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more complete explanation of the chosen factor’s influence on price Does not attempt criterion 10
Price: Pricing Strategies Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Selects a pricing strategy appropriate for the product and persona and accurately describes its advantages and drawbacks Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate or thorough explanation of the pricing strategy, including advantages and drawbacks of the selected strategy, or providing a more cogent explanation as to why the pricing strategy is appropriate, given the persona Does not attempt criterion 10
Place (Distribution Channels): Recent Change in the Marketplace Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Clearly explains a recent change in the marketplace and how it has affected distribution of products Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more detailed description of the recent change or a more logical connection between the change and how it affected distribution of products Does not attempt criterion 10
Place (Distribution Channels): Distribution Channel Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Recommends a distribution channel and provides a logical explanation as to why it is appropriate for given the persona Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate or thorough explanation of the distribution channel or a more cogent explanation of why the distribution channel is appropriate, given the persona Does not attempt criterion 10
Product: Marketed Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Clearly explains ideas for how the product should be marketed that are appropriate given the persona Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more thorough explanation of ideas for marketing the product or a more logical connection between the marketing ideas and the persona’s needs and wants Does not attempt criterion 5
Product: Brand Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Provides a cogent description of how the product can support and build the brand Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more convincing description of how the product can support and build the brand Does not attempt criterion 5
Evaluation: Quantitative Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Selects two quantitative data-collection tools and clearly explains how they can be used to evaluate the marketing plan Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include recommending a more appropriate tool selection or providing a more thorough description of how the data collected can be used for evaluation Does not attempt criterion 5
Evaluation: Qualitative Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Selects two qualitative data-collection tools and clearly explains how they can be used to evaluate the marketing plan Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include recommending a more appropriate tool selection or a more thorough description of how the data collected can be used for evaluation Does not attempt criterion 5
Articulation of Response Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner Clearly conveys meaning with correct grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, demonstrating an understanding of audience and purpose Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors in grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, negatively impacting readability Submission has critical errors in grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, preventing understanding of ideas 4
Citations and Attributions Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with few or no minor errors Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with consistent minor errors Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with major errors Does not use citations for ideas requiring attribution 4
Total: 100%

Course Documents/AdobeStock_65355724.jpeg

Course Documents/MKT 205 Marketing Plan Strategy Template.docx

MKT 205 Marketing Plan Strategy Template

Complete this template by replacing the bracketed text with the relevant information for your marketing plan strategy.

Product Selection

[Insert text.]

Persona (Target Market)

[Insert text.]

Promotion

[Insert text.]

Price

[Insert text.]

Place (Distribution Channels)

[Insert text.]

Product

[Insert text.]

Evaluation

[Insert text.]

References

[Insert text.]

Marketing homework help

Title Page

This spreadsheet supports STUDENT analysis of the case “Netflix, Inc.: The Customer Strikes Back” (UVA-M-0834).
This spreadsheet was prepared by Rajkumar Venkatesan, Bank of America Research Associate Professor of Business Administration. Copyright © 2015 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All rights reserved. For customer service inquiries, send an e-mail tosales@dardenbusinesspublishing.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, posted to the Internet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden School Foundation.
Dec. 7, 2015

Base Data for CLV

NETFLIX, INC.: THE CUSTOMER STRIKES BACK
Data for Calculating Customer Lifetime Value
All values in thousands except margin per subscriber and subscriber acquisition cost.
Mar-01 Jun-01 Sep-01 Dec-01 Mar-02 Jun-02 Sep-02 Dec-02 Mar-03 Jun-03 Sep-03 Dec-03 Mar-04 Jun-04 Sep-04 Dec-04 Mar-05 Jun-05 Sep-05 Dec-05 Mar-06 Jun-06 Sep-06 Dec-06 Mar-07 Jun-07 Sep-07 Dec-07 Mar-08 Jun-08 Sep-08 Dec-08 Mar-09 Jun-09 Sep-09 Dec-09 Mar-10 Jun-10 Sep-10 Dec-10 Mar-11 Jun-11 Sep-11 Dec-11
Revenues $ 17,057 $ 18,359 $ 18,878 $ 21,618 $ 30,527 $ 36,360 $ 40,731 $ 45,188 $ 55,669 $ 63,187 $ 72,202 $ 81,185 $ 100,370 $ 120,321 $ 141,644 $ 138,276 $ 152,446 $ 164,027 $ 172,740 $ 193,000 $ 224,126 $ 239,351 $ 255,950 $ 277,233 $ 305,320 $ 303,693 $ 293,972 $ 302,355 $ 326,183 $ 337,614 $ 341,269 $ 359,595 $ 394,098 $ 408,509 $ 423,120 $ 444,542 $ 493,665 $ 519,819 $ 553,219 $ 595,922 $ 706,274 $ 769,714 $ 799,152
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total domestic from shareholder letter
$ 846,587
Cost of subscription 9,476 10,776 9,667 14,811 14,872 17,779 21,147 23,246 29,928 35,148 38,326 44,334 56,444 69,604 71,130 76,223 93,986 99,957 97,878 101,967 126,220 128,605 135,210 142,586 165,189 166,838 163,707 168,673 187,156 193,769 186,573 193,635 215,299 224,858 233,091 231,598 259,560 265,387 292,406 336,756 376,992 428,203 471,823
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
512,578
Fulfillment expenses 2,886 3,589 3,283 3,785 4,155 4,854 4,908 5,449 6,383 7,221 8,322 9,348 10,790 14,373 8,322 23,124 16,694 17,560 15,013 21,495 22,045 21,974 23,583 26,762 29,783 29,855 30,746 31,377 35,649 36,318 37,923 39,211 43,969 44,385 42,183 43,888 47,602 49,547 52,063 54,034 61,159 61,775 64,794
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
62,577
Technology and development 3,857 4,896 4,463 4,802 3,181 3,518 3,966 3,960 4,183 4,123 4,738 4,840 5,039 5,652 4,738 7,477 7,155 7,513 6,325 9,949 11,206 12,043 8,955 16,175 15,715 18,907 18,216 18,557 20,516 22,670 23,368 24,052 24,200 27,119 30,014 33,209 37,399 37,863 42,108 45,959 50,905 57,865 69,480
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
80,783
Paid subscribers: end of period 708 1,416 6,676 6,609 6,845 7,326 8,102 8,235 8,490 9,164 10,116 10,375 10,835 11,892 13,622 14,577 15,863 18,268 21,405 23,263 22,843
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
24,395
Paid subscribers: end of last period 633 1,242 6,154 14,577 15,863 18,268 21,405 23,263
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
22,843
Number of paid subscribers 303 306 315 456 562 598 671 857 1,009 1,055 1,172 1,224 1,631 1,933 2,080 2,308 2,687 2,998 3,266 3,725 4,380 4,876 5,253 5,823 6,415 6,643 6,727 7,086 7,714 8,169 8,363 8,827 9,640 10,246 10,605 11,364 12,757 14,100 15,220 17,066 19,837 22,334 23,053 23,619
Gross subscriber additions 186 88 107 186 312 236 277 315 417 327 383 444 760 583 590 783 945 707 921 1,156 1,377 1,070 1,310 1,493 1,520 1,028 1,297 1,495 1,862 1,384 1,528 2,085 2,413 1,936 2,180 2,803 3,492 3,059 4,101 5,649 6,299 5,315 4,714
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
5,216
Cost of revenues $ 12,362 $ 14,365 $ 12,950 $ 18,596 $ 19,027 $ 22,633 $ 26,055 $ 28,695 $ 36,311 $ 42,369 $ 46,648 $ 53,682 $ 67,234 $ 83,977 $ 79,452 $ 99,347 $ 110,680 $ 117,517 $ 112,891 $ 123,462 $ 148,265 $ 150,579 $ 158,793 $ 169,348 $ 194,972 $ 196,693 $ 194,453 $ 200,050 $ 222,805 $ 230,087 $ 224,496 $ 232,846 $ 259,268 $ 269,243 $ 275,274 $ 275,486 $ 307,162 $ 314,934 $ 344,469 $ 390,790 $ 438,151 $ 489,978 $ 536,617 $ 575,155
Subscriber acquisition cost (domestic after March 2011) $ 25.15 $ 46.48 $ 32.19 $ 33.24 $ 25.44 $ 34.13 $ 33.57 $ 33.31 $ 31.67 $ 30.45 $ 31.81 $ 32.89 $ 35.12 $ 35.12 $ 38.18 $ 49.39 $ 37.89 $ 37.25 $ 35.69 $ 49.59 $ 38.47 $ 43.95 $ 45.32 $ 61.66 $ 47.46 $ 44.02 $ 37.91 $ 34.60 $ 29.50 $ 28.95 $ 32.21 $ 26.67 $ 25.79 $ 23.88 $ 26.86 $ 25.23 $ 21.54 $ 24.37 $ 19.81 $ 11.13 $ 14.38 $ 15.09 $ 15.25
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
$ 15.62
Market capitalization $ 302,016 $ 214,069 $ 247,130 $ 467,582 $ 612,152 $ 813,092 $ 1,354,507 $ 1,758,750 $ 1,876,356 $ 806,512 $ 650,186 $ 574,670 $ 876,721 $ 1,402,472 $ 1,481,697 $ 1,609,235 $ 1,848,566 $ 1,552,548 $ 1,774,306 $ 1,594,591 $ 1,311,501 $ 1,727,984 $ 1,727,984 $ 2,132,708 $ 1,614,020 $ 1,825,626 $ 1,759,385 $ 2,510,605 $ 2,373,577 $ 2,522,867 $ 2,944,010 $ 3,853,800 $ 5,688,697 $ 8,473,995 $ 9,273,797 $ 12,487,968 $ 13,800,682 $ 5,947,128 $ 3,838,597
Share price 13.99 9.70 11.01 20.35 25.55 33.56 54.69 34.12 36.00 15.42 12.33 10.85 16.41 25.99 27.06 28.99 27.21 22.78 25.86 23.19 19.39 26.62 26.62 34.65 26.07 30.88 29.89 42.92 41.34 46.17 55.09 73.74 108.65 162.16 175.7 237.78 262.69 113.27 69.29
Outstanding shares 21,588 22,069 22,446 22,977 23,959 24,228 24,767 51,546 52,121 52,303 52,732 52,965 53,426 53,962 54,756 55,510 67,937 68,154 68,612 68,762 67,638 64,913 64,913.00 61550.00 61,911 59,120 58,862 58,495 57,416 54,643 53,440 52,262 52,358 52,257 52,782 52,519 52,536 52,504 55,399

Marketing homework help

Coursework 2 (60%) Individual report

You are required to write a 2000-word (+/- 10%) marketing plan based on assignment 1. The marketing plan should explore the future marketing strategies.

The submission deadline for coursework 2 is Monday 2nd May 2022 at 23:59 PM

Coursework 2: Content for the individual written report:

The report will include:

a) An overview on assessment of the current marketing environment based on part 1

b) An analysis of the organisation’s positioning and targeting strategy using perception maps, segmentation techniques and the principles of the 4Cs of effective positioning.

c) Based on a and b, you will be required to offer two recommendations for the future marketing plan of your chosen organisation.

d) Justification of
one of the two
recommendation (given in c) reinforced by the application of key strategic marketing models, i.e. the BCG Matrix and the Ansoff Matrix.

Coursework 2 Structure – The Report/Marketing Plan

Section

Content

Part a (20%)

After briefly introducing your organisation, this section requires you to provide a critical summary of your application and analysis of SWOT or PESTLE and Porter’s Five Forces, and the marketing mix framework in the context of the organisation you used in assignment 1. The outcome of this analysis should give a clear understanding of the environment within which your organisation operates.

Part b (20%)

This section requires you to assess how the organisation currently positions itself with its target audience/market. The use of perception maps here (2) gives you the opportunity to assess the organisation’s current positioning in relation to its competitors. You should also establish the segmentation technique(s) used by your organisation. The 4 Cs of Positioning should also be used to assess the effectiveness of the organisation’s positioning strategy.

Part c (10%)

This section gives you the opportunity to make two recommendations for the future. Based on a and b, you will be required to offer two recommendations for the future marketing plan of your chosen organisation.

Part d (30%)

This section requires you to provide justification of one of the two recommendation (given in c) reinforced by the application of key strategic marketing models, i.e. the BCG Matrix and the Ansoff Matrix.

Assignment style, structure and design: (10%)

Reports can and should contain diagrams, tables and models – just make sure they are put into the context of your organisation (anyone can copy a model). The text that you write alongside the visual here adds the depth to that visual. Combining the two together increases quality of communication and reader understanding. Think: Do customers ever purchase from marketers when they do not understand what they are being told? Remember – this assignment must take the form of a professional BUSINESS REPORT which clearly communicates with the reader, i.e. the Board of Directors of the selected organisation. This assignment must NOT come across as an essay or student assignment – it should feel like a business/marketing proposal.

Academic Referencing (10%)

Academic referencing for part 2 of the assignment is to be thorough. Citing sources of concepts/theories/models is essential. The role/purpose of all models used should also be briefly explained – again this can be done via the citation of a recognised writer (from a book, journal, etc.) A simple “rule of thumb” you might wish to follow: Introduce the concept/model/theory (cite/define), Explain what purpose it serves (cite), Apply the concept (this might be from your own observations, or possibly cited from research you have uncovered) and finally discuss the Implications of the situation (cite to evidence these implications where possible). All citations should feature at the end of your work as a list of references. NOTE: sources that lack the appropriate academic integrity – e.g. Wikipedia, Mindtools, Marketing4U, Smart insights, etc, are not acceptable and may result in a loss of marks. Established concepts, theories and academic models must use sources of academic integrity – for example textbooks from the module reading list, or original journal articles.

Sensitivity: Internal

Marketing homework help

Marketing Coca-Cola in Honduras: Corporate Social Responsibility Issues

Mission Trip Recap

“I know we’re doing a lot of good here, but I’m getting tired of holding children down while we pull their teeth,” Alexa blurted. The group of 30 adult missioners visiting rural Honduras was conducting the nightly “reflections” session as they looked back on the high and low points of their day. “I’m glad we can relieve their pain, but it is so hard to come back year after year and see these kids drinking heavily sugared soft drinks and continuing the cycle”.

Most of the volunteers had made the trip to Honduras in previous years, so they knew what to expect. To keep from getting intestinal diseases, the missioners took prescription anti-biotics every day of the trip. They washed their hands frequently and after drying, used hand sanitizer. Twice a day they took Pepto-Bismol to protect themselves, and avoided any food that was washed with water, including salads, vegetables and fruit that wasn’t peeled. The sponsoring church purchased cases of bottled water to keep the team members hydrated and healthy during their visit.

As Americans, the team members were accustomed to having an ample supply of clean, safe water, because for longer than their lifetimes, public water in the US was universally disinfected. There was no familiarity with the radical improvement in public health when chlorination of pubic, semi-public and even private water supplies occurred. For example, death rates from typhoid, a waterborne disease, dropped from 36 per 100,00 in 1900 to fewer than 20 people in the entire US in 1960. Even without industrial pollution, fresh water may be contaminated by naturally-occurring micro-organisms. Aside from drinking untreated water, people can become sick from bathing, preparing food, or washing with contaminated water. Additionally, in the US, fluoride is an additive during the treatment process, reducing tooth decay for millions.

The team included two physicians, a nurse-practitioner, two oral surgeons, an RN, and many volunteers to set up a makeshift clinic and pharmacy in the basement of a church. Sheets suspended by wires served as walls to separate the dental clinic from medical examining rooms. Local bilingual high school students were hired to supplement the Spanish-speaking skills in the clinic. The week-long clinic helped a medically underserved village, and the pharmacy was stocked with the recognition that many patients would not see a doctor or dentist until the next mission trip in a year. Almost 700 villagers were treated in the course of a week. Children were often treated for intestinal parasites or worms, and were given a six-month supply of vitamins to combat inadequate diets.

Pulling rotting teeth was the most common treatment in the dental clinic. Even young children and teens lost permanent teeth to avoid the pain of severe cavities. A few toddlers had baby teeth turning black from drinking cola drinks in their bottles after weaning. A two-year old girl prompted Alexa’s worry about holding down screaming children. Sadly, the volunteers were coming back to the same problems they had dealt with in previous years. Is there nothing that can be done?

Living Conditions in Rural Honduras

Honduras is frequently cited as the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere (after Haiti), and it has the highest murder rate in the world. Only about 22% of the country’s population live in the major cities, with the majority residing in rural areas and villages. Most of the population lives in the mountainous region in the Western half of the country.

The impact of poverty is considerable. Most Hondurans live in bahareques, which are huts with dirt floors that are generally one or two rooms. The roofs are frequently made of corrugated metal, although wealthier homes have tile roofs and electricity. If running water is available, it is often contaminated with the microscopic parasite, Giardia, which can cause fatigue, diarrhea, cramping and weight loss. Upscale hotels serve ice made with purified water and warn patrons to use bottled water to brush their teeth and for other needs.

Because there is little electricity, the average Honduran has no way to refrigerate food and must cook over a wood fire. Hotels, businesses and wealthier homes have windows, and electricity provides air conditioning, refrigeration and other appliances usually seen in more developed countries; they also have generators. The government cannot produce enough electrical power to reach every region, so planned blackouts occur once or twice every week. Hotels, some businesses, and upscale homes rely on generators to power their appliances and lights during blackouts.

While agriculture is the main source of income, many people are malnourished, or don’t have sufficient food. What they can afford is purchased from street vendors daily, as well as local shops and restaurants. The average family subsists on corn, beans, rice and occasionally, meat. Along the major highways, there are food stands painted with the colors and logos of Coca-Cola or Pepsi about every mile. These two companies enjoy deep market penetration in the rural regions and urban settings alike. Doctors and public health officials complain that soda consumption contributes to malnutrition, dental disease and soaring rates of diabetes and obesity as soda replaces water and other beverages. In some places, soda is cheaper than pure water. Even in Mexico, a comparatively prosperous neighbor, studies estimate that one in six diabetes cases is directly linked to soda consumption and diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, affecting 13 million people.

Cultural Considerations

In addition to radically different economic environments, the cultures of the two countries vary considerably. Before the mission began, some volunteers researched Honduran cultural norms to better understand the people they were helping. Psychologist Geert Hofstede identified descriptors for cultures around the world, allowing relative contrasts between cultures. Only four of Hofstede’s six factors have been studied in Honduras, but the differences between Honduran cultural norms and American ones are relevant.

Hofstede’s Dimensions Scaled 1 to 100

Power Distance

Individualism

Masculinity

Uncertainty Avoidance

Honduras

80

20

40

50

United States

40

91

62

46

Power Distance describes attitudes about the inequality of power in a society. Honduras, with a score of 80, shows a culture that accepts inequality as a way of ife. Individuals expect that the powerful (political and corporate) make the rules and there is little the individual can do to change the status quo. Americans, on the other hand, are judged to have a low power distance, meaning that American culture expects a more equal treatment of all groups.

Individualism describes the degree of interdependence that members of a society have with each other. American society has a score of 91, indicating that the freedom of individuals is very important in the culture. Hondurans, with a score of 20, would be rated a collectivistic society, where long-term commitment to the group (family, extended family, village) is more important than individual success.

The contrast between the two cultures on the scale of masculinity is less intense but still notable. A score above 50 (such as the US at 62) indicates a society driven by achievement, competition and success. A score below 50 (such as Honduras at 40) describes a more feminine society characterized by enjoying consensus, solidarity and quality of life free from conflict.

Finally, comparison between the two cultures on the concept of uncertainty avoidance shows little difference between the two cultures. Grappling with the inability to know what will happen in the future, both Hondurans and Americans are willing to plan, take risks, and be flexible. Neither culture feels overly threatened by new ideas or ways of doing things like those in a culture with a very high uncertainty avoidance.

Coca-Cola and Pepsi Sales in Honduras

As the demand for cola beverages and other carbonated sodas matured in the United States, both Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola sought out international markets to become global corporations. By 2014, Brian Smith, President of Coca-Cola’s Latin American Group, commented that nearly one-third of the company’s global volume in sales came from his territory. The Latin American Group covers Mexico, Brazil, Central America (including Honduras and neighboring Guatemala), South America and the Caribbean. Smith cites huge growth in sales since 2000, in spite of challenges with infrastructure, bureaucracy and economic conditions.

Producing and distributing beverages requires large amounts of drinkable water, leading to criticism that the leading manufacturers are depleting the watershed in countries where they produce sodas and other beverages. In 2007, Coca-Cola set a goal of replenishing the water it uses by the year 2020. In 2016, Coca-Cola announced they had met this goal five years ahead of schedule, although outside auditors concluded that the 191.9 billion liters of water they returned were not necessarily in the same locations where the water had been removed. Complaints about Coca-Cola’s water depletion were reported in Chiapas, Mexico, where residents had to purchase water when the wells ran dry near the FEMSA plant (the large Mexican Coca-Cola bottling affiliate).

Pepsi-Cola has responded by pledging to protect and restore watersheds in Latin American countries where it operates. Beginning in early 2017, Pepsi has initiatives to replace the water at the source from where it was taken, along with planting native trees and other plants to reduce soil erosion, and putting up fences to keep cattle out of environmentally fragile areas.

In spite of these efforts, both companies face charges of greenwashing, or diverting attention from other environmentally dangerous practices by highlighting other improvements.

Coca-Cola’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Programs

Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola have both found ways to prosper in an impoverished country. They have overcome challenges with pure water to manufacture large amounts of beverages locally, providing a safe source of liquid and calories. They have provided jobs for local citizens through the manufacture and distribution of their products. The firms have extensive distribution networks that deliver products to the most remote villages in a country with poor and sometimes inaccessible roads.

Coca-Cola has an extensive list of initiatives in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The 2016 Sustainability Report describes efforts to protect agriculture with sustainable sourcing, improvements in human and workplace rights, water stewardship, responsible packaging and recycling, women’s economic empowerment, and donations of over $106 Million dollars to help customers around the world. The company has pledged to gradually reduce sugar to meet World Health Organization recommendations that people take less than 10% of their total energy/calorie consumption from sugar. New product lines focus on alternatives to soda, including organic tea, coconut water, juices, purified water and ultra-filtered milk products that have higher protein and calcium and longer shelf life than typical milk products. They also pledge not to target children under 12 in advertising, and to make nutritional information available to consumers.

Someone should to do something – Back to the Mission group

By the end of the week-long trip missioners were unified in wanting to attack the problems of poverty, disease, tooth decay and unclean water, but the more they researched causes of the problem, the harder it became to pin responsibility on any one group. The people in a poverty-stricken nation are not in a position to solve the problem alone. Their government is not able to supply basic infrastructure needs for the whole country. Churches and nonprofit organizations are contributing help in many ways, but the problems are entrenched and hard to solve. Many global corporations are also making significant contributions to the welfare of people in Honduras and other Central American countries.

There are several questions remaining to be answered. Who is responsible for the problem? Who has the means to solve the problem? Are there unintended consequences at work? If Coca-Cola and Pepsi stopped selling soft drinks in Honduras, would the people be better off? Are children drinking soda from a bottle better off drinking unsanitary water that will make them sick? Are malnourished people better off if they still can’t afford calories to fight hunger?

Alternatives

Members of the mission team brainstormed about possible interventions to reduce the impact of tooth decay, diabetes and malnutrition. Some of the suggestions included: (1) Encourage Coca-Cola to use some of the clean water produced and their intensive distribution in the country to sell fluoridated water at affordable prices; (2) Encourage Coca-Cola to partner with non-profit organizations, such as Rotary International, Water for People, Water.org, etc. to fund clean water delivery systems to rural villages; and (3) Encourage Coca-Cola to introduce healthier alternatives to soda, such as individually packaged milk products with long shelf life that do not require refrigeration (similar to the Fairlife brand sold in the United States) so that children could drink liquids safely while gaining nutrients.

Conclusion

Each recommended alternative has an opportunity to make things better for Hondurans. However, no one solution seems to address all the interconnected problems. At the end of the day, the people of Honduras will still be living with poverty, unsanitary conditions, and lack of medical care and infrastructure, regardless of efforts of global companies and visiting missionaries. Will any of these solutions have any long-term impact?

Case Instructions

Read the above case and then demonstrate understanding of the key concepts from the textbook (especially the noted chapters in some questions) in your written analysis of the case. Your paper will be written as a Word Document (Ariel 10 point, single-spaced, with double-spaces between paragraphs). Answer the questions as you follow the standard format for cases:

Your name, title and date

1. Introduction

1. Incorporating questions 1 and 2

2. Situation Analysis – Global Business Environment Factors

1. Incorporating questions 3 and 4

3. Alternatives

1. Incorporate questions 5 and 6 as you consider the corporate social responsibilities of Coca-Cola.

4. Recommendation

1. Incorporate question 7

5. Implementation

1. Incorporate question 8

Discussion Questions

1. What are the major issues the church mission group is concerned with?

2. Who are the major stakeholder groups that need to be considered when analyzing the related problems of poverty, tooth decay, lack of pure water, and obligations of global business partners in Honduras?

3. What global environmental issues does Coca-Cola need to consider for the market in Central America? How is this different from the business environment in the United States? (CH 2 and CH 3). Be sure to contrast political and legal issues, economic issues and technology issues.

4. Discuss cultural diversity when comparing consumers in the United State and those in Honduras? What cultural factors are at work that influence the problem or possible solutions for a corporation doing business in Honduras? For example, comparing Hofstede’s 6D model, are there cultural differences between consumers in Honduras and the United States that need to be considered in forming plans? In what ways is the culture of Honduras similar to the United States? In what ways is it different? (CH 4)

5. Describe Coca-Cola’s social responsibility in Latin American dealings. What ethical standards should they use? (CH 5)

6. Evaluate at least two feasible alternatives suggested by the mission team for eliminating the problems.

7. Recommend one of the alternatives or propose and justify your own solution. What would be the outcome of your recommendation?

8. What would Coca-Cola have to do for this to work (implementation). What resources and timeline would your solution take?

Marketing homework help

Title Page

This spreadsheet supports STUDENT analysis of the case “Netflix, Inc.: The Customer Strikes Back” (UVA-M-0834).
This spreadsheet was prepared by Rajkumar Venkatesan, Bank of America Research Associate Professor of Business Administration. Copyright © 2015 by the University of Virginia Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA. All rights reserved. For customer service inquiries, send an e-mail tosales@dardenbusinesspublishing.com. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, posted to the Internet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of the Darden School Foundation.
Dec. 7, 2015

Base Data for CLV

NETFLIX, INC.: THE CUSTOMER STRIKES BACK
Data for Calculating Customer Lifetime Value
All values in thousands except margin per subscriber and subscriber acquisition cost.
Mar-01 Jun-01 Sep-01 Dec-01 Mar-02 Jun-02 Sep-02 Dec-02 Mar-03 Jun-03 Sep-03 Dec-03 Mar-04 Jun-04 Sep-04 Dec-04 Mar-05 Jun-05 Sep-05 Dec-05 Mar-06 Jun-06 Sep-06 Dec-06 Mar-07 Jun-07 Sep-07 Dec-07 Mar-08 Jun-08 Sep-08 Dec-08 Mar-09 Jun-09 Sep-09 Dec-09 Mar-10 Jun-10 Sep-10 Dec-10 Mar-11 Jun-11 Sep-11 Dec-11
Revenues $ 17,057 $ 18,359 $ 18,878 $ 21,618 $ 30,527 $ 36,360 $ 40,731 $ 45,188 $ 55,669 $ 63,187 $ 72,202 $ 81,185 $ 100,370 $ 120,321 $ 141,644 $ 138,276 $ 152,446 $ 164,027 $ 172,740 $ 193,000 $ 224,126 $ 239,351 $ 255,950 $ 277,233 $ 305,320 $ 303,693 $ 293,972 $ 302,355 $ 326,183 $ 337,614 $ 341,269 $ 359,595 $ 394,098 $ 408,509 $ 423,120 $ 444,542 $ 493,665 $ 519,819 $ 553,219 $ 595,922 $ 706,274 $ 769,714 $ 799,152
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total domestic from shareholder letter
$ 846,587
Cost of subscription 9,476 10,776 9,667 14,811 14,872 17,779 21,147 23,246 29,928 35,148 38,326 44,334 56,444 69,604 71,130 76,223 93,986 99,957 97,878 101,967 126,220 128,605 135,210 142,586 165,189 166,838 163,707 168,673 187,156 193,769 186,573 193,635 215,299 224,858 233,091 231,598 259,560 265,387 292,406 336,756 376,992 428,203 471,823
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
512,578
Fulfillment expenses 2,886 3,589 3,283 3,785 4,155 4,854 4,908 5,449 6,383 7,221 8,322 9,348 10,790 14,373 8,322 23,124 16,694 17,560 15,013 21,495 22,045 21,974 23,583 26,762 29,783 29,855 30,746 31,377 35,649 36,318 37,923 39,211 43,969 44,385 42,183 43,888 47,602 49,547 52,063 54,034 61,159 61,775 64,794
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
62,577
Technology and development 3,857 4,896 4,463 4,802 3,181 3,518 3,966 3,960 4,183 4,123 4,738 4,840 5,039 5,652 4,738 7,477 7,155 7,513 6,325 9,949 11,206 12,043 8,955 16,175 15,715 18,907 18,216 18,557 20,516 22,670 23,368 24,052 24,200 27,119 30,014 33,209 37,399 37,863 42,108 45,959 50,905 57,865 69,480
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
total cost of revenue from financials
80,783
Paid subscribers: end of period 708 1,416 6,676 6,609 6,845 7,326 8,102 8,235 8,490 9,164 10,116 10,375 10,835 11,892 13,622 14,577 15,863 18,268 21,405 23,263 22,843
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
24,395
Paid subscribers: end of last period 633 1,242 6,154 14,577 15,863 18,268 21,405 23,263
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
22,843
Number of paid subscribers 303 306 315 456 562 598 671 857 1,009 1,055 1,172 1,224 1,631 1,933 2,080 2,308 2,687 2,998 3,266 3,725 4,380 4,876 5,253 5,823 6,415 6,643 6,727 7,086 7,714 8,169 8,363 8,827 9,640 10,246 10,605 11,364 12,757 14,100 15,220 17,066 19,837 22,334 23,053 23,619
Gross subscriber additions 186 88 107 186 312 236 277 315 417 327 383 444 760 583 590 783 945 707 921 1,156 1,377 1,070 1,310 1,493 1,520 1,028 1,297 1,495 1,862 1,384 1,528 2,085 2,413 1,936 2,180 2,803 3,492 3,059 4,101 5,649 6,299 5,315 4,714
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
5,216
Cost of revenues $ 12,362 $ 14,365 $ 12,950 $ 18,596 $ 19,027 $ 22,633 $ 26,055 $ 28,695 $ 36,311 $ 42,369 $ 46,648 $ 53,682 $ 67,234 $ 83,977 $ 79,452 $ 99,347 $ 110,680 $ 117,517 $ 112,891 $ 123,462 $ 148,265 $ 150,579 $ 158,793 $ 169,348 $ 194,972 $ 196,693 $ 194,453 $ 200,050 $ 222,805 $ 230,087 $ 224,496 $ 232,846 $ 259,268 $ 269,243 $ 275,274 $ 275,486 $ 307,162 $ 314,934 $ 344,469 $ 390,790 $ 438,151 $ 489,978 $ 536,617 $ 575,155
Subscriber acquisition cost (domestic after March 2011) $ 25.15 $ 46.48 $ 32.19 $ 33.24 $ 25.44 $ 34.13 $ 33.57 $ 33.31 $ 31.67 $ 30.45 $ 31.81 $ 32.89 $ 35.12 $ 35.12 $ 38.18 $ 49.39 $ 37.89 $ 37.25 $ 35.69 $ 49.59 $ 38.47 $ 43.95 $ 45.32 $ 61.66 $ 47.46 $ 44.02 $ 37.91 $ 34.60 $ 29.50 $ 28.95 $ 32.21 $ 26.67 $ 25.79 $ 23.88 $ 26.86 $ 25.23 $ 21.54 $ 24.37 $ 19.81 $ 11.13 $ 14.38 $ 15.09 $ 15.25
Shively, Daniel: Shively, Daniel:
from quarterly shareholder letter
$ 15.62
Market capitalization $ 302,016 $ 214,069 $ 247,130 $ 467,582 $ 612,152 $ 813,092 $ 1,354,507 $ 1,758,750 $ 1,876,356 $ 806,512 $ 650,186 $ 574,670 $ 876,721 $ 1,402,472 $ 1,481,697 $ 1,609,235 $ 1,848,566 $ 1,552,548 $ 1,774,306 $ 1,594,591 $ 1,311,501 $ 1,727,984 $ 1,727,984 $ 2,132,708 $ 1,614,020 $ 1,825,626 $ 1,759,385 $ 2,510,605 $ 2,373,577 $ 2,522,867 $ 2,944,010 $ 3,853,800 $ 5,688,697 $ 8,473,995 $ 9,273,797 $ 12,487,968 $ 13,800,682 $ 5,947,128 $ 3,838,597
Share price 13.99 9.70 11.01 20.35 25.55 33.56 54.69 34.12 36.00 15.42 12.33 10.85 16.41 25.99 27.06 28.99 27.21 22.78 25.86 23.19 19.39 26.62 26.62 34.65 26.07 30.88 29.89 42.92 41.34 46.17 55.09 73.74 108.65 162.16 175.7 237.78 262.69 113.27 69.29
Outstanding shares 21,588 22,069 22,446 22,977 23,959 24,228 24,767 51,546 52,121 52,303 52,732 52,965 53,426 53,962 54,756 55,510 67,937 68,154 68,612 68,762 67,638 64,913 64,913.00 61550.00 61,911 59,120 58,862 58,495 57,416 54,643 53,440 52,262 52,358 52,257 52,782 52,519 52,536 52,504 55,399

Marketing homework help

Battery Sharing

Blayne Kelly

Marketing Principles

Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College

April 27, 2022

Summary

Our initial product is the iPhone X & newer. The initial product has wired and wireless charging but with this innovation, you will be able to share battery charging through bluetooth and our app. Our app will work similar to Cash App and Venmo but with battery percentages that you are sending to your peers with low battery percentage.

Company Background

Apple was founded on April 1, 1976 by two college dropout students, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. For them, it was all about making computers so compact they could be used at home or in the workplace. iPhone, Services, Mac, iPad, and Wearable’s, Home, and Accessories are just a few examples of the company’s many divisions. .The industries that Apple competes in are Consumer electronics, software and online services. Consumer gadgets, software, and internet services are all areas in which Apple is active. Your Mac or iPhone’s logo pays homage to computer pioneer Alan Turing, whose work on artificial intelligence and decoding German military codes helped lay the groundwork for the modern computer.

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

You will not have to worry about bringing a charger everywhere you go.

Has amazing OS and Software hence high speed and more flexible.

Weaknesses

The other phone’s battery % may not last as long as the time you spend charging your phone.

Additional limitations that are not necessary. It’s not possible to enlarge the storage capacity of the Apple iPhone since the battery is incorporated into the device.

Opportunities

Maximize profit

Continued advancement of technology

Threats

Competition from other mobile phone manufacturers, such as Android, that may attempt to create a device that is similar.

Apple’s present brand value might be eroded over time if there is no more innovation or Steve Jobs to lead the company.

Strategic Analysis

All throughout the globe, to make sure and reduce the risk of people’s phones dying.

To swap battery life amongst others.

In order to ensure that your phone will never again die.

To design a high-end iPhone in which the customer experience is more crucial than having a bevy of functions accessible.

To ensure high-speed and easier accessibility via technological means.

Apple’s primary goal in releasing these images of the iPhone X is to draw attention away from the device’s technical specifications and toward its enjoyable features.

To demonstrate Apple’s approach for the future of smartphones.

To deliver the greatest personal computer devices and support to learners, educators, designers, scientists and engineers in over 140 countries across the globe is Apple’s company purpose.

The corporate mission of Apple Inc. is to “create the finest goods on Earth and to exit the world a better place than we got it.

Competitive Analysis

Market Segmentations

Age and Gender – This device might be used by people of all ages and genders who have a mobile phone and are in need of a charge.

Spending Power – This moderately priced item would be accessible to individuals of all socioeconomic backgrounds.

Reasons for buying – The most common reasons for purchasing the product would be to borrow a charge from a friend for a little fee and gain a larger percentage of battery life to carry you through the day.

Competition : Samsung and other major brands may opt to provide a comparable product at a lower cost.

Target Market : Teenagers and adults who own phones or tablets.

Differentiation : The powerful charging power provided by just one app will provide your phone a full day’s worth of battery life, setting our device apart from the competition.

Marketing Mix

Product- Our product will be accessible for all iPhone users having an iPhone X and newer. The target audience are mostly the teenagers and the adults who mostly use smartphones. Since this is an app, packaging is not an issue. The features will be in the ability to transfer charge to other’s phones.

Price- The monthly fee will be $10.99 with an initial 7-day free trial and a 5% discount the first month after the trial period. This will attract customers to try the app.

Place- It is expected that our product will be offered on the App Store. This will enable the customers to easily reach the product without any problem.

Promotion- Our product will be promoted globally since Apple goods are prevalent in many nations, including the United States. Commercials and print advertising will be used to sell the app, highlighting how it differs from those of their rivals. When a product is initially introduced to the market, commercials and print advertisements are used to promote it.

Implementation Plan & Marketing Calendar

We decided to roll out our project app and promote through many channels such as Walmart, Target, Best Buy, and any phone networking places where Apple phones can be purchased, as well as, through social medias and television commercials. The estimated time period for our product to get around in the market is approximately one to six months after initial release of the app. The product would be a permanent sales option for continued use. The product would be available for sale indefinitely, allowing it to be used and sold indefinitely.

Battery Sharing

Thank you for shopping!

Marketing homework help




HR Policy and Procedure Manual Template

Note: Delete this and the next three pages once you complete tailoring the template for your own business.

Who should use this template?

This manual is designed to be used by any small business owner or operator who employs people in their business.

Why use a HR policy and procedure manual?

In short, this manual helps you to establish robust structure and a basic set rules that you will use to manage your people on a day to day basis.

This is important because using a structured approach from day one will help you to ensure:

· that: you meet your basic legal obligations

· that you help your people managers to make consistent and reliable decisions – this promotes a culture of fairness

· that you have established a clear understanding of expectations, rules and consequences

· that you welcome and introduce your employees to your business and their new job

It takes some effort to complete, but brings definite long-term benefits as it will minimise the incidence of people reverting to their own set of rules which in turn reduces disputes or grievances caused by confusion, and it adds to the overall professionalism of your business operations.

How to complete this template

Designed to be customised

This template for a HR manual is made up of example topics and sections. It is completely customisable based on your specific requirements, in fact the more time you spend tailoring it to your specific requirements the more effective it will be.

Include what you must and can comply with

This document should be used in conjunction with your contract of employment, and any specific company procedures and processes. Only include the commitments you are confident you can comply with, make sure you update and review the document regularly.

Important: You may have legal obligations to your employees under an employment or industrial agreement such as an award, workplace agreement or employment contract. Make absolutely certain what’s written in this document is consistent with these. If you’re unsure what covers your employees, contact Fair Work Australia by calling the Fair Work Ombudsman Infoline on 13 13 94.

To complete the template:

1. Guidance text appears throughout the document, marked by the word Guidance. Where you see a guidance note, read and then delete it. Guidance has been added to help you complete the template and should not appear in your final version.

2. Using Word’s Replace function, search for {Business Name} and replace with your company name.

a) In Word’s Home ribbon, open the Find and Replace tool, choose Replace to open the Find and Replace tool. The Find and Replace dialog opens with the Replace tab selected.

b) Enter {Business Name} in the Find what field.

c) Enter your company name in the Replace with field.

d) Click Replace All

The Find what field in the Find and Replace dialog is populated with <Business Name> and the Replace with field is populated with your company name. The Replace All button is highlighted.”>
</p>
<p>3. Replace {items in angle brackets}with your own wording. </p>
<p>4. Where you see a reference to other policies, insert a link to another example policy that applies in your business </p>
<p>5. Once you have finished work on the template, delete the first four pages of the document.</p>
<p>6. Lastly refresh the page numbers in the table of contents. </p>
<p>· Right mouse click on the table of contents </p>
<p>· In the small menu that appears, choose ‘Update Field’ then ‘Update page numbers only’.<br />
<img src=

Other tips

· To stop this HR manual sitting on a desk collecting dust, make it a living document. Ask your people for their thoughts on how to improve it. Then review it every six months.

· Use this document as a key resource in your induction process.

· Leave the words ‘Document valid when printed only’ in the footer to remind the reader they might be using an out-of-date copy. (The ‘Last printed’ date automatically updates in the footer when you print. You don’t need to update this.) Try to destroy or archive all out-of-date copies.

· The writing style doesn’t need to be formal or longwinded to be effective. Use simple sentences and plain English to reduce the chance an employee or manager will be confused about the intent of your policy or the way to carry out a procedure.

Note: Delete this and the previous page once you complete the template.

Disclaimer

Important: You may have legal obligations to your employees under an agreement such as an award, workplace agreement or employment contract. Make absolutely certain what’s written in this document is consistent with these. If you’re unsure which agreement covers to your employees, visit Fair Work Online (fairwork.gov.au) or call the Fair Work Small Business Helpline on 13 13 94.

The information in this publication is for general guidance only. The State of Victoria does not make any representations or warranties (expressed or implied) as to the accuracy, currency or authenticity of the information. The State of Victoria, its employees and agents do not accept any liability to any person for the information or advice given in this document. Authorised by the Victorian Government, 121 Exhibition Street, Melbourne, 3000. © Department of Business and Innovation 2019.

HR Policy and Procedure Manual

Document valid when printed only

Last printed 21/01/2019 11:44:00 AM Page 1 of 4

38

Document valid when printed only

Last printed 21/01/2019 11:44:00 AM Page iv of iv









{Insert Company Logo Here}



Human Resources
Policy and Procedure Manual

Contents


Human Resources

Policy and Procedure Manual





1



Welcome





3



Our Company History





4



What We Do





5



Our Clients





6



Our mission, vision
and
values





7



Your employment





8



Business Environment





11



Code of Conduct Policy





14



Dress Code Policy





16



IT, Internet, Email
and
Social Media Policies





18



Recruitment





23



Induction





25



Training
and
Development





26



Probation





27



Occupational Health
and
Safety





28



Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)
and
Anti Bullying





32



Pregnancy at Work





38



Flexible Working Arrangements





41



Leave





44



Performance Management





53



Performance improvement





54



Grievance complaints





58



Conflict of Interest





59



Intellectual Property
and
Security





61



Environmental Best Practice





62



{
Business Name
}
– Policies and Declaration





64


Welcome

Guidance: It is important to welcome people to your organisation as well as explain the purpose of the manual. Below is an example to get you started.

Congratulations on your appointment and welcome to the team at {Business Name}! We are excited that you have decided to join us and look forward to a long, happy and successful partnership together. Our business is primarily about {insert relevant sentence such as delivering exceptional customer service}. You have been hired because we believe you can help us to deliver these high levels of customer satisfaction. We want to ensure that your interactions with other {Business Name} employees and our customers will reflect the value that {Business Name} places on {insert relevant information such as people, teamwork, bottom up management and our commitment to superior customer service}.

The purpose of this Manual is to introduce you to the {Business Name}, give you some information about our history, our clients and what we do. You will also find information about your terms and conditions and employment, our expectations around your behavior and our policies and procedures. This manual should be read in conjunction with your Contract of Employment.

This Manual is by no means an exhaustive guide to your employment with us. It has been developed to act as a resource and reference for you. The policies within this Manual are easily listed and easily accessed via the contents page. This Manual will be updated as required as our business evolves and grows. You will be notified of any changes as they occur. If you have any questions about the content please do not hesitate to contact {Insert Contact Name} on {03 9XXX XXXX}.


Our Company History

Guidance: In this section you should explain how your business started and how it has evolved into the business it is today, don’t be afraid to tell your personal story so that people can buy in to your vision and values. Below is an example to get you started.

The story of {Business Name} starts in 2008 when Janet Howie and Lucy Smith saw a gap in the SME market for quality Accounting Services. There was a need for more pragmatic, service focused providers who were willing to partner and grow with businesses and take on a role of a trusted business advisor.

Since 2008 {Business Name} now works with over 100 SME’s in Victoria across all industries..


{Business Name} aims to at all times maintain the upmost levels of service for our customers and strives to place itself at the forefront of Business Advisory Services within the Accounting industry.



What We Do

Guidance: In this section you should explain what your business does so an overview of products and services offered. Below is an example to get you started.

At {Business Name} we provide the following products and services to our clients:

· Compliance and Risk services

· Auditing services

· Company Secretarial administration

· Taxation services

· Business Advisory services

· General bookkeeping

· Reporting


Our Clients

Guidance: In this section you should outline the clients and industries that you service. Below is an example to get you started.

At {Business Name} we service many businesses from a variety of industries, we are proud to list the following clients:

{Insert Logos of your biggest clients here}


Our mission, vision and values

Guidance: It is important to communicate your purpose or roadmap for success. This includes where you are headed and the expected values and behaviours you want your people to demonstrate on the way.

Mission Statement:

Your roadmap should start with your mission, it declares your purpose as a company and serves as the standard against which you weigh your actions and decisions. For example, a Mission Statement for the Accounting businesses may be:

{Business Name}’s mission is to help our clients build and develop sustainable, profitable businesses.

Vision Statement:

Our aim is to be:

· Known for high quality outcomes

· Known for growth strategies

Values:

· Respected

· Trusted Advisors

· Experts

· Flexible


Your employment



Guidance: In this section you should tailor the information based on the general customs and practices of your business. Below is an example to get you started.

Your employment with {Business Name} is essentially governed by your contract of employment, {Business Name} Policies, in conjunction with this Manual. The following section provides general information regarding your pay, conditions and our expectations of you.

Payroll

Your pay cycle is {weekly/fortnightly/monthly}. Our pay cycle runs from Monday to Sunday over a two-week period and pays are processed on Tuesdays, fortnightly. Depending on which bank you use, some people may be able to access their pay on Thursdays because this is the day payroll is actually processed.

Pays will be automatically deposited electronically into the bank account details provided to {Business Name}.

Taxation payments are automatically deducted from your salary. Superannuation payments are paid into your nominated fund.

Changing Pay Details



Please advise the {Insert Position Title} via email should you wish to change any pay details like changing or closing your bank account. Please ensure you notify us prior to the date you wish for the change to be

Marketing homework help

STRATEGIC HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 2

Strategic Human Capital Management

Tenika Tassin

Colorado Technical University

HRMT620-2202B-01

May 8, 2022


Diagnosis

AGC has experienced problems that can be attributed to the organizational culture and the human resource management practices. The first problem is the decline in the profits. Although the company has established its operations in different continents, it is unable to achieve better performance. The second problem the company is facing is the poor human resource management. This is caused by the lack of understanding and establishment of the time that is required to enhance the employee training. There is also increased competition in the labor market because the company establishes its operations in industrial parks. There are poor policies on the training requirements of the employees as well as lack of motivation and performance measures to keep the employees motivated and willing to continue to work with the organization. The company also faces problems with the environment of operations where there are issues such as political and regulatory issues affecting the host countries and hence the performance of the company. These are issues that were diagnosed by the financial performance of the company. Irrespective of the implementation of various strategies, the company has been performing poorly financially.

Root-Causes of the Problems

The failure of the company to perform well in different environments is caused by various issues. First, the company considers the leadership of the country in terms of the market and the availability of the raw materials and labor. It however, does not study the environment to where the subsidiary is being set to determine the cultural sensitivity and the effects of the culture on the organization. As a result, the company sets up their operations in countries that do not bring competitive advantages to its performance. The establishment of the subsidiaries also lacked the organizational culture of the headquarters because they are set up to increase distribution of the products in different parts of the world. The problems are also caused by lack of proper employee management practices (AlManei et al., 2018). The company lacked proper measures to ensure the employees were thoroughly trained in all aspects of the company for effective performance. The rewards and salaries of the company needs to be competitive especially because they establish their operations in the parks. The management of the employees using the employees from the headquarters will result to poor motivation of the employees. This is because the locals will feel that they are less valued and the company cannot trust their skills. Thus, the approach will affect employee morale and increase turnover rate.

Intervention

AGC needs to take the right measures to make a turnaround in its performance and increase its standings in the industry. The first intervention is to ensure there are metrics that are used to analyze the financial efficiency of the in management of human resources. This includes the management of the costs of new hires, training costs, and relocation costs. The company should settle for the options of employees that increase performance and enhance competitiveness in the industry. The second intervention is the carrying out of feasibility studies to determine the likelihood of the company to succeed in the new environment based on the available economic and political factors (Huselid, 2018). The fact that the company has ignored this aspect has led to establishment of operations in areas where there are no competitive advantages. The company also needs to standardize the policies on host country operations and the role of the host due to cultural differences in the regions of operations. It is important to have an evaluation of the political, economic, legal, and cultural environment before establishment of operations.

Evaluation

The evaluation process is meant to determine whether the established measures are effective in enhancing the performance of the organization. Thus, using scorecards and dashboards, it is possible to determine the human resource training and performance. It will indicate the changes in training and appraisal over time. The second evaluation is to carry out the cost-benefit analysis of the initiatives and programs on human resources (Calzavara et al., 2020). This is a method that includes the determination of the costs incurred in training the employees and the income generated after these employees have the right skills at hand. The third evaluation is the benchmark analysis and measurements using the outside organizations. It is possible to have better performance by having the right analysis of the other companies and how they manage different situations in order to implement the same in the company.

References

AlManei, M., Salonitis, K., & Tsinopoulos, C. (2018). A conceptual lean implementation framework based on change management theory. Procedia cirp72, 1160-1165. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212827118302981

Calzavara, M., Battini, D., Bogataj, D., Sgarbossa, F., & Zennaro, I. (2020). Ageing workforce management in manufacturing systems: state of the art and future research agenda. International Journal of Production Research58(3), 729-747. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00207543.2019.1600759

Huselid, M. A. (2018). The science and practice of workforce analytics: Introduction to the HRM special issue. Human Resource Management57(3), 679-684. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/hrm.21916

Marketing homework help

Data Source Details (for Final Draft of Your Data Brief)

Use this as an example and type your own text

Data Source Name: Avocado Sales

Total # of records (rows): 18,250

Dimensions you plan to use:

Date, Region, State, City, Product Type

Metrics you plan to use:

Average Price, Total Units, Total Bags



Dashboard

1-sentence summary of what your dashboard will contain:

Sales distribution of Hass avocados across the US

List at least 5 different data elements that will be in your dashboard (charts, tables, etc.)

1. Table: KPI Summary – Volume and sales by region with YoY % differences

2. Chart: Line chart showing avocado sales over time (summarized for US)

3. Chart: line chart showing average price per unit over time (lines for each year)

4. Chart: bar chart showing the % of total avocado sales per region

5. List: Top 5 cities for avocado purchases and the total amount $ spent

6. Chart: column chart showing avocado sales by product description


Analysis Presentation

1-sentence summary of what your analysis will focus on:

Analysis of avocado consumption by region, state, and city to determine differences in demand and pricing.

List the specific questions you will ask/answer with your analysis:

· Compare avocado consumption across regions

· What is the trend over time for price and consumption qty?

· Is there a relationship between price and consumption?

· Do different regions favor specific product types?

Marketing homework help

Contents

Welcome 2
History 3
Service 3
Clients 4
Our mission, vision & values 4
Vision Statement: 4
Values: 4
Business Registration 5
Builders Registration Policy 6
Discrimination, Sexual Harassment and Bullying 16
Record Keeping 18





Policy and Procedure Manual

Welcome

Congratulations on your appointment and welcome to the team at Dans Construction Group! We are excited that you have decided to join us and look forward to a long, happy and successful partnership together. Our business is primarily about building and developing high quality properties in a timely and safe manner, and exceeding our client’s expectation every time.

You have been hired because we believe you can help us to achieve our goals in delivering a high quality product, beyond our customer’s satisfaction. We want to ensure that your interactions with other Dans Construction Group employees and stakeholders will reflect the values that Dans Construction Group places on its staff – by way of teamwork, bottom up management, job satisfaction and our commitment to superior customer service.

The purpose of this Manual is to introduce you to the Dans Construction Group, give you some information about our history, our clients and what we do. You will also find information about your terms and conditions and employment, our expectations around your behaviour and our policies and procedures. This manual should be read in conjunction with your

Contract of Employment.

This Manual is by no means an exhaustive guide to your employment with us. It has been developed to act as a resource and reference for you. The policies within this Manual are easily listed and easily accessed via the contents page. This Manual will be updated as required as our business evolves and grows. You will be notified of any changes as they occur. If you have any questions about the content, please do not hesitate to contact

Gordon MANN – General Manager, on 0418 340 850




History

The story of Dans Construction Group starts in 2000s when Yingning LI and Gordon MANN decided to combine their extensive knowledge and networks within the wall and ceiling lining, telecommunication and the construction industry.

Dans Construction Group is a privately owned boutique construction company specialising in residential and retail buildings. With a combined experience of over 50 years in the industry – both locally and internationally, the company’s leaders have a shared passion for constructing high quality buildings, with a commitment to innovation and creativity for long-term success.

Dans Construction Group aligns itself with only the best advisors, consultants, architects and designers to ensure each project exceeds our customers’ expectations, and cements an ongoing relationship so our purchasers keep coming back and become clients for life.


Service

At Dans Construction Group, and related entities, we provide the following:

· Development and Construction

· Building for Clients

· Provide Telecommunication Solution

· Innovative Building Methods – Wall Partition Systems and Solution


Clients

Our clients vary from homeowners, retirees, house flappers, domestic builders, newlyweds and property agents.


Our mission, vision & values


Mission Statement:

Dans Construction Group’s mission is to develop and construct buildings that stand the test of time through unique design and high-quality standards – for both ourselves and our valued clients.


Vision Statement:


Our aim is to be:

• Known for our highest regard for safety and employee wellbeing.

• Known for producing a quality product, on time and within budget.


Values:

· Safety

· Wellbeing of all

· Respect

· Integrity

· Excellence

· Punctuality


Business Registration

Dans Construction Group is registered using Australian Company Number (ACN) via the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

We are also resighted with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) using Business Registration Service (BRS) with the Australian Government.

Business Registration Checklist

Yes

No

Comment

Has a business name relating to the works been chosen

Have you registered an ABN

Have you registered a TFN

Have you registered GST

Has tax agent number been registered

Have you registered a PAYG

Have required licenses and permits been approved

Has a business website been set up?

Has trade mark been registered?


Builders Registration Policy

Dans Construction Group is registered with the Victorian Building Authority (VBA) in the following classes:

· Domestic Builder (Unlimited)

· Domestic Builder (Limited to sheet plastering)

We are certified in all areas in a domestic project from the beginning to the end. And we are also qualified in plaster wall systems.

We employ licensed building practitioner who are register VBA with the varies backgrounds or skills. Individuals who which to be a part of our team must apply with the document shown below.


Steps that need to be taken.


Step 1:

All applicants will first need to provide evidence of their relevant trade background certificates or experience.


Step 2:

All applicants need to provide relevant trade referee, as evidence that they were involved with that project.
All applicants note that the project that they were involved need to be $16,000 minimum, and provide at least 3 years of relevant experience.


Step 3:

All applicants need to provide with police check when submitting their photo ID.


Step 4:

Pay the relevant application fees and please note that the VBA may ask you for an interview.
In some cases, a writing exam is need to proof your relevant skills and qualifications.

Forms can be found on the VBA webpage.


https://www.vba.vic.gov.au/

All licenses obtain follows strict application requirement from the VBA.






Domestic Builder (Unlimited) Application form


Domestic Builder (Limited to sheet plastering)

Code of Conduct Policy


Purpose

This policy affirms Dans Construction Group belief in responsible social and ethical behaviour from all employees. This policy clarifies the standards of behaviour that Dans Construction Group expects of all employees.


Policy

This policy applies to all employees across Dans Construction Group and provide the backbone of the working with other employee or conducting business activities. Note that this policy act as a secondary backbone in enhancing a safe working environment, and promotes the professionalism within the each and individuals. This policy will not and must not overwrite, in conflict with any current legislation that is current to the time where the policy is written. This Code of Conduct Policy is based on:

· The practices of high level of integrity and the act of professionalism.

· The understanding of responsibility and transparency in relation to sensitive information, funds, facilities and equipment.

· The important of respect regards of class, faith or background.

· The practise of act of promoting the interest of the organisation.

· The practise of equal opportunities and fairness when dealing with business activity.

· Carry out responsibility with professionalism, integrity and care.

· Follows the direction of the policies and procedures and avoid any unlawful or law breaking practise in relation with the clients, subcontractors, suppliers and the organisation.

· Avoid any activities that maybe be corrupt, such as accepting gift or exchanging favours.

· Under any given condition should an employee accept any finical favours.

· Whistling, raising concern or reporting a suspicious activity, in accordance with following the correct policy and produce will not be put or place in any disadvantage position. All reported incident should be dealt with and all records will be kept and protect the identity of whistlers.

Any employee who breach the policy may result in disciplinary action or termination.

Dans Construction Group expect all employee should practise highest level of professionalism, integrity and responsivity.

Should an employee have doubts about any aspect of the Code of Conduct, they must seek clarification from Gordon Mann, General Manager.

This policy will be update and reviewed by Dans Construction Group, and any necessary changes will be updated in accordance to the legislation in the time of this policy is written.



Dress Code Policy




Dans Construction Group main focus is set a standard for workplace dress code that is safe and comfortable. This create a professional image which enable us to create credibility with the clients, customer and the supplier. At Dans Construction Group, a standard uniform will be provided for every employee.



Office Employee




For office employees are required to dress business causal for work hours, a black polo shirt with the company’s branding will be providing for all office employees. For bottoms, employees may choose to wear jeans, Skirts or black office pants. When on site, office employees are required to put on black hard hat with the company branding, company branded hi-vi vest and a pair of steel cap boots.



Warehouse Employee/Delivery Drivers




For warehouse employee are required to put on Personal Protection Equipment throughout the course of the shift. A yellow hard hat with the company branding will be provide together with a company branded hi-vi vest. For delivery drivers, a blue hard hat with the company branding will be provided. Employee must wear cargo pants or workpants together with steel cap boots throughout their shift. For delivery drivers, they must wear work pants with reflective strips on.



On-Site Employee




For on-site employee are required to put on Personal Protection Equipment throughout the course of the shift. A white hard hat with the company branding will be provide together with a company branded hi-vi vest. For foramens and supervisor, a red hard hats with the company branding will be provided. Employee must wear cargo pants or workpants together with steel cap boots throughout their shift.




Supply and Purchasing




The commencement of the employment of a new employee, a set of uniform will be provided by the company. Should an employee need to place in order for a new uniform, hardhats or hi-vi vest, additional cost will be send as an invoice. Order needed to be placed for new uniforms, hence employees will dress as per instruction from management until a uniform is distributed. New uniforms will be given to employees when under the management’s discrete. When an employee chose to leave the company, he/she will be required to give back the uniforms.




Maintenance




All uniforms worn, including hard hats should be clean, neatly and within the warranty pressed at all times.


Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)



Policy



This policy applies to all employee across Dans Construction Group, including contractors and overarch all business activities both internally and externally by Dans Construction Group. This policy also covers work related training sponsored by Dans Construction Group.



This policy will be used in all promotion, recruitment and selection decisions.



The aim of the Equal Opportunity Policy is to maximums the business potential by:



•attracting and retaining the best possible employees



• providing a workplace that is safe, respectful and flexible for all individual across the company



• delivering our services in a safe, respectful and reasonably flexible way



The following mentioned policies were produced in conjunction with the following legislations from the federal level:


· Age Discrimination Act 2004


· Disability Discrimination Act 1992


· Racial Discrimination Act 1975


· Sex Discrimination Act 1984


· Equal Opportunity Act 2010


· Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986


Dans Construction Group provides equal opportunity in employment to people without discrimination based on a personal characteristic protected under state and federal equal opportunity legislation.



Under State legislation they include:



• age



• breastfeeding



• carer status



• disability



• employment activity



• gender identity



• industrial activity



• lawful sexual activity



• marital status



• parental status



• personal association with someone having any of these characteristics



• physical features



• political activity/belief



• pregnancy



• race



• religious activity/belief



• sex



• sexual orientation



At Dans Construction Group, we pledge that to provide, attract and retain individual in a safe, fair, and transparent manner. That no individual will be treated differently or with special privilege, regardless of race, language, faith, sex, social economical background or political beliefs. As individual will be selected based on the principle of meritocracy. Areas such as experiences or academic qualifications will be in consideration in the selection process.


Discrimination, Sexual Harassment and Bullying



At Dans Construction Group, we stand on a zero tolerance policy, as we are committed to provide a workplace environment that’s is free discrimination, sexual harassment and bullying. Should any individual party that perform the act of discrimination, sexual harassment and bullying will result in legal consequences and dismissal.


Discrimination:



Direct discrimination occurs when someone is treated unfavourably because of a personal characteristic that is protected under Victorian law.



Indirect Discrimination occurs when a rule seems neutral, but has a discriminatory impact on certain people. For example, a minimum height requirement of 6 foot for a particular job might be applied equally to men and women, but would indirectly discriminate on the basis of sex, as women tend to be shorter than men.



Sexual harassment includes unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature in circumstances in which it could reasonably be expected to make a person feel offended, humiliated or intimidated a reasonable person, having regard to all the circumstances, would have anticipated that the person harassed would be offended, humiliated or intimidated.



Workplace bullying may include behaviour that is directed toward an employee, or group of employees, that creates a risk to health and safety e.g. physical and/or verbal abuse, excluding or isolating individuals; or giving impossible tasks.



Any employee found to have breech this policy will be subject to disciplinary action or legal consequences, that may result in dismissal.



Should any employees witness or be a be in the position of a potential victim that constitutes sexual harassment, bullying or discrimination, they must report to their managers.



Whistler will not be place in a negative position of any kind and their report will remain anonymous.


Confidentiality



At Dans Construction Group, we as an organisation is committed to abide strict policy with sensitive information for the benefit the clients, stakeholders, suppliers, contractors and the employees.



The aim of this policy is to set a strict ground in relation to resisted and sensitivity information and how to handle them in a professional way.


· Employees are refrain from opening sharing and discussing company information, such as prices, quantities and quotes.


· Employees are refrain from sharing pictures, document or chats in relation to any projects that Dans Construction Group that maybe be involved or undergoing in.


· Employees have to abide strict policy and produces on destroying sensitive information.


· Should any document need to be filed for archive, all relevant documents should be filed in accordant to Commonwealth Privacy Act 1988.




Should any employee be given the access for resisted information, the must acts in a professional way and good will towards the organisations.

The above mention policy was written in relevant to the Commonwealth Privacy Act 1988. Should any individual who breech or failure to follow will result be subjected to disciplinary action or le

Marketing homework help

Capstone Report DRAFT

Maximum length: 3000 words (excluding references and appendices)

Marks: 10%

Objective: To formulate a strategy, based on a comprehensive internal and external analysis, to address the challenge.

Directions:

1. Write the draft of your final report, including as much final content as possible. Some lecture material about evaluating alternatives and implementation will only have been covered recently. We know this. You are encouraged to incorporate, in a holistic manner, the content and more importantly the feedback from the Group Report.

2. Your draft should formulate a strategic plan for the case company to implement in the next 24 months:

· Evaluate the significant internal and external factors

· Clearly state the problem or opportunity your strategy addresses. This must be in relation to the challenge posed by the company.

· Identify and evaluate alternative strategies, then recommend a specific strategy (you may not have fully developed your strategies by Week 7 but you need to show the kinds of alternatives you are considering, based on your analysis, and which seems the more appropriate choice)

3. Refer to the draft rubrics for assessment guide.

4. Include the word count on the cover page of your draft (should not be more than 3000 words, excluding references and appendix). So, include a final list of references cited. Footnotes are the preferred location for in-text references.  10% extra word limit is not allowed. Appendix should be only 3-4 pages; include only the most important

NOTE: Do not simply “cut and paste” your group report into your individual report.  You must edit (delete some sections) and extend your analysis to focus on the issues relevant to the problem you identify and address with your strategy.

IMPORTANT: This assessment is marked to a different rubric than the final report. Thus, a good mark in the draft does not assure the student of a good grade for the final report – it indicates only that the student is on track for the final report 3 weeks away and that 3 more weeks of work is expected for a good grade in the final.

Table  Description automatically generated

Table  Description automatically generated

Table  Description automatically generated

Table  Description automatically generated

Marketing homework help

1

10

Hope Givers: Disabilities Employments

Overall objective

The overall objective of Hope Givers is to develop an efficient application to help employees with disabilities. So, it can be a platform that connects people with disabilities and the companies that provide them with jobs. This can also be useful for managing their issues by developing an effective service that helps people with disabilities who want to enter the job market. Many obvious ways can be helpful to facilitate the work for people in this situation. The important one is to encourage related authorities to support and solve any problems that might exist and pay more attention to the rights, freedoms, and interests of the person with disabilities.

Project work packages and tasks

Figure 1 – Project work packages and tasks

Schedule

This table shows the schedule for project packaging:

Months

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Tasks

Q
1

Q
2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




1 Planning




1.1 initiative


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.1.1 Identifying the job vacancies


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.1.2 Identifying disabled people skills


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2 Requirements


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2.1 Categorizing disabilities


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2.2 Mapping the requirements


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




2 Execution


 

 

 



2.1 Design App layout


 

 

2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.1 Defining an APP strategy


 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.2 Designing wireframe


 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.3 Choose Technology


 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2 App Development


 

 

 

 

 

 

4-5-6-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.1 Developing


 

 

 

 

 

 

4-5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.2 Creating user interface


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.3 Testing


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




3 Promoting




3.1 Content management


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.1 Lunching App


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.2 Adding a bank of disabled People


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.3 Adding a bank of job vacancies


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2 Advertising & selling


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-10

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2.1 Creating Blogs


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2.2 Using social networks


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-10

 

 

 

 

 

 




4 Closure




4.1 Monitoring


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



4.1.1 Evaluating apps, people performance


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



4.2 Training


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11-12-13



4.2.1 Providing career guidance & training


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11-12

 

 

 



4.2.2 Ongoing App engagement & support


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-13



4.2.3 Holding workshops


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key financial figures

Below we present the initial numbers of the Hope Givers project:

Project Budget – Hope Givers

 

 

Initial Expenses

1. Cust with technology to develop the APP

46,000.00

Software architecture

10,000.00

Software programming and development

25,000.00

Hours of testing and updates

5,000.00

Support and maintenance

5,000.00

Hosting and server to keep the APP online

1,000.00

2. Personnel cost

11,700.00

Salary

10,000.00

Benefits

1,000.00

Training and development

500.00

Taxes

200.00

3. Administrative costs

13,800.00

Office rent

2,000.00

Monthly consumption expenses (water, energy, and internet)

700.00

Furniture

3,000.00

Laptops and Computers

7,000.00

Accountant

500.00

Lawyer

300.00

Taxes

300.00

Total Expenses

71,500.00

Revenue expectation

73,000.00

Monthly plan of companies that will advertise their vacancies on our App

30,000.00

Trainings

8,000.00

Digital marketing – Google Ads.

35,000.00


Marketing homework help

Data Source Details (for Final Draft of Your Data Brief)

Use this as an example and type your own text

Data Source Name: Avocado Sales

Total # of records (rows): 18,250

Dimensions you plan to use:

Date, Region, State, City, Product Type

Metrics you plan to use:

Average Price, Total Units, Total Bags



Dashboard

1-sentence summary of what your dashboard will contain:

Sales distribution of Hass avocados across the US

List at least 5 different data elements that will be in your dashboard (charts, tables, etc.)

1. Table: KPI Summary – Volume and sales by region with YoY % differences

2. Chart: Line chart showing avocado sales over time (summarized for US)

3. Chart: line chart showing average price per unit over time (lines for each year)

4. Chart: bar chart showing the % of total avocado sales per region

5. List: Top 5 cities for avocado purchases and the total amount $ spent

6. Chart: column chart showing avocado sales by product description


Analysis Presentation

1-sentence summary of what your analysis will focus on:

Analysis of avocado consumption by region, state, and city to determine differences in demand and pricing.

List the specific questions you will ask/answer with your analysis:

· Compare avocado consumption across regions

· What is the trend over time for price and consumption qty?

· Is there a relationship between price and consumption?

· Do different regions favor specific product types?

Marketing homework help

Contents

Welcome 2
History 3
Service 3
Clients 4
Our mission, vision & values 4
Vision Statement: 4
Values: 4
Business Registration 5
Builders Registration Policy 6
Discrimination, Sexual Harassment and Bullying 16
Record Keeping 18





Policy and Procedure Manual

Welcome

Congratulations on your appointment and welcome to the team at Dans Construction Group! We are excited that you have decided to join us and look forward to a long, happy and successful partnership together. Our business is primarily about building and developing high quality properties in a timely and safe manner, and exceeding our client’s expectation every time.

You have been hired because we believe you can help us to achieve our goals in delivering a high quality product, beyond our customer’s satisfaction. We want to ensure that your interactions with other Dans Construction Group employees and stakeholders will reflect the values that Dans Construction Group places on its staff – by way of teamwork, bottom up management, job satisfaction and our commitment to superior customer service.

The purpose of this Manual is to introduce you to the Dans Construction Group, give you some information about our history, our clients and what we do. You will also find information about your terms and conditions and employment, our expectations around your behaviour and our policies and procedures. This manual should be read in conjunction with your

Contract of Employment.

This Manual is by no means an exhaustive guide to your employment with us. It has been developed to act as a resource and reference for you. The policies within this Manual are easily listed and easily accessed via the contents page. This Manual will be updated as required as our business evolves and grows. You will be notified of any changes as they occur. If you have any questions about the content, please do not hesitate to contact

Gordon MANN – General Manager, on 0418 340 850




History

The story of Dans Construction Group starts in 2000s when Yingning LI and Gordon MANN decided to combine their extensive knowledge and networks within the wall and ceiling lining, telecommunication and the construction industry.

Dans Construction Group is a privately owned boutique construction company specialising in residential and retail buildings. With a combined experience of over 50 years in the industry – both locally and internationally, the company’s leaders have a shared passion for constructing high quality buildings, with a commitment to innovation and creativity for long-term success.

Dans Construction Group aligns itself with only the best advisors, consultants, architects and designers to ensure each project exceeds our customers’ expectations, and cements an ongoing relationship so our purchasers keep coming back and become clients for life.


Service

At Dans Construction Group, and related entities, we provide the following:

· Development and Construction

· Building for Clients

· Provide Telecommunication Solution

· Innovative Building Methods – Wall Partition Systems and Solution


Clients

Our clients vary from homeowners, retirees, house flappers, domestic builders, newlyweds and property agents.


Our mission, vision & values


Mission Statement:

Dans Construction Group’s mission is to develop and construct buildings that stand the test of time through unique design and high-quality standards – for both ourselves and our valued clients.


Vision Statement:


Our aim is to be:

• Known for our highest regard for safety and employee wellbeing.

• Known for producing a quality product, on time and within budget.


Values:

· Safety

· Wellbeing of all

· Respect

· Integrity

· Excellence

· Punctuality


Business Registration

Dans Construction Group is registered using Australian Company Number (ACN) via the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

We are also resighted with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) using Business Registration Service (BRS) with the Australian Government.

Business Registration Checklist

Yes

No

Comment

Has a business name relating to the works been chosen

Have you registered an ABN

Have you registered a TFN

Have you registered GST

Has tax agent number been registered

Have you registered a PAYG

Have required licenses and permits been approved

Has a business website been set up?

Has trade mark been registered?


Builders Registration Policy

Dans Construction Group is registered with the Victorian Building Authority (VBA) in the following classes:

· Domestic Builder (Unlimited)

· Domestic Builder (Limited to sheet plastering)

We are certified in all areas in a domestic project from the beginning to the end. And we are also qualified in plaster wall systems.

We employ licensed building practitioner who are register VBA with the varies backgrounds or skills. Individuals who which to be a part of our team must apply with the document shown below.


Steps that need to be taken.


Step 1:

All applicants will first need to provide evidence of their relevant trade background certificates or experience.


Step 2:

All applicants need to provide relevant trade referee, as evidence that they were involved with that project.
All applicants note that the project that they were involved need to be $16,000 minimum, and provide at least 3 years of relevant experience.


Step 3:

All applicants need to provide with police check when submitting their photo ID.


Step 4:

Pay the relevant application fees and please note that the VBA may ask you for an interview.
In some cases, a writing exam is need to proof your relevant skills and qualifications.

Forms can be found on the VBA webpage.


https://www.vba.vic.gov.au/

All licenses obtain follows strict application requirement from the VBA.






Domestic Builder (Unlimited) Application form


Domestic Builder (Limited to sheet plastering)

Code of Conduct Policy


Purpose

This policy affirms Dans Construction Group belief in responsible social and ethical behaviour from all employees. This policy clarifies the standards of behaviour that Dans Construction Group expects of all employees.


Policy

This policy applies to all employees across Dans Construction Group and provide the backbone of the working with other employee or conducting business activities. Note that this policy act as a secondary backbone in enhancing a safe working environment, and promotes the professionalism within the each and individuals. This policy will not and must not overwrite, in conflict with any current legislation that is current to the time where the policy is written. This Code of Conduct Policy is based on:

· The practices of high level of integrity and the act of professionalism.

· The understanding of responsibility and transparency in relation to sensitive information, funds, facilities and equipment.

· The important of respect regards of class, faith or background.

· The practise of act of promoting the interest of the organisation.

· The practise of equal opportunities and fairness when dealing with business activity.

· Carry out responsibility with professionalism, integrity and care.

· Follows the direction of the policies and procedures and avoid any unlawful or law breaking practise in relation with the clients, subcontractors, suppliers and the organisation.

· Avoid any activities that maybe be corrupt, such as accepting gift or exchanging favours.

· Under any given condition should an employee accept any finical favours.

· Whistling, raising concern or reporting a suspicious activity, in accordance with following the correct policy and produce will not be put or place in any disadvantage position. All reported incident should be dealt with and all records will be kept and protect the identity of whistlers.

Any employee who breach the policy may result in disciplinary action or termination.

Dans Construction Group expect all employee should practise highest level of professionalism, integrity and responsivity.

Should an employee have doubts about any aspect of the Code of Conduct, they must seek clarification from Gordon Mann, General Manager.

This policy will be update and reviewed by Dans Construction Group, and any necessary changes will be updated in accordance to the legislation in the time of this policy is written.



Dress Code Policy




Dans Construction Group main focus is set a standard for workplace dress code that is safe and comfortable. This create a professional image which enable us to create credibility with the clients, customer and the supplier. At Dans Construction Group, a standard uniform will be provided for every employee.



Office Employee




For office employees are required to dress business causal for work hours, a black polo shirt with the company’s branding will be providing for all office employees. For bottoms, employees may choose to wear jeans, Skirts or black office pants. When on site, office employees are required to put on black hard hat with the company branding, company branded hi-vi vest and a pair of steel cap boots.



Warehouse Employee/Delivery Drivers




For warehouse employee are required to put on Personal Protection Equipment throughout the course of the shift. A yellow hard hat with the company branding will be provide together with a company branded hi-vi vest. For delivery drivers, a blue hard hat with the company branding will be provided. Employee must wear cargo pants or workpants together with steel cap boots throughout their shift. For delivery drivers, they must wear work pants with reflective strips on.



On-Site Employee




For on-site employee are required to put on Personal Protection Equipment throughout the course of the shift. A white hard hat with the company branding will be provide together with a company branded hi-vi vest. For foramens and supervisor, a red hard hats with the company branding will be provided. Employee must wear cargo pants or workpants together with steel cap boots throughout their shift.




Supply and Purchasing




The commencement of the employment of a new employee, a set of uniform will be provided by the company. Should an employee need to place in order for a new uniform, hardhats or hi-vi vest, additional cost will be send as an invoice. Order needed to be placed for new uniforms, hence employees will dress as per instruction from management until a uniform is distributed. New uniforms will be given to employees when under the management’s discrete. When an employee chose to leave the company, he/she will be required to give back the uniforms.




Maintenance




All uniforms worn, including hard hats should be clean, neatly and within the warranty pressed at all times.


Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)



Policy



This policy applies to all employee across Dans Construction Group, including contractors and overarch all business activities both internally and externally by Dans Construction Group. This policy also covers work related training sponsored by Dans Construction Group.



This policy will be used in all promotion, recruitment and selection decisions.



The aim of the Equal Opportunity Policy is to maximums the business potential by:



•attracting and retaining the best possible employees



• providing a workplace that is safe, respectful and flexible for all individual across the company



• delivering our services in a safe, respectful and reasonably flexible way



The following mentioned policies were produced in conjunction with the following legislations from the federal level:


· Age Discrimination Act 2004


· Disability Discrimination Act 1992


· Racial Discrimination Act 1975


· Sex Discrimination Act 1984


· Equal Opportunity Act 2010


· Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986


Dans Construction Group provides equal opportunity in employment to people without discrimination based on a personal characteristic protected under state and federal equal opportunity legislation.



Under State legislation they include:



• age



• breastfeeding



• carer status



• disability



• employment activity



• gender identity



• industrial activity



• lawful sexual activity



• marital status



• parental status



• personal association with someone having any of these characteristics



• physical features



• political activity/belief



• pregnancy



• race



• religious activity/belief



• sex



• sexual orientation



At Dans Construction Group, we pledge that to provide, attract and retain individual in a safe, fair, and transparent manner. That no individual will be treated differently or with special privilege, regardless of race, language, faith, sex, social economical background or political beliefs. As individual will be selected based on the principle of meritocracy. Areas such as experiences or academic qualifications will be in consideration in the selection process.


Discrimination, Sexual Harassment and Bullying



At Dans Construction Group, we stand on a zero tolerance policy, as we are committed to provide a workplace environment that’s is free discrimination, sexual harassment and bullying. Should any individual party that perform the act of discrimination, sexual harassment and bullying will result in legal consequences and dismissal.


Discrimination:



Direct discrimination occurs when someone is treated unfavourably because of a personal characteristic that is protected under Victorian law.



Indirect Discrimination occurs when a rule seems neutral, but has a discriminatory impact on certain people. For example, a minimum height requirement of 6 foot for a particular job might be applied equally to men and women, but would indirectly discriminate on the basis of sex, as women tend to be shorter than men.



Sexual harassment includes unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature in circumstances in which it could reasonably be expected to make a person feel offended, humiliated or intimidated a reasonable person, having regard to all the circumstances, would have anticipated that the person harassed would be offended, humiliated or intimidated.



Workplace bullying may include behaviour that is directed toward an employee, or group of employees, that creates a risk to health and safety e.g. physical and/or verbal abuse, excluding or isolating individuals; or giving impossible tasks.



Any employee found to have breech this policy will be subject to disciplinary action or legal consequences, that may result in dismissal.



Should any employees witness or be a be in the position of a potential victim that constitutes sexual harassment, bullying or discrimination, they must report to their managers.



Whistler will not be place in a negative position of any kind and their report will remain anonymous.


Confidentiality



At Dans Construction Group, we as an organisation is committed to abide strict policy with sensitive information for the benefit the clients, stakeholders, suppliers, contractors and the employees.



The aim of this policy is to set a strict ground in relation to resisted and sensitivity information and how to handle them in a professional way.


· Employees are refrain from opening sharing and discussing company information, such as prices, quantities and quotes.


· Employees are refrain from sharing pictures, document or chats in relation to any projects that Dans Construction Group that maybe be involved or undergoing in.


· Employees have to abide strict policy and produces on destroying sensitive information.


· Should any document need to be filed for archive, all relevant documents should be filed in accordant to Commonwealth Privacy Act 1988.




Should any employee be given the access for resisted information, the must acts in a professional way and good will towards the organisations.

The above mention policy was written in relevant to the Commonwealth Privacy Act 1988. Should any individual who breech or failure to follow will result be subjected to disciplinary action or le

Marketing homework help

1

10

Hope Givers: Disabilities Employments

Overall objective

The overall objective of Hope Givers is to develop an efficient application to help employees with disabilities. So, it can be a platform that connects people with disabilities and the companies that provide them with jobs. This can also be useful for managing their issues by developing an effective service that helps people with disabilities who want to enter the job market. Many obvious ways can be helpful to facilitate the work for people in this situation. The important one is to encourage related authorities to support and solve any problems that might exist and pay more attention to the rights, freedoms, and interests of the person with disabilities.

Project work packages and tasks

Figure 1 – Project work packages and tasks

Schedule

This table shows the schedule for project packaging:

Months

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Tasks

Q
1

Q
2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




1 Planning




1.1 initiative


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.1.1 Identifying the job vacancies


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.1.2 Identifying disabled people skills


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2 Requirements


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2.1 Categorizing disabilities


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1.2.2 Mapping the requirements


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




2 Execution


 

 

 



2.1 Design App layout


 

 

2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.1 Defining an APP strategy


 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.2 Designing wireframe


 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.1.3 Choose Technology


 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2 App Development


 

 

 

 

 

 

4-5-6-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.1 Developing


 

 

 

 

 

 

4-5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.2 Creating user interface


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2.2.3 Testing


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




3 Promoting




3.1 Content management


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.1 Lunching App


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.2 Adding a bank of disabled People


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.1.3 Adding a bank of job vacancies


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2 Advertising & selling


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-10

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2.1 Creating Blogs


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



3.2.2 Using social networks


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-10

 

 

 

 

 

 




4 Closure




4.1 Monitoring


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



4.1.1 Evaluating apps, people performance


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



4.2 Training


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11-12-13



4.2.1 Providing career guidance & training


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11-12

 

 

 



4.2.2 Ongoing App engagement & support


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-13



4.2.3 Holding workshops


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key financial figures

Below we present the initial numbers of the Hope Givers project:

Project Budget – Hope Givers

 

 

Initial Expenses

1. Cust with technology to develop the APP

46,000.00

Software architecture

10,000.00

Software programming and development

25,000.00

Hours of testing and updates

5,000.00

Support and maintenance

5,000.00

Hosting and server to keep the APP online

1,000.00

2. Personnel cost

11,700.00

Salary

10,000.00

Benefits

1,000.00

Training and development

500.00

Taxes

200.00

3. Administrative costs

13,800.00

Office rent

2,000.00

Monthly consumption expenses (water, energy, and internet)

700.00

Furniture

3,000.00

Laptops and Computers

7,000.00

Accountant

500.00

Lawyer

300.00

Taxes

300.00

Total Expenses

71,500.00

Revenue expectation

73,000.00

Monthly plan of companies that will advertise their vacancies on our App

30,000.00

Trainings

8,000.00

Digital marketing – Google Ads.

35,000.00


Marketing homework help

1



Data Brief Sample

Final Draft of Data Brief and Data Source Details

What is your project’s context?

My origin curiosity was more of a stakeholder intrigue. I am providing this data for my professors so this is not borne of my curiosity through personal intrigue, I was tasked with this by specific curiosity from my professors, but I did have freedom to choose a data source, but I couldn’t find a good one, so I am using one provided by my professors.

For my project circumstances, all factors/metrics seem to be relevant but, since having a focus is better, based on my target output which is, based on the world happiness data, do my factors affect the happiness on each country. So, with that in mind I decided to focus on, Healthy Life Expectancy at Birth, Life Ladder, Freedom to Make life Choices. Log GDP per capital.

I would say that my stakeholders are my professors this is due to them being the ones who assigned me with this task. They are the ultimate decision makers in whether my data visual is proper and effective and whether I get the grade or not. I am going to assume that my audience does not have any effect on my data, and they also have no prior information of it.

My constraints are that I have to deliver my data visual by December 11th, 2021. This gives me a time limit as a constraint. I also am doing this as academic research project so another constraint could be as a competition with my other peers, so this can be like, “Is my graph creating a more impactful point, is it easiest to understand etc.”

In terms of consumption this is more of a one-off thing where I won’t have to produce charts monthly or annually. however, points of discussion could be raised on automating certain points of my final graph so that it can automatically be renewed annually and be reused. Otherwise, I have a deadline for this assignment and will not be producing any more or updating it.

For my Deliverables: I am going to have to revise my dashboard and analysis presentation based on the feedback received. My analysis presentation needs to include at least one calculation that helps tell my story or give context to my story.

For my resources, since this is not a collaborated project, I do not have any other people whom the work will be distributed amongst to allocate or explain who will be doing what. Rather I am doing this alone so in terms of what I can and can’t do I haven’t found any constraints in my abilities as of yet. In terms of technology, I am using Tableau, and this is helping me because I am able to put in thousands of records of data and it is able to effectively give me sums and produce whatever calculations I need.

Audience

I would say that my audience are my professors and my peers, so the details I would have on my audience are that in terms of my professors they are the ones issuing my deliverables and what I need to specifically have done by the deadline. In terms of my peers, I would say that the only details I have is that they will be reviewing my final deliverables and providing feedback on which I must change or improve my work. I don’t have any other details about my audience.

I think that my audience impacts my work as a data visualization designer because I will have to make it in a way that is easy to read and comprehend and make sure to use the right colors and visuals. Using wrong or confusing colors can lead to confusion and it will be hard to understand what I am presenting, which also leads to my point about not adding too many factors to my data visualization because that will just be overkill and I won’t be able to properly make a graph that conveys my story and what I am aiming to gain or have my audience gain from reading my graph. Also, in terms of impacting, if my audience does not get the message that I am trying to portray through my data visualization then it could lead to negative feedback from my peers and bad grades from my professors.

In terms of how my audience impacts my work as an analysis presenter, since I am not presenting it in-person or virtually, I don’t have to weigh in factors such as formal dressing, Attitude, my background (in virtual meeting), and how my speech. I will also have to find the most effective way to present it. However even without these things, I will need to make sure my presentation is well formatted and has necessary and engaging information. It should have the appropriate details and arguments or calculations to validate my story, with these things in mind my audience can give feedback or grades based on how they saw my presentation and whether it was easy to read and understand through that they can impact my final deliverable and it will weigh what final grade I also receive.

Data Set

For my Data set, since I have many metrics to work with I will be using the 4 which I specified in my project circumstances these are the relevant data set information’s that I will need to formulate my final deliverables so by limiting my data to these points I am able to focus on those aspects to then make an argument or present my story through a presentation and a data visualization.

Constraints

I encountered issues when getting my data sources in the beginning because I had intended on a different source, but I came to see that it didn’t have enough metrics and I also had the same issue with my second data source, however I was able to get a source that has enough metrics as well as enough rows of data per metric. I also had a few issues opening it in Tableau and setting it up but once I spent time on it, I was able to get my data to be inserted into tableau. Other than that, I didn’t encounter any other issues while working with my data source.

Visuals


Diagram  Description automatically generated


A white paper with writing on it  Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Data Source Name: World Happiness

Total # of records (rows): 1949

Dimensions you plan to use: Country name

Metrics you plan to use:

Healthy Life Expectancy at birth, Life Ladder, Freedom to make life choices, Log GDP per capital


Dashboard

World happiness

1. Chart: Line chart showing world Happiest Country

2. Chart: Line chart showing Healthy Life Expectancy at Birth

3. Chart: Line chart showing freedom to Make Life Choice vs Generosity from 2010 to 2020

4. Chart: Line chart showing world Happiness vs GDP and Healthy Life Expectancy

5. Chart: Line chart showing world countries with positive and negative effect between 2017 and 2020


Analysis Presentation

1-sentence summary of what your analysis will focus on:

Analysis of based on the world happiness data, do my metrics affect the happiness on each country.

List the specific questions you will ask/answer with your analysis:

· Compare Healthy life expectancy at birth over different countries

· What is the trend over time for GDP per capital in each country?

· Is there a relationship between Freedom to make life choices and Life ladder?

· Do different countries have major differences in log GDP per capital?

Marketing homework help

1



Data Brief Sample

Final Draft of Data Brief and Data Source Details

What is your project’s context?

My origin curiosity was more of a stakeholder intrigue. I am providing this data for my professors so this is not borne of my curiosity through personal intrigue, I was tasked with this by specific curiosity from my professors, but I did have freedom to choose a data source, but I couldn’t find a good one, so I am using one provided by my professors.

For my project circumstances, all factors/metrics seem to be relevant but, since having a focus is better, based on my target output which is, based on the world happiness data, do my factors affect the happiness on each country. So, with that in mind I decided to focus on, Healthy Life Expectancy at Birth, Life Ladder, Freedom to Make life Choices. Log GDP per capital.

I would say that my stakeholders are my professors this is due to them being the ones who assigned me with this task. They are the ultimate decision makers in whether my data visual is proper and effective and whether I get the grade or not. I am going to assume that my audience does not have any effect on my data, and they also have no prior information of it.

My constraints are that I have to deliver my data visual by December 11th, 2021. This gives me a time limit as a constraint. I also am doing this as academic research project so another constraint could be as a competition with my other peers, so this can be like, “Is my graph creating a more impactful point, is it easiest to understand etc.”

In terms of consumption this is more of a one-off thing where I won’t have to produce charts monthly or annually. however, points of discussion could be raised on automating certain points of my final graph so that it can automatically be renewed annually and be reused. Otherwise, I have a deadline for this assignment and will not be producing any more or updating it.

For my Deliverables: I am going to have to revise my dashboard and analysis presentation based on the feedback received. My analysis presentation needs to include at least one calculation that helps tell my story or give context to my story.

For my resources, since this is not a collaborated project, I do not have any other people whom the work will be distributed amongst to allocate or explain who will be doing what. Rather I am doing this alone so in terms of what I can and can’t do I haven’t found any constraints in my abilities as of yet. In terms of technology, I am using Tableau, and this is helping me because I am able to put in thousands of records of data and it is able to effectively give me sums and produce whatever calculations I need.

Audience

I would say that my audience are my professors and my peers, so the details I would have on my audience are that in terms of my professors they are the ones issuing my deliverables and what I need to specifically have done by the deadline. In terms of my peers, I would say that the only details I have is that they will be reviewing my final deliverables and providing feedback on which I must change or improve my work. I don’t have any other details about my audience.

I think that my audience impacts my work as a data visualization designer because I will have to make it in a way that is easy to read and comprehend and make sure to use the right colors and visuals. Using wrong or confusing colors can lead to confusion and it will be hard to understand what I am presenting, which also leads to my point about not adding too many factors to my data visualization because that will just be overkill and I won’t be able to properly make a graph that conveys my story and what I am aiming to gain or have my audience gain from reading my graph. Also, in terms of impacting, if my audience does not get the message that I am trying to portray through my data visualization then it could lead to negative feedback from my peers and bad grades from my professors.

In terms of how my audience impacts my work as an analysis presenter, since I am not presenting it in-person or virtually, I don’t have to weigh in factors such as formal dressing, Attitude, my background (in virtual meeting), and how my speech. I will also have to find the most effective way to present it. However even without these things, I will need to make sure my presentation is well formatted and has necessary and engaging information. It should have the appropriate details and arguments or calculations to validate my story, with these things in mind my audience can give feedback or grades based on how they saw my presentation and whether it was easy to read and understand through that they can impact my final deliverable and it will weigh what final grade I also receive.

Data Set

For my Data set, since I have many metrics to work with I will be using the 4 which I specified in my project circumstances these are the relevant data set information’s that I will need to formulate my final deliverables so by limiting my data to these points I am able to focus on those aspects to then make an argument or present my story through a presentation and a data visualization.

Constraints

I encountered issues when getting my data sources in the beginning because I had intended on a different source, but I came to see that it didn’t have enough metrics and I also had the same issue with my second data source, however I was able to get a source that has enough metrics as well as enough rows of data per metric. I also had a few issues opening it in Tableau and setting it up but once I spent time on it, I was able to get my data to be inserted into tableau. Other than that, I didn’t encounter any other issues while working with my data source.

Visuals


Diagram  Description automatically generated


A white paper with writing on it  Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Data Source Name: World Happiness

Total # of records (rows): 1949

Dimensions you plan to use: Country name

Metrics you plan to use:

Healthy Life Expectancy at birth, Life Ladder, Freedom to make life choices, Log GDP per capital


Dashboard

World happiness

1. Chart: Line chart showing world Happiest Country

2. Chart: Line chart showing Healthy Life Expectancy at Birth

3. Chart: Line chart showing freedom to Make Life Choice vs Generosity from 2010 to 2020

4. Chart: Line chart showing world Happiness vs GDP and Healthy Life Expectancy

5. Chart: Line chart showing world countries with positive and negative effect between 2017 and 2020


Analysis Presentation

1-sentence summary of what your analysis will focus on:

Analysis of based on the world happiness data, do my metrics affect the happiness on each country.

List the specific questions you will ask/answer with your analysis:

· Compare Healthy life expectancy at birth over different countries

· What is the trend over time for GDP per capital in each country?

· Is there a relationship between Freedom to make life choices and Life ladder?

· Do different countries have major differences in log GDP per capital?

Marketing homework help

Capstone Report FINAL

Maximum length: 4000 words (excluding references and appendices)

Marks: 50%

Objective: To demonstrate key learning and skills developed throughout the course by creating a written report addressed to the executives of the company partner on a viable strategy, supported by utilization of appropriate frameworks and in-depth research, to effectively address the business challenge presented at the beginning of the quarter.

Directions:

1. Develop a strategic plan for the case company to implement in the next 24 months that meets the challenge, in the form of a written report for the management team. Consistent with the final project rubrics, your report must include at least the following components:

1. Executive summary;

2. Internal analysis;

3. External analysis;

4. Problem definition;

5. Strategy development (including alternatives to your final recommendation);

6. Strategy evaluation and choice; and,

7. Strategy implementation.

2. You are encouraged to incorporate, in a holistic manner, the content and more importantly the feedback from Draft #1 and the Group Report.

Important: For Draft 1 and Final Report as well as Group Report:

3 Adopt a company-report style (vs. academic-report style). Incorporate figures and tables within the body of the document, along with the source of information in the graphic/table. Provide a list of references. You may add appendices for supporting materials not critical to the main report.

4 References and appendices are not included in the word limit. Footnotes are the preferred location for in-text references. Include a final list of references cited.

5 Utilizing the Business Communications Team’s draft points before the final submission is highly recommended. 

Table  Description automatically generated

Table  Description automatically generated

A picture containing text, newspaper, screenshot  Description automatically generated

A picture containing table  Description automatically generated

Text  Description automatically generated with low confidence

A picture containing table  Description automatically generated

A picture containing text  Description automatically generated

Marketing homework help

4page paper, you need write 4 page

For this assignment, you only need to state which case (Coke, Pepsi, or McDonald’s) you will study for your second analysis project.  Additionally, provide an working draft outline of how you will construct your report.  You will refer back to this outline for your Project Status Reports, which will be due in Weeks 6 and 7 of the course.

 

CASE ANALYSIS 2 INSTRUCTIONS

After you have read the case study prepare a typed report (see the sample report provided in class), in APA format, which presents the following points.

1. In an introductory passage, give a brief case summary and introduce the major problem/issue presented in the case. Full problem details will be presented later in your report.

2. Identify the Mission and goals of the organization (stated or implied). If these are not stated in the case, create a Mission Statement and goals of your own that could possibly be used by the company.

3. Problem identification/discussion – identify the major problem(s)/challenge(s)/issue(s) facing the organization in the case study. Identify the root cause(s) of the problem/challenge/issue.

4. Conduct a SWOT Analysis, given the organization’s situation presented in the case study.

5. Evaluate the organization’s implementation of their marketing plan for EACH of the four elements of the marketing mix.

     a. product/services

     b. pricing strategies

     c. distribution channels

     d. promotional mix

5. Present your recommended solutions for how the organization should proceed, based upon your analysis.

 

GRADE RUBRIC: TOTAL POINTS = 100 PTS

Introduction – case summary and problem introduction = 5pts

Mission Statement/goals discussed = 5 pts

Problem Identified/causes discussed = 10 pts

SWOT Analysis = 15 pts

Analysis/Evaluation of:

     a. product/services = 10 pts

     b. pricing strategies = 10 pts

     c. distribution channels = 10 pts

     d. promotional mix = 10 pts

Recommendations = 10 pts

Report APA formatting/Composition = 15 pts

Marketing homework help

Image

Priority 1

Target Market and Demographics: African-American, Low income

Department/Program/Service: hypertension

Marketing Technique: YouTube, Billboard, newspaper

Discussion:

I decided this target market and demographic to be the first priority as disease and disability are frequent in this community, high death rates, and a reduction in life expectancies because of hypertension. The Services about hypertension for Missouri is critical to this demographic as it is the leading cause of death in Missouri. According to Spencer, (2019). Hypertension is a serious issue in Missouri as it is a “silent killer.

The strategies for marketing align with the purpose, vision, and values of the organization since it is accountable and honesty for the information shown on marketing tools, that is YouTube and the newspapers, and billboards (Berkowitz, 2021). It ensures that we can reach the old African-American population in communities which is our primary goal. It helps to promote and identify the implication of the state-funded funds hence promote diversity hence allow the enormous amount of information supporting in fighting the healthcare crisis.

 Priority 2

 

Target Market and Demographics: Hispanic, low-income

 

Department/Program/Service: Rural-areas Health

 

Marketing Technique: Facebook, Television advertisements and word of mouth

Discussion:

I have chosen this specific market and demographic to take the second priority since the diseases and disability are rampant in the Hispanic community. The market includes geographic isolated, lower-socioeconomic status, increased risks in health and limited career opportunities. Also, an increased percentage of chronic disease and reduced general well-being in rural groups.

The Rural-area Health Program for Missouri is important to this specific group as is takes care of the requirements of Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) patients in rural-areas. The program therefore supports and stabilizes out-patient primary care in under-served rural areas by providing doctors, and other medical physicians.

The marketing plans align with the program’s purpose vision, and values as it ensures the commercials adhere to moral ethics. The primary goal is to ensure that we get to the patients and also potential patients in rural-areas and help in promoting and partnering with other organizations. According to Berkowitz (2021), Facebook and TV commercials allow response and timely communication to be reliable.

Priority 3

 Target market and demographic: White-low-income

 

Department/Program: Oral-Health

 

Marketing technique: radio, pamphlets and Twitter

Discussion:

There is a little support in socioeconomic, illness, and decrease in welfare and all-purpose health in the White-low-income community. The market includes a population in geographic isolated, low socioeconomic status, and a demographical area with a poor access to education. The Oral-health program provides preventive care as well as educates Missourians on brushing and making better healthy food choices (Syed et al., 2021).

The Oral-Health services aims in making available important information in these areas for this market. The programs avail the centers with low-cost dental and medical care services. The Missouri oral health programs provide education to individuals on various issues on dental hygiene, water fluoridation, and support for individuals with developing disabilities of all ages.

The advertising tools such as, pamphlets, radios and Twitter align with the purpose, vision, and values. They observe to the ethical rules and follow the highest standards and requirements (Berkowitz, 2021). The promotion strategies do not compromise the truthfulness of this organization.

References

Berkowitz, E. N. (2021). Essentials of health care marketing. Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Kerins, J. L., Koske, S. E., Kazmierczak, J., Austin, C., Gowdy, K., Dibernardo, A., … & Seoul Virus Working Group. (2018). Outbreak of Seoul virus among rats and rat owners—United States and Canada, 2017. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report67(4), 131.

Spencer, E. (2019). Management and support of uninsured patients with diabetes type II within a nurse managed clinic.

Syed, M., Ahmed, F., Zahid, N., Khalid, N., & Israr, N. (2021). Essentials of Healthcare Marketing. Asian Journal of Medicine and Health, 73-79.

Marketing homework help

2

WK7 Pepsi Company Financial Data Plan

Trae Clavo

Doctor of Business, University of Trevecca

Cur Topics/ Business Strategy (BUS-8020-O06.2)

Dr. Rick Mann

April 29, 2022

WK7 Pepsi Company Financial Data Plan

Several factors influence the mode of running Pepsi’s food and beverage firm. They entail the customer’s satisfaction, the locality, the management of the store’s operations, the ability to plan for the capacity, the arrangement of the inventory, and forecasting. Secondary information from various publications shows the presence of both environments, such as the internal and the external. Most of the operations of the organizations revolve between the two settings. Where the affecting factors are named above, it is critical to analyze how and why the documented factors entail the success of the organization’s performance. A firm’s data is ubiquitous due to the availability of various sources of data collection; thus, a great system of data management is needed to organize and consolidate it to the users and give a clue of the firms’ behavior. A great merge between the business manager and the firms IT is critical for more effortless execution of the systems. The IT coordination should be of a good understanding of the information standards and should be in a way managers can easily interpret for implementation (Xiao & O’Neill, 2018). The IT organization should be able to design and match the firm’s desires. Business managers of Pepsi company should address concerns regarding the given business system so that a piece of certain information should be gathered, organized, and spread within the firm. Quality of the information and handling any technicalities concerns by the business managers are critical. The paper explains the financial data plan for the Pepsi organization.

Financial analysis and design are the most critical dealings in a finance department—they aid in achieving the essential goals and objectives of the firm with a budget of the available resources. The most crucial role of the planning is to enable sound management and implementation of both long- and short-term goals to ensure the firm’s targets and profitability are met as stipulated. Financial planning entails the part of the prediction, assigning for finances, communication, and analysis (Gomaa et al., 2018). The following aspects are contained in the financial plan:

1. Forecasting: The primary step of financial planning management entails formulating future sales plans and rating the financial needs to bring the project into action. Pepsi needs to research the present and the future internal businesses picture and expand on the external environments which affect the business. Prediction tools like the Hyperion tool used for planning its critical for achieving the duty. The tools aid in accessing the data that has happened in the previous financial years as well as segregate different elements of the cost function for future forecasting

2. Budgeting: For the excellent management of the stipulated goals. After getting the information about the previous happenings, the company can appraise the wave of the costs incurred and bring better monitoring every month. This will enable the financial need of the firm in a given financial year. The Hyperion tool brings a particular picture of the economic market for a given year.

3. Reporting: After every month. Reporting of the finances can be carried out to give specific information to carry out the organization’s decisions for a given prion of time. Financial information is helpful to both internal and external users. The internal users entail the shareholders and the management of the firm. External users include the investors as well as the financial institutions. The financial information mart system gathers data from various accounting modules to establish monthly financial data.

4. Analysis: an analysis of the financial data. When there is a presence of the overspending picture, we must explore the root of the overspending and the factors involved (Ma, 2021, May). More analysis needs to be carried out to determine whether the elements of overspending can be minimized or not. Analysis of the finances requires excellent knowledge about long-term development and profitability (Langellier & Park, 2020). Financial proportions symbolize a tremendous economic role in the economic analysis of the significant performance of the firm in comparison with the other firms in the same area of operation. Programs have guidebooks for the present proportions, cash flows, and production expenses. Financial analysis surrounds the chief financial officers; thus, it is critical to develop a system that upholds the attention of executive decisions.

Projected Financial Plan for Pepsi Organization

2020

2021

2022

Revenue

$121,494

$180,000

$280,000

Direct Costs

$3,645

$5,400

$8,400

Gross Margin

$117,849

$174,600

$271,600

Gross Margin %

97%

97%

97%

Operating Expenses

Salaries & Wages

$76,800

$78,336

$79,902

Employee Related Expenses

$15,360

$15,667

$15,981

Sales and Marketing

$1,200

$1,200

$1,200

Insurance

$1,800

$1,800

$1,800

Rent

$18,000

$18,000

$18,000

Startup Expenses

$900

Total Operating Expenses

$114,060

$115,003

$116,883

Operating Income

$3,789

$59,597

$154,718

Interest Incurred

Depreciation and Amortization

$456

$456

$456

Gain or Loss from Sale of Assets

Income Taxes

$833

$14,785

$38,566

Total Expenses

$118,994

$135,644

$164,304

Net Profit

$2,500

$44,356

$115,696

Net Profit/Sales

2%

25%

41%

Projected Profit & Loss

The financial system entails the most critical item that a business requires. It is a path, guidance, and a resemblance of the company’s objectives, what the firm intends to acquire in the long or short run. It displays the expected costs and aims to bring to attention the sources and how to approach these costs. A firm’s data is ubiquitous due to the availability of various sources of data collection; thus, a great system of data management is needed to organize and consolidate it to the users and give a clue of the firms’ behavior (Ali, 2020). A great merge between the business manager and the firms IT is critical for more effortless execution of the systems. The IT coordination should be of a good understanding of the information standards and should be in a way managers can easily interpret for implementation. The IT organization should be able to design and match the firm’s desires. Business managers of a given firm should address concerns regarding the given business system so that a piece of certain information should be gathered, organized, and spread within Pepsi company. Quality of the data and handling any technicalities concerns by the business managers are critical.

References

Ali, M. R. (2020). Prediction Accuracy of Financial Data-Applying Several Resampling Techniques.

Gomaa, M. I., Markelevich, A., & Shaw, L. (2018). Introducing XBRL through a financial statement analysis project. Journal of Accounting Education29(2-3), 153-173.

Langellier, B. A., & Park, S. (2020). Financial performance of Medicare Advantage contracts in 2014 and plan renewal, consolidation, and termination rates in the subsequent year. Medical Care58(8), 674-680.

Ma, R. (2021, May). Design and Implementation of Financial Information System for Mobile Devices. In Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Vol. 1915, No. 4, p. 042010). IOP Publishing.

Wahlen, J. M., Baginski, S. P., & Bradshaw, M. (2017). Financial reporting, financial statement analysis, and valuation. Cengage learning.

Xiao, J. J., & O’Neill, B. (2018). Propensity to plan, financial capability, and financial satisfaction. International Journal of Consumer Studies42(5), 501-512.

(WC:1179)

Grammarly 99

Marketing homework help

Course structure

716

Identifying

problems

Analysing

customers

Analysing

context

Analysing

distribution

Analysing

resources

Strategy

develop

ment

Strategy

evaluation

Implement

ation

Introduc

tion

Today

Learning objectives

1.

Reviewing

strategic alternatives

2.

Identify techniques for evaluating

which strategies

are likely to work best

3.

Understand the reasons

for making a conscious

decision about strategy

5

Strategy Evaluation

Very important part of your report

please check the

rubric.

Before you evaluate a strategy, check if you have

described and defined it well?

Are both strategic alternatives directly addressing the

problem identified?

Quick recap

One problem

alternative solutions

Problem effect

Problem 1

Alternative 1

Alternative 2

Alternative 3

Address the problem that causes

most problem

Come up with


competing


alternatives

to address problem

One problem and strategies

W

hich

problem first?

Prioritise and select

Opportunity for your specialisation knowledge

Problem

strategy link?

Only a clear set of strategy alternatives can be

evaluated

using a set of criteria.

Strategy

versus

Tactics

A strategy

helps a firm to achieve its

goals

in a way that is consistent

with the firm’s vision and mission

deliver a unique (mix of) value.

Tactics are relatively smaller and

specific steps to achieve that

strategic goal

; they can occur in

different departments (with shorter

time frames), best practices, etc

.

So,

tactics form the core components of

a

strategy.

E.g., Differentiation Strategy Vs Tactics

Strategy: Assume a company wants to implement product differentiation strategy

Tactics: There could be many supporting tactics – (i) product ingredients, (ii) functionalities, (iii) product design, (iv) packaging, (iii) customer support, and (iv) sales strategies etc.

Note:
Tactics could vary to achieve the main strategic goal of product differentiation.

Strategy description: Your description of strategic alternatives should cover both.

716 strategies types – broad categories

Promotion/Branding – promotion, advertisements, engagement, social media networks or collaborate with partners

Distribution – identifying channels, distributors – large retailers versus boutique, direct – online retailers or collaborate with partners

Product/value proposition – refining position, highlighting uniqueness, finding a niche in competition, aligning with the target market

These are just ideas – you will have to justify how they are relevant

Problem: “Get to Wellington”

Auckland

Wellington

Budget (financial resources)

Urgency (time resource)

Weight of luggage (other resources)

Other decision constraints

Tradeoffs

between alternatives:

Trade

offs between alternative strategies

STRATEGY

ADVANTAGE

DISADVANTAGE

Plane

Fast (3 hrs, incl. boarding)

Safe

Regular

schedule

Expensive

Limited luggage

Car

Take passengers at no extra cost

Carry up to 500kg

Transport in Wellington

Takes 9

hrs to drive

10

Tiring to drive

Dangerous

Train

See the countryside

Comfortable

Takes 12 hrs to get there

Moderate price

Bus

Low cost

See the countryside

Takes 12 hrs to get there

Uncomfortable

Cycle

Low cost

See the countryside

Adventure

Very

s

low (1 week?)

Dangerous

Tiring

, w

et & cold

Back to the problem

· You need a clear, one-sentence problem statement so you can check which strategy “solution” best solves it (but you need to give reasons justify it) [a couple of sentence is also fine – think of how to expand later]

· If your strategy does not solve the problem, you need a different strategy (or to modify your problem; then check the environment analysis)

Alignment between problem and strategy is a must

Problem Strategy Strategy definition formulation evaluation

Problem from environment analysis

Strategies that are clear can be evaluated objectively

Evaluation criteria

1.

Environmental consistency

:

makes sense in relation

to

context

and

external analysis

and expected

changes

2.

Consistent with available resources

:

VRIO

analysis;

aligned with

core competencies

and

capabilities

Evaluation criteria

continued

3.

Acceptable

degree of risk

:

ongoing value of resources;

investment length; size of commitment

a)

Internal

linked risks (preventable, if possible)

b)

External

linked risks (events outside firm’s control)

c)

Strategy risks

(

in order to generate high returns

)

Evaluation criteria

continued

4.

Appropriate

time (planning) horizon

Two years for the case

company

Evaluation criteria

continued

5.

Workable: practical

implementation;

performance

metrics

6

. Financial analysis of ‘

alternatives

FIRST: Need some sense of market / segment size and

growth

(

$$$s

)

Need some sense of

implementation costs

Present financial evidence

show sales revenue and costs

for two years

income statement

(

estimates only

)

Indicate one or more of the following

Return on investment (ROI)

Net present value (NPV) analysis

Breakeven analysis

Years to pay back investment (Payback period)

Estimating sales revenue and costs

Selling 1000 units of shampoo for US$20 = US$20,000

Is

it

per

month

or

year? (20,000 X 12 = US$240,000)

What is cost of sales?

How

many

revenue

streams?

Estimating sales revenue and costs

Month

wise figures can capture both growth, promotions and seasonal impacts

Estimating sales revenue

determinants

Sales

revenue:

Size of

the

target market

Price

that

you

would

recommend

Distribution channel that you would use

Margins

that

you

need

to

pay

to

the

channel

s

Area

whole

country

or one/two states

Any

other?

Cost of goods

sold:

Depends on how much you sell (the more you sell, more

the

cost)

Payment to advertising or partners

Promotion strategy/types

What are the fixed costs? Are they significant?

What are the variable costs? (production costs + shipping costs)

Any other?

Probability

based returns

example

Return on investment of alternative strategies weighted

by probability of outcome occurring:

Cashflow and probability “data” based on many, many

guesses

a very loose estimate only

Strategy

NPV of outcome

(

000)

$

Probability of

outcome

Risk

weighted

return

A

500

50

%

250

B

300

70

%

210

C

800

25

%

200

Problem

Strategy Development: A sequence

Strategy

formulation

Strategy

evaluation

Strategy

implementation

Performance

evaluation

Problem

definition


Choice

A

B

C

Now

make a decision

what is your

choice?

Example of Choice justification

Choice of strategy:

must be justified with both

numbers and arguments (5 marks in the final

report)

Strategy A

Strategy B

Why is a

choice

so important?

Must make a conscious

(

recorded) choice

, even if the

decision is to continue with the

current strategy

Otherwise you do not know

in a

year’s time

whether your

strategy was

successful

or

unsuccessful

Cannot learn

(

& so cannot

gain

experience)

This is what and how you are

learning now

Summary

Consider multiple alternative strategies

Evaluate which alternative “best” solves problem

(

importance of defining problem clearly

)

Strengths & weaknesses

Judged on a set of criteria

Must make a clear, conscious, recorded decision about

strategy choice (for future evaluations)

Marketing homework help

Assignment Type Mid Term Yuliia Fenchenko Date 12.03.2022

BCO225 Consumer Behavior

Assignment

Course Code: BCO225

Student Name: Yuliia Fenchenko

Course Name: Consumer Behavior

Professor Name: Eliza Paz

EU Business School (@EU_group) | Twitter

Table of Contents
Introduction 3
Segmentation 3
Buyer persona 4
Personal elements: Young achievers 5
Social elements 6
Cultural elements 7
Conclusion 7
Reference 9

Goodreads


Introduction

Goodreads is a subsidiary of Amazon and an American social cataloging website that helps users search through its collection of books, annotations, quotes, and reviews to locate what they need. By joining up and registering their books with the system, users may construct library catalogs and reading lists. Sharing their book recommendations, surveys and discussions is also an option on the website. Goodreads is headquartered in San Francisco, California (Walsh & Antoniak, 2021). The website includes author interviews, giveaways, and author bios, allowing customers to connect with their favorite authors. Most social media platforms, like Facebook and Twitter, have a Goodreads option. Goodreads users may integrate their Facebook friends’ contact information into their Goodreads account and grow their “Friends” list on the social networking site. Facebook friends, for example, can be notified of what a user is reading or how they rated a book by configuring Goodreads to publish straight to a user’s social networking account.

On the Goodreads website, a user’s library is built (Duvall, 2017). As a bonus, users may rate and review books, discover what their friends and favorite writers are reading, join discussion boards and groups, and get book suggestions based on their evaluations of books they’ve read. Those users who have a friend list will be able to browse and comment on their friends’ shelves and reviews. Each book on Goodreads is assigned a star rating out of one to five stars, with the opportunity to write a brief review in addition to the star rating. A Goodreads customer may listen to or read a sample chapter from a book they are interested in right there on the site. Additionally, Goodreads includes quizzes and trivia for its users, as well as quotations, book lists, and freebies for those who sign up. Members can subscribe to the monthly newsletter to stay up to date on the latest book releases, book ideas, author interviews, and new poems. If a person created the work, it might be linked to their author profile page, including a link to their blog. Goodreads also organizes physical events such as book swaps and “literary pub crawls” in addition to online choices.



Segmentation

All the available customers in Goodreads have different reasons to use the website. However, the young people are more than the middle-aged and the elderly customers. Most concerned parents relying on the website have children in school and college. The financially mature group comprises mostly people who want to learn more and increase their knowledge and skills about their careers (Kousha et al., 2017). Due to lack of commitments, the Hon Hun group tends to rely on the Goodreads website to attain articles that help them feel occupied at any time. Most of the solo content customers are after finding information to compare with their research methodologies and publish their findings on a certain topic.

Young achievers

Concerned mothers

Financially mature

Ho Hum

Solo content

Demographics

Young

Young, middle age, mostly female

Mature’ Skews male

Middle age, mostly female

Mature, male and female

Attitudes

Driven, risk-taker

Price sensitive, don’t know where to begin

Confident about financial matters, least price-sensitive

Late adopters, Not primarily risk-takers

Use social media,

Geographic

College

Most live in towns, professionals

City

Town

Town



Buyer persona


Name:
Customer Accounts Manager Grace


Roles:
Book Enthusiast, Technology Whizz


Goals:
Ensuring customers are satisfied with the offered services and products.


Challenges:
Cost reductions in the company, and Grace is searching for methods to streamline the process


Age:
30-40


Story;

Customer Service Manager Grace oversees anything from 300 to 400 accounts, and she is situated in the North-East of England. She enjoys socializing with her loved ones and friends. She travels from her home in the northeast of England to Leeds City Center to get to work. She is a mother of two. Grace’s company now employs 64 employees, although it has undergone reorganization and implemented a cost-cutting strategy in recent months. It’s Grace’s job to handle all the customer accounts throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland for a staff of eight. Grace’s responsibilities are handled by the Financial Director, who she reports directly to. Now, the company is making a significant marketing push to grow its current business. This firm relies mostly on word of mouth and referrals to sustain its current operations.

She has seen a significant increase in the volume of bills she is generating even though the company’s growth has been steady over the previous two years. Credit management has seen significant savings in the last six months, and payments are now being missed more frequently than before. Grace has received several complaints from customers who claim that their bank accounts have been debited more than what they expected or that no money has been taken from their accounts at all. Angry with the current scenario, Grace is now researching payment processing companies to present her results to the finance director. There are many ways to enhance the company’s payment processes because of Grace’s regular social media sites like Facebook.



Personal elements: Young achievers

A person’s purchasing decisions are heavily influenced by their place of employment. When it comes to reading, young people’s occupation directly influences what they purchase. A young person’s purchasing selections are influenced by the sort of employment and position they have (Maity et al., 2018). It is difficult for low-level students to purchase professional books for themselves. In contrast to working professionals, college and university students prefer studying online materials, mostly the summarized ones, to make it easy for them to understand.

Additional characteristics that influence customer purchasing decisions include age and lifetime. According to the research, teenagers are more likely to be interested in reading materials as they investigate and compare with different studies than middle-aged or older people, who are not mostly involved in academic work. One would expect a bachelor to spend a lot of time in libraries, searching research articles on the internet, buying books, and exchanging ideas in important for young people. People with families are more likely to buy books that will benefit their loved ones in the long run and help them build a better future for themselves and their children.

Young people’s purchasing tendency in Goodreads is directly proportional to the quantity of money they make each month. Young people spend what they have because of what they earn and spend it on. Young people with higher salaries from their part-time jobs are more likely to buy expensive, high-end reading materials than those with lower incomes, who are more likely to buy cheap articles (Duvall, 2017). What may seem important is the knowledge from the reading materials. A person with a modest income may find it difficult to spend their money on expensive articles. This affects the number of people who use the highly ranked research articles from Goodreads.

The term “lifestyle” is used to describe how an individual interacts with the rest of society. Using highly detailed research materials is for the readers to understand the methodology used in the study and the outcomes. Moreover, the use of several articles is important for readers to compare the similarity or differences of the results (Murray, 2021). It is the obligation of those who reside in affluent areas to preserve their social position and image by accessing books that increase their knowledge. Many factors contribute to a person’s lifestyle, including their sense of style, attitude, perception, social ties, and immediate environment. People have different attitudes on further studies when it comes to academic work. Therefore, not all young people are interested in reading affecting the level of customers at Goodreads.



Social elements

Demographics is one of the elements that determine consumer behavior in Goodreads. Each of the young customers has a distinct set of buying habits that should not be ignored. An individual’s level of education is an essential determinant of the books that require too much knowledge. Most of the Goodreads users and university students since the website helps them carry out secondary research. For obvious reasons, this is one of the most often discussed variables. Teenagers and retirees have quite distinct interests and preferences in reading articles and books from different authors. Women are more likely than men to search annotations and quotes that aren’t associated with their gender. Higher earners use their wealth differently than lower earners in having access to registered books, which is a buying benefit to Goodreads. As a result of young people’s upbringing, culture is viewed as the expectations and obligations people impose on generations.

Social considerations such as religion affect the articles the available customers specialize in. For example, books that contain Christian information are highly used by Christians. This makes it important for Goodreads to consider including the availability of articles that contain information about all religions on their website (Thelwall, 2019). The customers’ expectations from using the website directly impact the brand. The young customers come from different backgrounds, and hence the language they are comfortable with varies. It is a challenge for Goodreads to make it possible for the customers to translate the articles they need to the language of their interest.

Before digging deeper into the specifics on a certain topic, Goodreads customers must examine the required components to understand the research work. When the reading articles are designed so that it is easy for the young people to locate the books they want, this will attract more customers to the website. Once a course of action has been agreed upon, this factor determines how tough it will be to research a given topic (Wang et al., 2019). During a pandemic such as COVID-19, Goodreads is likely to have many customers since the lockdown rules limit the ability for people to interact in libraries and other learning centers. The availability of access to the Goodreads website on several social media platforms is advantageous for increasing purchasing power.



Cultural elements

Cultural factors have a huge impact on young people’s behavior. Culture, subculture, the family, the duties assigned to them, and socioeconomic status are all considered cultural influences on an individual’s purchasing behavior in Goodreads. In addition to other factors, socioeconomic class impacts consumers’ purchasing habits (Maity et al., 2018). Whether a person is aware of it or not, their socioeconomic class affects the brands and values of the products they seek to acquire. According to the current study, human beings are increasingly receptive to social stratification as a part of everyday life. The purchase behaviors of those in the same social group can impact the purchasing decisions of those who are not socially isolated. In certain societies, this influence and state of being influenced might take the shape of social approval (Thelwall & Kousha, 2017). If a customer in Goodreads is a member of the same socioeconomic class, they are likely to like books and review articles from the Goodreads website.



Conclusion

In conclusion, as a sociological fact, all groups from the most primitive tribes to the most homogeneous human society have class differences, regardless of their degree of development. It has been shown that cultural notions such as social classes may positively impact people’s lives (Walsh & Antoniak, 2021). Everyone is bound by the cultural norms that define their life, including everything from their daily routine to the preferred articles to read. More search on Goodreads is done on interesting subjects and life-connected topics. In industrialized nations, cultural characteristics have a considerable impact on people’s purchasing habits. Each person’s preferences and needs are unique, and meeting these needs is the basis for purchasing decisions. People must read and add on knowledge only about topics they find interesting in their lifestyle and career. Several elements might impact customers’ purchasing decisions, including their attitude and level of education. As a result of the Goodreads customers’ socioeconomic status, consumers’ purchase habits are impacted by their income level. If socioeconomic stratification persists, Goodreads’ website must adapt its marketing strategies to account for this.



Reference

Duvall, M.D., 2017. The impact of virtual literacy communities in an English language arts classroom: a case study using Goodreads. Drexel University.

Kousha, K., Thelwall, M. and Abdoli, M., 2017. Goodreads reviews to assess the wider impacts of books. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology68(8), pp.2004-2016.

Maity, S. K., Kumar, A., Mullick, A., Choudhary, V., & Mukherjee, A. (2018, January). Understanding Book Popularity on Goodreads. In Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference on Supporting Groupwork (pp. 117-121).

Murray, S., 2021. Secret agents: Algorithmic culture, Goodreads and datafication of the contemporary book world. European Journal of Cultural Studies24(4), pp.970-989.

Thelwall, M., 2019. Reader and author gender and genre in Goodreads. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science51(2), pp.403-430.

Thelwall, M. and Kousha, K., 2017. Goodreads: A social network site for book readers. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology68(4), pp.972-983.

Walsh, M. and Antoniak, M., 2021. The Goodreads ‘Classics’: A Computational Study of Readers, Amazon, and Crowdsourced Amateur Criticism. Journal of Cultural Analytics4, pp.243-287.

Wang, K., Liu, X. and Han, Y., 2019. Exploring Goodreads reviews for book impact assessment. Journal of Informetrics13(3), pp.874-886.

1

Eu bcn Student ID:

Marketing homework help

Course structure

716

Identifying

problems

Analysing

customers

Analysing

context

Analysing

distribution

Analysing

resources

Strategy

develop

ment

Strategy

evaluation

Implement

ation

Introduc

tion

Today

Learning objectives

1.

Reviewing

strategic alternatives

2.

Identify techniques for evaluating

which strategies

are likely to work best

3.

Understand the reasons

for making a conscious

decision about strategy

5

Strategy Evaluation

Very important part of your report

please check the

rubric.

Before you evaluate a strategy, check if you have

described and defined it well?

Are both strategic alternatives directly addressing the

problem identified?

Quick recap

One problem

alternative solutions

Problem effect

Problem 1

Alternative 1

Alternative 2

Alternative 3

Address the problem that causes

most problem

Come up with


competing


alternatives

to address problem

One problem and strategies

W

hich

problem first?

Prioritise and select

Opportunity for your specialisation knowledge

Problem

strategy link?

Only a clear set of strategy alternatives can be

evaluated

using a set of criteria.

Strategy

versus

Tactics

A strategy

helps a firm to achieve its

goals

in a way that is consistent

with the firm’s vision and mission

deliver a unique (mix of) value.

Tactics are relatively smaller and

specific steps to achieve that

strategic goal

; they can occur in

different departments (with shorter

time frames), best practices, etc

.

So,

tactics form the core components of

a

strategy.

E.g., Differentiation Strategy Vs Tactics

Strategy: Assume a company wants to implement product differentiation strategy

Tactics: There could be many supporting tactics – (i) product ingredients, (ii) functionalities, (iii) product design, (iv) packaging, (iii) customer support, and (iv) sales strategies etc.

Note:
Tactics could vary to achieve the main strategic goal of product differentiation.

Strategy description: Your description of strategic alternatives should cover both.

716 strategies types – broad categories

Promotion/Branding – promotion, advertisements, engagement, social media networks or collaborate with partners

Distribution – identifying channels, distributors – large retailers versus boutique, direct – online retailers or collaborate with partners

Product/value proposition – refining position, highlighting uniqueness, finding a niche in competition, aligning with the target market

These are just ideas – you will have to justify how they are relevant

Problem: “Get to Wellington”

Auckland

Wellington

Budget (financial resources)

Urgency (time resource)

Weight of luggage (other resources)

Other decision constraints

Tradeoffs

between alternatives:

Trade

offs between alternative strategies

STRATEGY

ADVANTAGE

DISADVANTAGE

Plane

Fast (3 hrs, incl. boarding)

Safe

Regular

schedule

Expensive

Limited luggage

Car

Take passengers at no extra cost

Carry up to 500kg

Transport in Wellington

Takes 9

hrs to drive

10

Tiring to drive

Dangerous

Train

See the countryside

Comfortable

Takes 12 hrs to get there

Moderate price

Bus

Low cost

See the countryside

Takes 12 hrs to get there

Uncomfortable

Cycle

Low cost

See the countryside

Adventure

Very

s

low (1 week?)

Dangerous

Tiring

, w

et & cold

Back to the problem

· You need a clear, one-sentence problem statement so you can check which strategy “solution” best solves it (but you need to give reasons justify it) [a couple of sentence is also fine – think of how to expand later]

· If your strategy does not solve the problem, you need a different strategy (or to modify your problem; then check the environment analysis)

Alignment between problem and strategy is a must

Problem Strategy Strategy definition formulation evaluation

Problem from environment analysis

Strategies that are clear can be evaluated objectively

Evaluation criteria

1.

Environmental consistency

:

makes sense in relation

to

context

and

external analysis

and expected

changes

2.

Consistent with available resources

:

VRIO

analysis;

aligned with

core competencies

and

capabilities

Evaluation criteria

continued

3.

Acceptable

degree of risk

:

ongoing value of resources;

investment length; size of commitment

a)

Internal

linked risks (preventable, if possible)

b)

External

linked risks (events outside firm’s control)

c)

Strategy risks

(

in order to generate high returns

)

Evaluation criteria

continued

4.

Appropriate

time (planning) horizon

Two years for the case

company

Evaluation criteria

continued

5.

Workable: practical

implementation;

performance

metrics

6

. Financial analysis of ‘

alternatives

FIRST: Need some sense of market / segment size and

growth

(

$$$s

)

Need some sense of

implementation costs

Present financial evidence

show sales revenue and costs

for two years

income statement

(

estimates only

)

Indicate one or more of the following

Return on investment (ROI)

Net present value (NPV) analysis

Breakeven analysis

Years to pay back investment (Payback period)

Estimating sales revenue and costs

Selling 1000 units of shampoo for US$20 = US$20,000

Is

it

per

month

or

year? (20,000 X 12 = US$240,000)

What is cost of sales?

How

many

revenue

streams?

Estimating sales revenue and costs

Month

wise figures can capture both growth, promotions and seasonal impacts

Estimating sales revenue

determinants

Sales

revenue:

Size of

the

target market

Price

that

you

would

recommend

Distribution channel that you would use

Margins

that

you

need

to

pay

to

the

channel

s

Area

whole

country

or one/two states

Any

other?

Cost of goods

sold:

Depends on how much you sell (the more you sell, more

the

cost)

Payment to advertising or partners

Promotion strategy/types

What are the fixed costs? Are they significant?

What are the variable costs? (production costs + shipping costs)

Any other?

Probability

based returns

example

Return on investment of alternative strategies weighted

by probability of outcome occurring:

Cashflow and probability “data” based on many, many

guesses

a very loose estimate only

Strategy

NPV of outcome

(

000)

$

Probability of

outcome

Risk

weighted

return

A

500

50

%

250

B

300

70

%

210

C

800

25

%

200

Problem

Strategy Development: A sequence

Strategy

formulation

Strategy

evaluation

Strategy

implementation

Performance

evaluation

Problem

definition


Choice

A

B

C

Now

make a decision

what is your

choice?

Example of Choice justification

Choice of strategy:

must be justified with both

numbers and arguments (5 marks in the final

report)

Strategy A

Strategy B

Why is a

choice

so important?

Must make a conscious

(

recorded) choice

, even if the

decision is to continue with the

current strategy

Otherwise you do not know

in a

year’s time

whether your

strategy was

successful

or

unsuccessful

Cannot learn

(

& so cannot

gain

experience)

This is what and how you are

learning now

Summary

Consider multiple alternative strategies

Evaluate which alternative “best” solves problem

(

importance of defining problem clearly

)

Strengths & weaknesses

Judged on a set of criteria

Must make a clear, conscious, recorded decision about

strategy choice (for future evaluations)

Marketing homework help


Data Brief

1. Read and review the word document called “Data Brief Sample”. Use it as an example to write a new
data brief
document related on covid

2. Use this link” https://data.chhs.ca.gov/dataset/vaccine-progress-dashboard/resource/faee36da-bd8c-40f7-96d4-d8f283a12b0a “ to download the Excel file for the COVID-19 Vaccines Administered By Demographics. (Data Source)

3. P.S: The data brief should focus on covid-19 vaccines in the state of California. Don’t use any other source than the one I provided “ https://data.chhs.ca.gov/dataset/vaccine-progress-dashboard/resource/faee36da-bd8c-40f7-96d4-d8f283a12b0a

Assignment: Your two large projects for this course (dashboard and analysis presentation) are based on the data source you have chosen.  The first step in establishing your plan for those projects is to create a data brief.  A data brief is a document that outlines key information about your analysis and visualization plans.  Please create a data brief final  draft that outlines your plans for your dashboard and analysis presentation. 

The data brief should be a Word document containing the following elements:

What is your project’s context?

        Origin Curiosities

        Circumstances

        People

        Constraints

        Consumption

        Deliverables

        Resources

Audience
      Details about your audience

      How does the audience impact your work as data visualization designer?

      How does the audience impact your work as an analysis presenter?

Data Set

      Relevant data set information

Constraints

     Did you encounter any issue while working with data source?

What you need to create is a Word document between 1,000 to 1,500 words and include visuals (hand written drawings, sketches, pics, not perfect charts, other) that demonstrate your initial vision/purpose/ideas.

Your paper should include a cover page with your name, date, and title of the paper.  It must be attractively and professionally formatted and must include at least two visuals that demonstrate your initial vision/purpose/ideas. You should consider this a client facing document and it should reflect how you would like to represent yourself to them professionally.

Add as the last page of your data brief this document: Data_Source_Details_Last_Page of_Your Data_Brief





Marketing homework help

STUDENT

STUDENT – KNOWLEDGE ASSESSMENT TASK

Task Number


1 of 3

Task Name

Knowledge Assessment

National unit/s code

CPCCBC5007B

National unit/s title

Administer the Legal Obligations of a Building or Construction Contractor

National qualification code

CPC50210

National qualification title

Diploma of Building and Construction (Building)

RMIT Program code

C5256A

RMIT Course code

BUIL6238C

Section A – Assessment Information

Duration and/or due date:

Due at the end of week 4

Task Instructions

Summary and Purpose of Assessment

This short-answer assessment task is one (1) of three (3) assessment tasks you need to complete satisfactorily, in order to be deemed competent for this unit.

This assessment task allows you to demonstrate your knowledge required to administer the legal obligations of a building or construction contractor, including obligations as either party to a contract.

Assessment Instructions

For this assessment you are asked to answer ten (10) questions which relate to a range of relevant industry legislation, codes, standards, regulations, licensing, employee awards, agreements, OHS, taxation and insurance. Please answer all questions using full sentences. Dot point answers will be acceptable when you are required to “List” items.

What

You have been working in the building and construction industry for a while and are at a stage where you believe you are ready to pursue your entrepreneurship dream by starting your own construction business. Being a highly regulated industry, you wanted to ensure that your business meets all the legal requirements with respect to licensing and registration, and from an operation perspective, you wanted to create an operation manual which detail all the policies, procedures, tools such as templates and checklist in which you staff can refer to on a day to day basis.

You first task is to undertake extensive research about the business obligations so new policies, procedures, tools and a licensing and registration for your business can be established.

Your research will need to address the ten (10) questions provided using examples. You must address each component of the question. You may use additional sources of information, such as weblinks, images and sketches, tables, charts and other methods to demonstrate ideas and concepts, however the bulk of your answer must be text.

Where

This assessment will take place in class or as directed by your Assessor and will be submitted via RMIT’s Canvas platform by the due date, for assessment

How

All ten (10) questions must be answered correctly for you to be assessed as satisfactory for this assessment task

· Satisfactory (S) performance- able to complete all the questions correctly

· Not Yet Satisfactory (NYS) performance – not able to complete all the questions correctly

Students need to achieve satisfactory (S) results in all three (3) assessments to be deemed Competent (CA).

Conditions for assessment

1. This is an individual written assessment task.

1. This is an individual task that you must complete with minimal support from others

1. You must submit all assessment evidence as instructed.

1. You must complete the task within the maximum allowed duration.

1. You must be observed undertaking this assessment task by a qualified assessor.

1. You must make arrangements with the assessor at least one week prior to the assessment due date if you feel you require special allowance or allowable adjustment to this task

1. You will have the opportunity to resubmit any product deemed unsatisfactory (one re-submit is allowed per unit).

1. You can negotiate a suitable time and location for assessment at least one week prior to the assessment taking place.

1. This assessment task is completed individually, and you will be assessed individually against all assessment criteria.

1. Students found in breach of assessment conditions can be charged with academic misconduct, have their results cancelled, be excluded from the program and receive other penalties. Penalties can also apply if a student’s test material is copied by others.

1. Plagiarism is the presentation of the work, idea or creation of another person as though it is one’s own. It is a form of cheating and is a very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University. Plagiarised material can be drawn from, and presented in, written, graphic and visual form, including electronic data, and oral presentations. Plagiarism occurs when the origin of the material used is not appropriately cited.

1. RMIT special consideration is to enable student to maintain their academic progress despite adverse circumstances. The process for special consideration can be found at http://www1.rmit.edu.au/students/specialconsideration

1. Students with a disability or long-term medical or mental health condition can apply for adjustments to their study and assessment conditions (Reasonable Adjustments and Equitable Assessment Arrangements) by registering with the Equitable Learning Services (ELS) at https://www.rmit.edu.au/students/support-and-facilities/student-support/equitable-learning-services

1. Please ensure students full and correct name is written on the student version of this assessment task (do not use nicknames or abbreviations).

1. You will be assessed as satisfactory or not yet satisfactory.

1. Student can appeal the assessment decision according to the RMIT Assessment Processes.

Instructions on submitting your knowledge assessment

This assessment must be undertaken in the classroom and submitted via RMIT’s CANVAS platform by the due date, for assessment.

Equipment/resources students must supply:

Equipment/resources to be provided by RMIT or the workplace:

· Pen/pencil

· Paper

· Laptop/PC with internet access

· CANVAS

· RMIT internet access

· RMIT Computer Labs and Learning

· Resources/Software

Section B – Student Answer Sheet

Student Name

JICHENG GU

Student ID

S3915985

Students provide your responses in the boxes below each question

Questions

Satisfactory

Y N




Q1: Identify the awards and agreements applying to employees and subcontractors in the building and construction industry which may also apply to your individual business:

· Carpenter

· Site Supervisor

· Labourer

· Electrician

· Plumber

Note: Where an award applies to the industry, but not your business, you should state your reasons why it does not apply.

A:

· Carpenter – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Site Supervisor – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Labourer – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Electrician – The electrical, electronic and communications contracting award 2010

· Plumber – Plumbing and fire sprinklers award 2020

Q2: List and describe the legislative requirements that apply to building and construction businesses. You will need to undertake research to complete this task. It is suggested that you combine this information into a reference table that identifies the legislation or regulation, codes and other standards and the requirements to be applied.

You will need to identify the legislative requirements related to:

·
Business registration

· Taxation, accounting and reporting

· Payroll and superannuation

· Fair trading including dispute resolution

· Environmental management, sustainability and emergency responses

· Human resource management including employees and subcontractors

· Occupational health and safety, rehabilitation and return to work

·
Noise abatement and working hours

NOTE: If you have complete this research in previous assessments and units, you can bring this forward, add any additional or relevant details and ensure that it addresses all other questions in this assignment. You should continue to use and add to your working list of legislation, regulation, codes and standards throughout your training.

A:

Governing Act/Legislative requirements/What business owner needs to do (list 3-5 items)

Business registration


· A New Tax System (Australian Business Number)

· Apply for a business name

· Complete Tax registration for business

· Decide on business structure (e.g sole trader, partnership, company, trust)

Being the owner of the business, we are legally required by law to have an Australian Business Number and a Australian Company Number if your enterprise is a company.

Taxation, accounting and reporting

· Victoria The Taxation Administration Act 1997(TAA)

· Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 (ITAA 1936) and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA1997)

· Victoria Payroll Tax Act 2007

· A New Tax System (Pay As You Go) Act 1999

· Fringe Benefits Tax Assessment Act 1986

· Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

· Public Finance and Audit Act 1983

All records of cash flow and accounting reports or financial documentations have to file accordance to the Australian Taxation Office. As a building practitioner all financial cash flow both loses and profit had to be reported accordingly to the ATO.

Payroll and superannuation

· Fair Work Act 2009

· National Employment Standards (FWOFS13.0)

· Corporations Act 2001

· Superannuation Act 1976

· Paid Parental Leave Act 2020

By law, employers have to have superannuation for their employees. And employees have to withhold a minimum value of 10% of the employee’s wages as for their superannuation.

Fair trading including dispute resolution

· Fair Trading Act 1987

· The Competition and Consumer Act 2010

· Australian Consumer Law and Fair Trading Act 2012

· Building and Development Certifiers Act 2018

· Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 1999

For any dispute, its advice that building practitioner to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal in relation to the clients, or if a building practitioner could bring a fellow practitioner to the Victorian Building Authority for any related issues. Practitioners are advice to have keep any documentations relating to the project them involve in as evidence for the future.

Environmental management, sustainability and emergency responses

· Environment Protection Act 1986

· The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

Sample actions such as having a recycle skip for either Gypsum plasterboards or for Metal are some ways where a building practitioner can help to manage and limit the environment impact while in charge of a project. The failure to do so may result in heavy penalty.

Human resource management including employees and subcontractors

· Victoria Workers Compensation Act 1958

· Victoria’s Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004

· Fair Work Act 2009

· Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

· Privacy Act 1988

· Crimes Act 1958

· Equal Opportunity Act 2010

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013

· Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986

· Racial and Religious Tolerance Act 2001

· The Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995

· Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 2002

Rights such as mutual respect and cultural acceptance of different racial background are some basic rights for employees in a workplace setting. As no one should deserve unnecessary harassments or abuse due to any differences. Human Resource Management Plan will have necessary details to ensure a positive working environment.

Occupational health and safety, rehabilitation and return to work

· Occupation health and Safety Act 2004

· Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRC Act)

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Regulation 2014

OH&S policies are in place to ensure that workplace setting is meeting the necessary safety and health standard to enhance the wellbeing of the individuals.

Noise abatement and working hours

· Environment Protection Act 2017

· Environment Protection Regulation 2021

· Fair Work Act 2009

Ensuring builder to follow local council noise management standard to avoid causing unnecessary disturbance to the neighbours in the surrounding environment.

a.











Discuss the options of using renewable materials over non-renewable materials and low energy materials over high energy materials where possible in order to meet the intent of the environmental legislation and the requirement of sustainability. You must outline at minimum the process of life cycle assessment for building materials and the concept of embodied energy.


We are traditionally used to using earth bricks, concrete, and wood in construction. For a better world, there are new processes, and sustainable as well as renewable materials alternatives that can be used in construction.

Embodied energy is the energy associated with the manufacturing of a product or services. The renewable materials is much more lower than non-renewable materials.

For timber, is first being growth in the forest and then being cut down and process in saw mill to be cut and stripped down in to varies shape and sizes depending on the needs of the design. However, no addition treatment and processed is needed much compared to manufacturing process of concrete.

It is also in recycling concrete is a cost effective and sustainable solution for your next project. Using recycled products can supplement traditional crushed rock and aggregates. The quality and performance of recycled crushed concrete is equivalent to virgin aggregate and in most cases more cost effective. It has been used successfully in pavement and road construction by many local councils throughout Australia.

The life cycle stages include: Material extraction, Transportation, Assembly, Construction, Operational Influence of the materials, Maintenance, and Disposal. Moreover the concept of embodied energy relates to a component of Life cycle assessment meaning it is the energy consumed by all of the processes associated with the production of a material throughout the manufacturing process.

What processes could a business use (including the policies, procedures and tools needed to support these) to ensure compliance with environmental protection legislation?


· Get an environmental audit

· An environmental audit can help to assess the nature and extent of your business’s current impacts on the environment. This will enable you to:

· identify how you could reduce your impact

· prioritise environmental management activities

· demonstrate your accountability to government, customers and shareholders.

· Set up an environmental management system

· Once you have an understanding of your current impact, an environmental management system (EMS) can help you to plan ahead to manage future impacts on the environment. An EMS can also make it easier to get certain permits for business activities.

Your EMS should: 

· identify the environmental impact of your business

· set your environmental objectives and targets

· provide your operational and emergency procedures for environmental issues

· outline responsibilities and your reporting structure

· identify areas for ongoing improvement.

· Report on your impacts

· It’s a good idea to regularly monitor and report on your impacts on the environment. Common environmental reports made by businesses include:

· greenhouse gas and energy reporting

· corporate sustainability or triple bottom line reporting

· natural resource management monitoring.




·

Check government requirements

· Australian, state and local governments jointly administer the environmental protection laws in Australia. Environmental laws that affect your business will depend on your business type. As a business owner, you need to understand which laws apply to your business and make sure you meet requirements.

· You may require environmental licences and permits for certain business activities.

b.








In regards to fair trading legislation, what are the key rights and obligations of consumers? How are these administered? Discuss the meaning of ‘implied warranties’ in this context.


Fair trading laws ensure that trading is fair for your business and your customers. The Competition and consumer act 2010 act broadly covers unfair market practices, industry codes, product safety and product labelling.

The law requires builders and tradespeople to honour warranties and:

· carry out the work in a proper and workmanlike manner, in accordance with the plans and specifications set out in the contract

· ensure all materials supplied by the builder are good and suitable for the purpose and are new, unless otherwise stated in the contract

· carry out the work in accordance with all laws and legal requirements, including the Building Act 1993

· carry out the work with reasonable care and skill and complete works by the date (or within the period) specified by the contract

· ensure new homes, extensions, renovations, repairs and kit homes are suitable for occupation when completed

· ensure other types of work and the material used are fit for the intended purpose.

Implied warranties apply to all building work. The Building Act 1993 allows action to be brought against a builder for up to 10 years from the date the work was completed. This right transfers to a new owner if the property is sold within this time. For more information, seek legal advice – including if the building work is older than 10 years.

Domestic building insurance protects consumers in the event that you die, become insolvent or disappear, and cannot finish the building project or fix defects. It covers costs up to $300,000 to fix structural defects for six years, and non-structural defects for two years.

c. In regards to taxation, GST, superannuation and insurance requirements, discuss the requirements of each of the key legislation and the options you have for complying with each. Include in your answer examples of the types of business processes required to support the requirements.

·

Taxation

In different level taxation requirement different.

In this business structure, the company:

· must apply for a tax file number (TFN) and use it when lodging its annual tax return

· is entitled to an Australian business number (ABN) if it is registered under the Corporations Act 2001. A company not registered under the Corporations law may register for an ABN if it is carrying on an enterprise in Australia

· must be registered for GST if its annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· owns the money that the business earns – the individuals who control the business cannot take money out of the business, except as a formal distribution of the profits or wages

· must lodge an annual company tax return

· usually pays its income tax by instalments through the pay as you go (PAYG) instalments system

· pays tax at the company tax rate or lower company tax rate (if a base rate entity)

· may be eligible for small business concessions

· must pay super guarantee contributions (SGC) for any eligible workers. This includes you, if you are a director of the company, and any other company directors.

As a sole trader, you:

· use your individual tax file number when lodging your income tax return

· report all your income in your individual tax return, using the section for business items to show your business income and expenses (there is no separate business tax return for sole traders)

· apply for an ABN and use your ABN for all your business dealings

· register for Goods and Services Tax (GST) if your annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· pay tax at the same income tax rates as individual taxpayers and you may be eligible for the small business tax offset

· put aside money to pay your income tax at the end of the financial year – usually, you will do this by paying quarterly Pay As You Go (PAYG) instalmentsclaim a deduction for any personal super contributions you make after notifying your fund.

In a partnership business structure:

· income, losses and control of the business are shared among the partners

· the partnership has its own TFN and must lodge an annual partnership return showing all income and deductions of the business

· the partnership doesn’t pay income tax on the profit it earns – each partner reports their share of the partnership income in their own tax return

· each partner pays tax on their share of the partnership profit at the individual tax rate and may be eligible for the small business tax offset

· the partnership must apply for an ABN and use it for all business dealings

· the partnership must be registered for GST if its annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more.

If you use a trust for your business structure, the trust:

· must have its own tax file number (TFN) for lodging its annual tax return

· must apply for an ABN and use it for all business dealings

· must be registered for GST if annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· may be liable to pay tax depending on the wording of its deed and whether any income the trust earns is distributed to its beneficiaries

· may be able to access small business tax concessions

· must pay super for any of its employees (this may include the trustee if they are also employed by the trust).

· GST

You must register for GST:

· when your business or enterprise has a GST turnover (gross income from all businesses minus GST) of $75,000 or more – see Working out your GST turnover

· when you start a new business and expect your turnover to reach the GST threshold (or more) in the first year of operation

· if you’re already in business and have reached the GST threshold

· if your non-profit organisation has a GST turnover of $150,000 per year or more

· when you provide taxi or limousine travel for passengers (including ride-sourcing) regardless of your GST turnover – this applies to both owner drivers and if you lease or rent a taxi

· if you want to claim fuel tax credits for your business or enterprise.

·

Superannuation

Superannuation, or ‘super’, is money put aside by your employer over your working life for you to live on when you retire from work.

Super is important for you, because the more you save, the more money you will have for your retirement.

You can only withdraw your super money in certain circumstances – for example, when you retire or turn 65 years old.

For most people, your employer pays money – ‘contributions’ – into a super account for you. This is called the ‘super guarantee’. They pay these contributions on top of your salary and wages. There are laws about how much super your employer must pay.

Generally, your employer must pay super for you if you are:

18 years old or over, and are paid $450 or more (before tax) in a calendar month

under 18 years old, being paid $450 or more (before tax) in a calendar month and work more than 30 hours in a week.

· Insurance

As a registered building practitioner, you must have the appropriate insurance for your registration category/class.

The VBA requires evidence that you have insurance or are eligible to purchase insurance (in some cases) before we can grant your application for registration or renew your registration. A company registered as a building practitioner must hold the required insurance in the company’s name.

If we learn that you are no longer covered by the required insurance, we must suspend your registration.

There are three types of insurance for registered building practitioners.

You need professional indemnity insurance for registration in any of the following building practitioner categories and classes:

· Building surveyor (unlimited)

· Building surveyor (limited)

· Building inspector (unlimited)

· Building inspector (limited)

· Building inspector (pool safety)

· Quantity surveyor

· Endorsed Building Engineer (civil, mechanical, electrical and fire safety classes)

· Draftsperson (building design) (architectural, interior and services classes).


https://www.vba.vic.gov.au/building/renewals-other-requirements/building-insurance-requirements

d.




In regards to OHS, welfare, workers’ compensation, noise abatement and working hours legislation and regulations, what are the requirements and how can you ensure your business complies?


· OHS


OHS requirements through safe work practices at any on or off-site construction workplace. It requires the performance of work in a safe manner through awareness of risks and work requirements, and the planning and performance of safe work practices with concern for personal safety and the safety of others. For achieve this part, we have to provide training a

Marketing homework help

1) Main steps you plan to take to pursue the objectives and find the solution within the clear and structured timeline

Objectives 

 

This proposal outlines the right marketing plan for strong your company’s brand awareness along with the detailed descriptions of our recommendations and steps. 

 

· Design a new logo for smart the brand recognition. 

· Develop a website and order booking system. 

· Spread your brand with Social Media marketing  

Monitoring brand reputation by using social media marketing platform and using influencer’s positive effect to promote brand.  

· Provide the SEO tools to optimize the website’s traffic. 

· Invest in PPC Advertising 

· Email Marketing 

· Pose contents about the company’s background and share the tips for cleaning to inspire customers 

· Distribute flyers include service, description, discount, availability and sells directly to customers 

· “Word of Mouth” Encourage a referral program to meet up with potential customers in person. 

· Maintain the reputation, listen and fulfill customer’s needs    

 

 

Mission 

Enhance the brand awareness and attract customers, showing respect to the customers are the powerful sustainable advantages for the organizations. Provide the professional highest standard cleaning technology to meet the customer’s requirement and keep the good relationship with them.  

 

 

Description of Potential Solutions 


Organizational Branding
 

Creating a corporate brand is an important task; identifying the mission, values, vision, slogan, and logo provides an entity for “Jetsudz Cleaning Inc.” and effectively promotes the business to the potential client (Ajike, 2015). 

  


Market segmentation and market boundaries
 

The segmentation and delimitation of the customers of Jetsudz Cleaning Inc. company is a critical element in determining where the company is targeting its customers. Creating a list of potential customers and classifying them into diverse groups allows companies to develop strategies for the right audiences (Dolnicar et al., 2018). 

  


Marketing Communication Tools
 

In promoting Jetsudz Cleaning Inc., it is necessary to use marketing tools effectively. The idea is to massively reach the public by advertising the trade name and highlighting the professional work that the company does and the mission of the organization. A clear marketing strategy is a primary tool to reach customers and create trade bonds (Nikunen et al.,2017). 

  


Create a professional Website and Provide SEO tools
 

When a business has a website, it raises its prestige while allowing customers to increase their confidence level in the product or service. A website will help boost the sales, productivity, and market value of Jetsudz Cleaning Inc. (Ntui, 2021). 

This proposal will give the main recommendations for creating and managing the company website. 

 

 

 

 

Marketing homework help


Environmental Scan

MKTU 605: Week 2 Assignment and Rubric

Length: 1-3 Pages

Due: Sunday of Week 2, by 11:59 pm PT

Value: 80 Points











Read the rubric below to develop a scope of work.






Referring to the discussion about the purpose of the environmental scan, examine the environmental factors that impact the marketing plan of your product/service.






Next, develop an environmental scan for your product or service; include at least six environmental factors. Then, create an infographic that presents your findings.






Be sure to explain, in a detailed narrative, how and why the environmental variables can/or might impact your product or service, both positively and negatively. Discuss how each environmental factor can be mitigated and/or exploited in the marketing plan. Do not leave the interpretation of the graphic to the reader to discern. Always explain the takeaways you want the reader to comprehend.






This assignment is due Sunday of week 2 by 11:59 pm.







Rubric: Evaluation Criteria

Grading Elements

Exemplary

Proficient

Developing

Emerging

Environmental Factors Description

20 –18

Clearly and concisely describes six environmental factors that will/can impact the marketing plan of your product/service.

17-14

Fairly clearly describes six environmental factors that will/can impact the marketing plan of your product/service.

.

13 – 11

Describes four or more environmental factors that impact will/can the marketing plan of your product/service.

.

10 – 0

Vaguely describes fewer than 3 environmental factors that will/can impact the marketing plan of your product/service.

Environmental Scan Impacts

20-18

Clearly and concisely describes how the environmental factor can be mitigated and/or exploited.

17-14

Fairly clearly describes the environmental factor can be mitigated and/or exploited.

13-11

Somewhat describes how the environmental factor can be mitigated and/or exploited.

10 – 0

Vaguely describes how the environmental factor can be mitigated or exploited.

References

20-18

Lists at least five references supporting the environmental scan.

17-14

Lists at least five references supporting the environmental scan.

13-11

Lists at least three references supporting the environmental scan.

10 – 0

Lists fewer than two references supporting the environmental scan.

.

Writing & Presentation Mechanics and APA

20-18

The narrative and presentation is logical, well-written, and the required length. Spelling, grammar and, punctuation are accurate. The Paper is APA formatted.

The presentation applies the graphic called out in the assignment description.

The presentation is not text-heavy and uses bullet points that spark interest. The presentation is supported by data, and is visually appealing, and is easy to understand.

17-14

The narrative and presentation is logical, well-written, and is the required length. Minor errors in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation. Paper is somewhat APA formatted.

The presentation applies the graphic called out in the assignment description.

The presentation is not overly text-heavy and uses bullet points that spark interest. The presentation is supported by data and is somewhat visually appealing, and easy to understand.

13-11

The narrative and presentation is somewhat logical and is the required length. Minor errors in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation. Paper is partially APA formatted.

The presentation does not apply the graphic called out in the assignment description.

The presentation is somewhat text-heavy. The presentation is not supported by data, and is not visually appealing, nor easy to understand.

10 – 0

The narrative and presentation lack clarity and may be confusing and too long or too short. Paper is not APA formatted.

Numerous errors in spelling, grammar and/or punctuation.

The presentation does not apply the graphic called out in the assignment description.

The presentation is text-heavy. The presentation is not supported by data.

MKTU 605 Rubric Week 2 Assignment Page of 2 02/2020

Marketing homework help

SWOT Analysis Outline

Part 1: Company Summary

A. The summary should present a description of a company, its product/service, its target market and its need within that market. The summary should also present an overview of the main points of the analysis.

B. Outline the relationship between the organization’s mission, objectives, and strategy.

C. The summary should identify 3 problems or issues currently facing the company

Part 2: Situation Analysis

INTERNAL ANALYSIS

A. Describe the company’s current product(s) or service(s).

1. What are their sales in dollars?

2. What is their share of the market?

3. How do they compare to the competition?

4. Describe all major competitors and their products.

B. Analyze and describe the company’s internal strengths.

C. Analyze and describe the company’s internal weaknesses.

D. Analyze and describe the company’s potential opportunities.

E. Analyze and describe the company’s potential threats.

F. Describe how the company is performing the industry. (e.g., market shares, company resources, existing customers, etc).

EXTERNAL ANALYSIS (EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT)

A. Describe important external conditions and/or trends affecting the industry:

Social Legal/Regulatory

Technological Competitive

Economic Institutional

1. Is the size of the firms market increasing or decreasing and how quickly?

2. Why has the market remained stable or changed?

B. Do these conditions create opportunities for the firm or do these conditions pose threats?

Part 3: Recommendations

A. What are you recommendations to solve the issues outlined above based on your analysis?

B. What tool and or resources are necessary to implement your proposed recommendations.

C. What is the required budget and schedule for implementing these recommendations?

D. How will you monitor and track the progress related to these recommendations?

E. What are you contingency plans if these recommendations prove not to be working?

Part 4: Conclusion

A. Why was your analysis important?

B. How will this analysis improved on the issues identified?

C. What steps can be taken to insure that similar issues don’t develop in the future?

Your paper must be submitted in APA format with a cover page and references.

Power Points

A. The PowerPoint presentation should be at least 12 slides in length.

B. Slide will be evaluated based on readability, aesthetics, and analysis overview.

ALTERNATIVE OUTLINE

Company History

Market Position Strategy

Product or Service Advantages

Targeted Customers

Top Competitors

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunity

Threats & Trends

Strategic Recommendations

Conclusions

Marketing homework help

STUDENT

STUDENT – KNOWLEDGE ASSESSMENT TASK

Task Number


1 of 3

Task Name

Knowledge Assessment

National unit/s code

CPCCBC5007B

National unit/s title

Administer the Legal Obligations of a Building or Construction Contractor

National qualification code

CPC50210

National qualification title

Diploma of Building and Construction (Building)

RMIT Program code

C5256A

RMIT Course code

BUIL6238C

Section A – Assessment Information

Duration and/or due date:

Due at the end of week 4

Task Instructions

Summary and Purpose of Assessment

This short-answer assessment task is one (1) of three (3) assessment tasks you need to complete satisfactorily, in order to be deemed competent for this unit.

This assessment task allows you to demonstrate your knowledge required to administer the legal obligations of a building or construction contractor, including obligations as either party to a contract.

Assessment Instructions

For this assessment you are asked to answer ten (10) questions which relate to a range of relevant industry legislation, codes, standards, regulations, licensing, employee awards, agreements, OHS, taxation and insurance. Please answer all questions using full sentences. Dot point answers will be acceptable when you are required to “List” items.

What

You have been working in the building and construction industry for a while and are at a stage where you believe you are ready to pursue your entrepreneurship dream by starting your own construction business. Being a highly regulated industry, you wanted to ensure that your business meets all the legal requirements with respect to licensing and registration, and from an operation perspective, you wanted to create an operation manual which detail all the policies, procedures, tools such as templates and checklist in which you staff can refer to on a day to day basis.

You first task is to undertake extensive research about the business obligations so new policies, procedures, tools and a licensing and registration for your business can be established.

Your research will need to address the ten (10) questions provided using examples. You must address each component of the question. You may use additional sources of information, such as weblinks, images and sketches, tables, charts and other methods to demonstrate ideas and concepts, however the bulk of your answer must be text.

Where

This assessment will take place in class or as directed by your Assessor and will be submitted via RMIT’s Canvas platform by the due date, for assessment

How

All ten (10) questions must be answered correctly for you to be assessed as satisfactory for this assessment task

· Satisfactory (S) performance- able to complete all the questions correctly

· Not Yet Satisfactory (NYS) performance – not able to complete all the questions correctly

Students need to achieve satisfactory (S) results in all three (3) assessments to be deemed Competent (CA).

Conditions for assessment

1. This is an individual written assessment task.

1. This is an individual task that you must complete with minimal support from others

1. You must submit all assessment evidence as instructed.

1. You must complete the task within the maximum allowed duration.

1. You must be observed undertaking this assessment task by a qualified assessor.

1. You must make arrangements with the assessor at least one week prior to the assessment due date if you feel you require special allowance or allowable adjustment to this task

1. You will have the opportunity to resubmit any product deemed unsatisfactory (one re-submit is allowed per unit).

1. You can negotiate a suitable time and location for assessment at least one week prior to the assessment taking place.

1. This assessment task is completed individually, and you will be assessed individually against all assessment criteria.

1. Students found in breach of assessment conditions can be charged with academic misconduct, have their results cancelled, be excluded from the program and receive other penalties. Penalties can also apply if a student’s test material is copied by others.

1. Plagiarism is the presentation of the work, idea or creation of another person as though it is one’s own. It is a form of cheating and is a very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University. Plagiarised material can be drawn from, and presented in, written, graphic and visual form, including electronic data, and oral presentations. Plagiarism occurs when the origin of the material used is not appropriately cited.

1. RMIT special consideration is to enable student to maintain their academic progress despite adverse circumstances. The process for special consideration can be found at http://www1.rmit.edu.au/students/specialconsideration

1. Students with a disability or long-term medical or mental health condition can apply for adjustments to their study and assessment conditions (Reasonable Adjustments and Equitable Assessment Arrangements) by registering with the Equitable Learning Services (ELS) at https://www.rmit.edu.au/students/support-and-facilities/student-support/equitable-learning-services

1. Please ensure students full and correct name is written on the student version of this assessment task (do not use nicknames or abbreviations).

1. You will be assessed as satisfactory or not yet satisfactory.

1. Student can appeal the assessment decision according to the RMIT Assessment Processes.

Instructions on submitting your knowledge assessment

This assessment must be undertaken in the classroom and submitted via RMIT’s CANVAS platform by the due date, for assessment.

Equipment/resources students must supply:

Equipment/resources to be provided by RMIT or the workplace:

· Pen/pencil

· Paper

· Laptop/PC with internet access

· CANVAS

· RMIT internet access

· RMIT Computer Labs and Learning

· Resources/Software

Section B – Student Answer Sheet

Student Name

JICHENG GU

Student ID

S3915985

Students provide your responses in the boxes below each question

Questions

Satisfactory

Y N




Q1: Identify the awards and agreements applying to employees and subcontractors in the building and construction industry which may also apply to your individual business:

· Carpenter

· Site Supervisor

· Labourer

· Electrician

· Plumber

Note: Where an award applies to the industry, but not your business, you should state your reasons why it does not apply.

A:

· Carpenter – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Site Supervisor – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Labourer – Building and construction general onsite award 2010

· Electrician – The electrical, electronic and communications contracting award 2010

· Plumber – Plumbing and fire sprinklers award 2020

Q2: List and describe the legislative requirements that apply to building and construction businesses. You will need to undertake research to complete this task. It is suggested that you combine this information into a reference table that identifies the legislation or regulation, codes and other standards and the requirements to be applied.

You will need to identify the legislative requirements related to:

·
Business registration

· Taxation, accounting and reporting

· Payroll and superannuation

· Fair trading including dispute resolution

· Environmental management, sustainability and emergency responses

· Human resource management including employees and subcontractors

· Occupational health and safety, rehabilitation and return to work

·
Noise abatement and working hours

NOTE: If you have complete this research in previous assessments and units, you can bring this forward, add any additional or relevant details and ensure that it addresses all other questions in this assignment. You should continue to use and add to your working list of legislation, regulation, codes and standards throughout your training.

A:

Governing Act/Legislative requirements/What business owner needs to do (list 3-5 items)

Business registration


· A New Tax System (Australian Business Number)

· Apply for a business name

· Complete Tax registration for business

· Decide on business structure (e.g sole trader, partnership, company, trust)

Being the owner of the business, we are legally required by law to have an Australian Business Number and a Australian Company Number if your enterprise is a company.

Taxation, accounting and reporting

· Victoria The Taxation Administration Act 1997(TAA)

· Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 (ITAA 1936) and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA1997)

· Victoria Payroll Tax Act 2007

· A New Tax System (Pay As You Go) Act 1999

· Fringe Benefits Tax Assessment Act 1986

· Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

· Public Finance and Audit Act 1983

All records of cash flow and accounting reports or financial documentations have to file accordance to the Australian Taxation Office. As a building practitioner all financial cash flow both loses and profit had to be reported accordingly to the ATO.

Payroll and superannuation

· Fair Work Act 2009

· National Employment Standards (FWOFS13.0)

· Corporations Act 2001

· Superannuation Act 1976

· Paid Parental Leave Act 2020

By law, employers have to have superannuation for their employees. And employees have to withhold a minimum value of 10% of the employee’s wages as for their superannuation.

Fair trading including dispute resolution

· Fair Trading Act 1987

· The Competition and Consumer Act 2010

· Australian Consumer Law and Fair Trading Act 2012

· Building and Development Certifiers Act 2018

· Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 1999

For any dispute, its advice that building practitioner to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal in relation to the clients, or if a building practitioner could bring a fellow practitioner to the Victorian Building Authority for any related issues. Practitioners are advice to have keep any documentations relating to the project them involve in as evidence for the future.

Environmental management, sustainability and emergency responses

· Environment Protection Act 1986

· The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

Sample actions such as having a recycle skip for either Gypsum plasterboards or for Metal are some ways where a building practitioner can help to manage and limit the environment impact while in charge of a project. The failure to do so may result in heavy penalty.

Human resource management including employees and subcontractors

· Victoria Workers Compensation Act 1958

· Victoria’s Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004

· Fair Work Act 2009

· Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

· Privacy Act 1988

· Crimes Act 1958

· Equal Opportunity Act 2010

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013

· Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986

· Racial and Religious Tolerance Act 2001

· The Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995

· Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 2002

Rights such as mutual respect and cultural acceptance of different racial background are some basic rights for employees in a workplace setting. As no one should deserve unnecessary harassments or abuse due to any differences. Human Resource Management Plan will have necessary details to ensure a positive working environment.

Occupational health and safety, rehabilitation and return to work

· Occupation health and Safety Act 2004

· Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRC Act)

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013

· Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Regulation 2014

OH&S policies are in place to ensure that workplace setting is meeting the necessary safety and health standard to enhance the wellbeing of the individuals.

Noise abatement and working hours

· Environment Protection Act 2017

· Environment Protection Regulation 2021

· Fair Work Act 2009

Ensuring builder to follow local council noise management standard to avoid causing unnecessary disturbance to the neighbours in the surrounding environment.

a.











Discuss the options of using renewable materials over non-renewable materials and low energy materials over high energy materials where possible in order to meet the intent of the environmental legislation and the requirement of sustainability. You must outline at minimum the process of life cycle assessment for building materials and the concept of embodied energy.


We are traditionally used to using earth bricks, concrete, and wood in construction. For a better world, there are new processes, and sustainable as well as renewable materials alternatives that can be used in construction.

Embodied energy is the energy associated with the manufacturing of a product or services. The renewable materials is much more lower than non-renewable materials.

For timber, is first being growth in the forest and then being cut down and process in saw mill to be cut and stripped down in to varies shape and sizes depending on the needs of the design. However, no addition treatment and processed is needed much compared to manufacturing process of concrete.

It is also in recycling concrete is a cost effective and sustainable solution for your next project. Using recycled products can supplement traditional crushed rock and aggregates. The quality and performance of recycled crushed concrete is equivalent to virgin aggregate and in most cases more cost effective. It has been used successfully in pavement and road construction by many local councils throughout Australia.

The life cycle stages include: Material extraction, Transportation, Assembly, Construction, Operational Influence of the materials, Maintenance, and Disposal. Moreover the concept of embodied energy relates to a component of Life cycle assessment meaning it is the energy consumed by all of the processes associated with the production of a material throughout the manufacturing process.

What processes could a business use (including the policies, procedures and tools needed to support these) to ensure compliance with environmental protection legislation?


· Get an environmental audit

· An environmental audit can help to assess the nature and extent of your business’s current impacts on the environment. This will enable you to:

· identify how you could reduce your impact

· prioritise environmental management activities

· demonstrate your accountability to government, customers and shareholders.

· Set up an environmental management system

· Once you have an understanding of your current impact, an environmental management system (EMS) can help you to plan ahead to manage future impacts on the environment. An EMS can also make it easier to get certain permits for business activities.

Your EMS should: 

· identify the environmental impact of your business

· set your environmental objectives and targets

· provide your operational and emergency procedures for environmental issues

· outline responsibilities and your reporting structure

· identify areas for ongoing improvement.

· Report on your impacts

· It’s a good idea to regularly monitor and report on your impacts on the environment. Common environmental reports made by businesses include:

· greenhouse gas and energy reporting

· corporate sustainability or triple bottom line reporting

· natural resource management monitoring.




·

Check government requirements

· Australian, state and local governments jointly administer the environmental protection laws in Australia. Environmental laws that affect your business will depend on your business type. As a business owner, you need to understand which laws apply to your business and make sure you meet requirements.

· You may require environmental licences and permits for certain business activities.

b.








In regards to fair trading legislation, what are the key rights and obligations of consumers? How are these administered? Discuss the meaning of ‘implied warranties’ in this context.


Fair trading laws ensure that trading is fair for your business and your customers. The Competition and consumer act 2010 act broadly covers unfair market practices, industry codes, product safety and product labelling.

The law requires builders and tradespeople to honour warranties and:

· carry out the work in a proper and workmanlike manner, in accordance with the plans and specifications set out in the contract

· ensure all materials supplied by the builder are good and suitable for the purpose and are new, unless otherwise stated in the contract

· carry out the work in accordance with all laws and legal requirements, including the Building Act 1993

· carry out the work with reasonable care and skill and complete works by the date (or within the period) specified by the contract

· ensure new homes, extensions, renovations, repairs and kit homes are suitable for occupation when completed

· ensure other types of work and the material used are fit for the intended purpose.

Implied warranties apply to all building work. The Building Act 1993 allows action to be brought against a builder for up to 10 years from the date the work was completed. This right transfers to a new owner if the property is sold within this time. For more information, seek legal advice – including if the building work is older than 10 years.

Domestic building insurance protects consumers in the event that you die, become insolvent or disappear, and cannot finish the building project or fix defects. It covers costs up to $300,000 to fix structural defects for six years, and non-structural defects for two years.

c. In regards to taxation, GST, superannuation and insurance requirements, discuss the requirements of each of the key legislation and the options you have for complying with each. Include in your answer examples of the types of business processes required to support the requirements.

·

Taxation

In different level taxation requirement different.

In this business structure, the company:

· must apply for a tax file number (TFN) and use it when lodging its annual tax return

· is entitled to an Australian business number (ABN) if it is registered under the Corporations Act 2001. A company not registered under the Corporations law may register for an ABN if it is carrying on an enterprise in Australia

· must be registered for GST if its annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· owns the money that the business earns – the individuals who control the business cannot take money out of the business, except as a formal distribution of the profits or wages

· must lodge an annual company tax return

· usually pays its income tax by instalments through the pay as you go (PAYG) instalments system

· pays tax at the company tax rate or lower company tax rate (if a base rate entity)

· may be eligible for small business concessions

· must pay super guarantee contributions (SGC) for any eligible workers. This includes you, if you are a director of the company, and any other company directors.

As a sole trader, you:

· use your individual tax file number when lodging your income tax return

· report all your income in your individual tax return, using the section for business items to show your business income and expenses (there is no separate business tax return for sole traders)

· apply for an ABN and use your ABN for all your business dealings

· register for Goods and Services Tax (GST) if your annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· pay tax at the same income tax rates as individual taxpayers and you may be eligible for the small business tax offset

· put aside money to pay your income tax at the end of the financial year – usually, you will do this by paying quarterly Pay As You Go (PAYG) instalmentsclaim a deduction for any personal super contributions you make after notifying your fund.

In a partnership business structure:

· income, losses and control of the business are shared among the partners

· the partnership has its own TFN and must lodge an annual partnership return showing all income and deductions of the business

· the partnership doesn’t pay income tax on the profit it earns – each partner reports their share of the partnership income in their own tax return

· each partner pays tax on their share of the partnership profit at the individual tax rate and may be eligible for the small business tax offset

· the partnership must apply for an ABN and use it for all business dealings

· the partnership must be registered for GST if its annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more.

If you use a trust for your business structure, the trust:

· must have its own tax file number (TFN) for lodging its annual tax return

· must apply for an ABN and use it for all business dealings

· must be registered for GST if annual GST turnover is $75,000 or more

· may be liable to pay tax depending on the wording of its deed and whether any income the trust earns is distributed to its beneficiaries

· may be able to access small business tax concessions

· must pay super for any of its employees (this may include the trustee if they are also employed by the trust).

· GST

You must register for GST:

· when your business or enterprise has a GST turnover (gross income from all businesses minus GST) of $75,000 or more – see Working out your GST turnover

· when you start a new business and expect your turnover to reach the GST threshold (or more) in the first year of operation

· if you’re already in business and have reached the GST threshold

· if your non-profit organisation has a GST turnover of $150,000 per year or more

· when you provide taxi or limousine travel for passengers (including ride-sourcing) regardless of your GST turnover – this applies to both owner drivers and if you lease or rent a taxi

· if you want to claim fuel tax credits for your business or enterprise.

·

Superannuation

Superannuation, or ‘super’, is money put aside by your employer over your working life for you to live on when you retire from work.

Super is important for you, because the more you save, the more money you will have for your retirement.

You can only withdraw your super money in certain circumstances – for example, when you retire or turn 65 years old.

For most people, your employer pays money – ‘contributions’ – into a super account for you. This is called the ‘super guarantee’. They pay these contributions on top of your salary and wages. There are laws about how much super your employer must pay.

Generally, your employer must pay super for you if you are:

18 years old or over, and are paid $450 or more (before tax) in a calendar month

under 18 years old, being paid $450 or more (before tax) in a calendar month and work more than 30 hours in a week.

· Insurance

As a registered building practitioner, you must have the appropriate insurance for your registration category/class.

The VBA requires evidence that you have insurance or are eligible to purchase insurance (in some cases) before we can grant your application for registration or renew your registration. A company registered as a building practitioner must hold the required insurance in the company’s name.

If we learn that you are no longer covered by the required insurance, we must suspend your registration.

There are three types of insurance for registered building practitioners.

You need professional indemnity insurance for registration in any of the following building practitioner categories and classes:

· Building surveyor (unlimited)

· Building surveyor (limited)

· Building inspector (unlimited)

· Building inspector (limited)

· Building inspector (pool safety)

· Quantity surveyor

· Endorsed Building Engineer (civil, mechanical, electrical and fire safety classes)

· Draftsperson (building design) (architectural, interior and services classes).


https://www.vba.vic.gov.au/building/renewals-other-requirements/building-insurance-requirements

d.




In regards to OHS, welfare, workers’ compensation, noise abatement and working hours legislation and regulations, what are the requirements and how can you ensure your business complies?


· OHS


OHS requirements through safe work practices at any on or off-site construction workplace. It requires the performance of work in a safe manner through awareness of risks and work requirements, and the planning and performance of safe work practices with concern for personal safety and the safety of others. For achieve this part, we have to provide training a

Marketing homework help

SWOT Analysis Outline

Part 1: Company Summary

A. The summary should present a description of a company, its product/service, its target market and its need within that market. The summary should also present an overview of the main points of the analysis.

B. Outline the relationship between the organization’s mission, objectives, and strategy.

C. The summary should identify 3 problems or issues currently facing the company

Part 2: Situation Analysis

INTERNAL ANALYSIS

A. Describe the company’s current product(s) or service(s).

1. What are their sales in dollars?

2. What is their share of the market?

3. How do they compare to the competition?

4. Describe all major competitors and their products.

B. Analyze and describe the company’s internal strengths.

C. Analyze and describe the company’s internal weaknesses.

D. Analyze and describe the company’s potential opportunities.

E. Analyze and describe the company’s potential threats.

F. Describe how the company is performing the industry. (e.g., market shares, company resources, existing customers, etc).

EXTERNAL ANALYSIS (EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT)

A. Describe important external conditions and/or trends affecting the industry:

Social Legal/Regulatory

Technological Competitive

Economic Institutional

1. Is the size of the firms market increasing or decreasing and how quickly?

2. Why has the market remained stable or changed?

B. Do these conditions create opportunities for the firm or do these conditions pose threats?

Part 3: Recommendations

A. What are you recommendations to solve the issues outlined above based on your analysis?

B. What tool and or resources are necessary to implement your proposed recommendations.

C. What is the required budget and schedule for implementing these recommendations?

D. How will you monitor and track the progress related to these recommendations?

E. What are you contingency plans if these recommendations prove not to be working?

Part 4: Conclusion

A. Why was your analysis important?

B. How will this analysis improved on the issues identified?

C. What steps can be taken to insure that similar issues don’t develop in the future?

Your paper must be submitted in APA format with a cover page and references.

Power Points

A. The PowerPoint presentation should be at least 12 slides in length.

B. Slide will be evaluated based on readability, aesthetics, and analysis overview.

ALTERNATIVE OUTLINE

Company History

Market Position Strategy

Product or Service Advantages

Targeted Customers

Top Competitors

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunity

Threats & Trends

Strategic Recommendations

Conclusions

Marketing homework help

1

BIHI Supply Co. Social Media Marketing Plan

Executive Summary

The marketing plan discusses the goals and advantages for the Company’s social media

marketing. The plan outlines the research on the audience, target information and the channels

used to reach the audience.

According to the company estimates, it has a market share of 0.5% for retail sales. The gross

revenue stands at $17 million and has a year end goal of $19 million and 0.7% market share.

This will be achieved by increasing the number of visitors to the company website by use of

social media sites such s Instagram, Facebook and twitter. There is need to increase

engagement and conversations on these sites to reach the 12% target.

Through social media marketing, we can connect the audience and engage in the customer

conversation while sharing engaging content. Our target audience is the young people or

millennials who are constantly on social sites. Most of them are aspiring students or travelers.

Other individuals may not meet the above description but are ready customers for our products

for instance parents who buy school outfitters such as bags.

Our company creates durable, elegant and affordable bags as its name suggests. The marketing

plan will help the company to meet its social media goals of engagement and increasing

revenue and sales.

Goals

To meet the design needs of our customers while maintaining affordable costs and sell at

competitive prices to maintain profits. It will be achieved by creating an online brand awareness

through social media marketing to increase the number of followers through creation of

relevant content to target markets.

The strategy will use Instagram as an audience engagement platform to post at least two posts

a day. Millennials are more connected on Instagram than Facebook. The sites allow the

2

audience to like, share or comment on the products thus creating awareness. The older audience

can also be engaged on Facebook with a similar strategy.

Hashtags will be created to enhance quality and experience of the customers. More engaging

content with educational information helps sell the product through attention and creation of

interest.

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

 A design focused or motivated audience

 Millennial targeted market audience

Weaknesses

 Lack of engaged followers

 Non-consistent posting

 Insufficient engaging content

Opportunities

 Prospecting partnerships or new markets

 Social media outreach through influencers

Threats

 Changes in customer needs

 Increased competition

Analysis of Content

The analysis of the market social media strategies reveals that Buhi Co. has a lot to offer in

terms of quality, promotion and more engaging or better content to reach the audience.

Different platforms require unique content for specific audiences. Instagram audience is more

engaged with the product while the Facebook audience require photos and influencers. One

striking thing about Facebook is the constant negative comments on customer service and the

3

product. It is important for us to creating educational content as well as listen to customer needs

for improvement.

Facebook audience reactions are about likes, shares and comments mostly on blog posts where

people request to buy or simply enjoy learning new things about the products. The Facebook

page has more average engagement. Weekends especially Sundays have the highest

engagement while weekdays such as Thursdays and Fridays have the most shares and

comments. The best timing for most posts is during lunch breaks and evening when people are

mostly free.

Instagram reaches more people with a higher engagement. The audience is mainly interested

in images that are interesting with an intention to purchase. Influencers’ posts have the highest

likes and comments. Therefore, paid content reaches a wider audience.

Analysis of the Target Audience

Our market segments have core target audience of ages between 16 to 28 years. The majority

are male at the Day packer Tom but our target is overall regardless of the audience. This market

segment is about 30% of the market share. It has an estimated income of between $15,000 to

$30,000. The back-to-school target market interests are majorly fashion, bags, style, comfort,

class, black, school supplies and college among others. The city hopper market includes those

that are planning vacations and need fashion and travel bags that are practical. They are about

10% of the market share with ages of 17 to 35 and are mostly female. The income potential is

between $30,000 to 50,000. They are mostly interested in back packs, vacation, exploration,

travel, urban, luggage, adventure, transportation, air travel and packaging among others. Other

markets include those looking for multipurpose bags for their next trip to friends composing of

about 30% share of the market. Those that are starting junior high school with a market

potential of about 5% with revenue income of about $80,000.

Social Media Strategy

4

Instagram

#Feel sorted on your adventure #live your life with Buhi. Offer, get 20% discount on our new

bags

Facebook

Summer is here with us. Click on the link to find our collection of bags that will suit your

needs. Free shipment to your place.

Instagram Strategy

Our main focus will be on Instagram because of our interest on millennials and outdoor

photos.it is a popular platform among these age groups. Quality photography is the most liked

5

content on Instagram. The audience will respond more on images with nature, cities and

countries because of the need to travel.

Facebook strategy

Our target audience on Facebook is mature and older with a professional taste. It is a diverse

platform that will allow us to reach all the audience. However, Facebook is sometimes

expensive in promoting content.

Conclusion

The social media marketing plan is a major goal for the company in its ability to grow the brand

awareness and increase engagement. This is possible through numerous likes, comments and

shares of our products. It will help increase sales and revenue of the company.

Marketing homework help


Marketing Plan Topic Selection*

MKTU 605: Week 1 Assignment and Rubric

Length: 2 Pages, plus the annotated bibliography

Due: Sunday of Week 1, by 11:59 pm

Value: 100 Points





Read the rubrics below to develop the scope of work.






Select a topic for the marketing plan you will develop throughout the term. It must be a single product or service, not a system or process. Research your concept before you finalize your choice; be sure you can find adequate data to inform a marketing plan. Look for data about customers, markets, competitors, and distribution channels.






Next, write an annotated bibliography that includes at least ten references to support your choice. Add the annotated bibliography to the end of your paper. See the rubric for more information.






When you write your paper, address the following questions, in detail:






1. What is the problem/need the product/service solves or addresses?






2. Who is the customer, in demographic terms? Be specific.






3. What is the customer’s psychographic? Be specific.






4. Where is the customer located — what is the geography? Pick a place, be very specific, by zip code so that you can easily pull data. If you go wide, like a region, a state, a county, a country, you must pull data for this entire area. Drilling down into zip code, or even a neighborhood within that zip code is preferable.






5. Describe the 5 Ps (product, place, promotion, price, people) at a high level. You will further develop the marketing mix later in the term, but you need a sense of how this will look before you proceed.






6. Did you find adequate data to inform your annotated bibliography? If not, rethink your topic. You must have at least ten examples of solid data that proves your topic is viable for market planning in your annotated bibliography.






7. How is your product or service innovative? What does it do that makes it innovative? Note: your product or service must be an innovation or a major improvement of something that already exists.






This assignment is due by Sunday of week 1 at 11:59 pm.






























*This assignment “formalizes” your topic selection. Use what you learned from the discussion and your meeting with the professor to develop this assignment. It is not plagiarism to repurpose the discussion because the assignment was designed to leverage the discussion.







Rubric: Evaluation Criteria

Grading Elements

Exemplary

Proficient

Developing

Emerging

Product or

Service

Description

20 –18

Clearly and concisely describes the product/service of the proposed marketing plan and the problem or need it addresses and how it is innovative.

17-14

Fairly clearly describes the type of product/service of the proposed marketing plan and the problem or need it addresses and how it is innovative.

13 – 11

Describes the product/service of the proposed marketing plan and the problem or need it addresses, and how it is innovative.

10 – 0

Vaguely describes the product/service of the proposed marketing plan and the problem or need it addresses, and how it is innovative, if at all.

Demographic,

Psychographic,

Geographic

Description

20-18

Clearly and concisely describes the demographic, psychographic, and geographic features of the target customer.

17-14

Fairly clearly describes the demographic, psychographic, and geographic features of the target customer.

13-11

Describes some of the demographic, psychographic, and geographic features of the target customer.

10 – 0

Vaguely describes some elements of the demographic, psychographic, and geographic features of the target customer.

Description of

the Marketing

Mix

20-18

Clearly and concisely describes the preliminary marketing mix. Includes all five Ps.

17-14

Fairly clearly describes the preliminary marketing mix. Includes all five Ps.

13-11

Describes parts of the preliminary marketing mix. Includes four Ps.

10 – 0

Vaguely describes some elements of the preliminary marketing mix. Includes 3 or fewer Ps.

Annotated

Bibliography

20-18

Lists at least ten references in an annotated bibliography, annotation shows careful reading and a clear understanding of source content, quality, and relevance. Adds the annotated bibliography to the end of the paper.

17-14

Lists at least eight references in an annotated bibliography, annotation shows reading and understanding of source content, quality, and relevance. Adds the annotated bibliography to the end of the paper.

13-11

Lists at least five references in an annotated bibliography, annotation shows reading and understanding of source content, quality, and relevance, with weaknesses or omissions in no more than one or two entries.

The annotated bibliography is not added to the end of the paper.

10 – 0

Lists three or fewer references in an annotated bibliography, annotation shows superficial or no reading and understanding of source content, quality, and relevance, with weaknesses or omissions in most entries.

The annotated bibliography is attached as a separate document.

Writing

Mechanics and

APA

20-18

The paper is logical, well-written, and the required length. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation are accurate. The Paper is APA formatted.

Consistently embeds sources to the content to support discussion and analysis.Uses section headers aligned to rubric grading elements.

17-14

The paper is logical, well-written, and is the required length. Minor errors in spelling, grammar, and/or punctuation. The Paper is APA formatted.

Embeds sources to the content to support discussion and analysis. Some sections seem out of place and/or some section headers may be missing.

13-11

The paper is logical, well-written, and is the required length. Minor errors in spelling, grammar, and/or punctuation. The paper is somewhat APA formatted.

Embeds sources to the content to support discussion and analysis. Some sections seem out of place and/or some section headers may be missing.

10 – 0

The paper lacks clarity, might be confusing, too long, or too short. Paper is not APA formatted.

Numerous errors in spelling, grammar, and/or punctuation.

Limited, if any, use of sources to support discussion and analysis.

There are no section headers.

MKTU 605 Rubric Week 1 Assignment Page of 2 02/2020

Marketing homework help

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 1

King County: A Case Study Model for Strategic Marketing

Planning for Airport Managers

William Rankin
University of Central Missouri

Abstract

Marketing planning in an airport as with other organizations is all about selecting
appropriate target groups and formulating a marketing mix to achieve marketing objectives and
financial targets. However, the factors which need to be considered in the dynamic and ever
changing airport industry means that airport marketing planning is more than just applying
general theory to practice. Therefore, this paper considers the unique case of airports and goes
through the modern day planning process using the example of King County International
Airport. It starts by considering the mission, value and vision statements to establish where the
airport wants to be and looks at the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to
assess where the airport is now. This leads to an evaluation of the marketing strategies which
should be adopted.

Keywords: Airport Management, Airport Marketing, Strategic Planning, Marketing Management
Airport Decision Making

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 2

Introduction

Marketing planning case studies help airport managers prepare for real-world problems,

situations and crises by providing an approximation of various marketing environments. Thus,
through the examination of specific marketing cases, airport managers are given the opportunity
to work issues through the trials, tribulations, experiences, and research findings of other
marketing professionals. An obvious advantage to this mode of marketing planning is that it
allows airport managers the exposure to settings and contexts that they might not otherwise
experience. One way to study airport marketing issues is through the use of strategic marketing
planning case studies. Strategic marketing planning is a process of developing a map or route an
airport will follow which identifies what products are to be provided to which customers, where
they will be provided, and at what price. Based on the vision and mission statements, an airport
strategic marketing planning summarizes the basic operational tasks, goals, objectives, strategies,
and tactics for the airport organization (Quilty, 1999; Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

The mission need not be measurable, but it is something the airport employees can work
toward regardless of intermediate achievements. Compared to mission, objectives imply a
shorter, measurable time period with an accomplishment that can be measured in numerical
terms. For example, an objective might be to achieve 90% hangar utilization within 2 years
(Quilty, 1999). A strategy is a major course of action and implies a relatively longer time span
than tactics. A strategy is what one is going to do and not how the airport is going to do it. A
tactic, on the other hand is how the airport is going to achieve the strategy and the ultimate goal.
It is a series of shorter action items that are part of the strategy. “Michael Porter, a management
scholar, has identified three classes of competitive advantage strategies. The classes are known
as low-cost producer, differentiation, and focus” (Quilty, 1999, p. 21).

The low-cost producer attempts to hold prices low by minimizing costs. These efforts
may take the form of efficient scale of production facilities, product design, distribution
channels, raw materials procurement, etc. Part of this strategy can involve selling in volume so
that low profits per unit may be offset. This strategy is observed in air carriers such as
Southwest™ Airlines, but it is also practiced in general aviation fuel marketing, at airports
attempting to buy large amounts of chemicals or sand for winter use, and in the air cargo industry
(Quilty, 1999).

Differentiation strategy involves creating a unique image of the organization’s product or
service so that customers may be charged for that uniqueness. Companies that employ this
strategy stress high quality, image, or technological leadership, among other possibilities.
“Milwaukee International Airport has long stressed its airport as an alternative to Chicago’s
O’Hare International Airport, while many general aviation airports stress their ease of use and
access to important business and commercial centers or recreation areas” (Quilty, 1999, pp. 21-
22). Differentiation strategy can be viewed between Federal Express and United Parcel Service,
and between United Airlines and American Airlines.

A focus strategy typically targets a segment of a larger market and specializes in a
particular geographic location or customer group. The focused approach attempts to serve the
targeted needs so well that competitors are left with no opening to gain market share. An
example is a fixed base operator (FBO) that specializes in specialized maintenance to the point
where other FBOs in the area would not find it feasible to establish such a service (Quilty, 1999;
Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

The concept of competitive advantage causes airport managers to focus on meeting and

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 3

anticipating the expectations of airport customers by comparing their airport’s performance to
other airports or to other transportation modes. It requires an understanding of the competition’s
strengths and weaknesses through and benchmark analysis. It can also be used to assess how
related businesses located on the airport may respond or pursue their business activity (Quilty,
1999; Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

In addition to pursuing competitive advantage, an airport may attempt to occupy a special
niche in the environment that is unique to its capabilities, or which offers an opportunity
overlooked by competitors. The strategy in this case is to occupy the niche and then erect
barriers that prevent other organizations from challenging the unique position. Airlines and
airport service companies often attempt to use this strategy (Quilty, 1999; Pearce and Robinson,
2005).

Marketing Objectives

Marketing objectives are time bound statements of intended future results and general
and continuing statements of intended future results. For purposes of this paper, the marketing
objectives for the King County International Airport (KCIA)* are as follows:

1. Identify those elements of the strategic marketing management process that

precede strategic decision-making at the KCIA.
2. Identify and address the products and services that exist at KCIA.
3. Identify and address the customers and markets that exist at KCIA.
4. Identify and address the competitive advantages of KCIA.
5. Identify and address what product and market emphasis KCIA should pursue.
6. Identify the strategy or strategies that KCIA should implement and pursue.

*Note: KCIA is not the official airport identifier; it is generally only used in promotional
material. The proper identifier is IATA: BFI, ICAO: KBFI.

The History of King County International Airport

According to King County (2004), in 1928 King County voters approved a $1 million
plan to build the region’s first public airport. Today, the airport is one of the busiest airports in
the nation and ranks as one of the most successful public investments in Washington State. The
airport was named after the founder of the Boeing Aircraft Company, William E. Boeing, and the
airport helped to foster the growth of the Boeing Company throughout the 1930s. It served as the
regional center for commercial and recreational aviation in the Seattle area during this era (King
County Airport Division, 2002).

Just one day prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the airport was taken over by the
federal government due to its strategic location and its importance as a Boeing production center.
During the World War II era, the airport was devoted to the production of the B-17 and the B-29
bombers, which played key roles in the European and Pacific theaters. After the war years, the
airport served as the primary passenger airport in the region until the construction and
completion of Sea-Tac International Airport in the early 1950s (King County Airport Division,
2002).

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 4

Today, King County International Airport (KCIA) is one of the busiest airports in the
nation, serving more than 375,000 aircraft operations per year by recreational, corporate,
military, and Boeing jet aircraft. The airport continues to provide limited passenger service and is
the primary air cargo airport in the region. The airport is owned and operated by the King County
Department of Transportation, Airport Division, and receives no general tax revenues to support
its operations. The airport is the site for the final production and delivery of the Boeing 737 and
757 aircraft, and a testing center for the Boeing 777 and military AWACS program. See
Appendix A for the facilities layout of KCIA (King County Airport Division, 2002).

Mission, Values, and Vision Statements

The mission, values, and vision statements of the King County International Airport are
as follows:

Mission Statement

The mission of the King County International Airport is to support the economic vitality
of the county, to support the national air transportation system, to encourage advanced
technology, to provide safe and continuous general aviation airport services to King
County businesses and residents and to serve as the gateway to the county. In fulfilling
this mission, the Airport will be a good neighbor and environmental steward and will
provide quality facilities to Airport tenants and operators in an efficient, environmentally
safe and fiscally prudent manner. (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Values Statement

The values of KCIA are:
1. Safety is crucial
2. Economic vitality, responsiveness to the area economy
3. Looking to the future
4. Environmentally sound
5. Collaborative in community
6. Innovative
7. National leader
8. Support state-of-the-art manufacturing (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Vision Statement

By the year 2018, the King County International Airport will be a national leader
developing partnerships with the King County community, businesses and residents to
provide airport facilities and services which are environmentally and economically sound
and ensure the community’s well being. Today:

1. KCIA strives to be the best airport in the country and serves its aviation customers
well.

2. KCIA strives for excellent relationships with the community. There will be
mutual respect between the airport and the community, even when the community
does not like the impacts of airport operations.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 5

3. KCIA strives to be an excellent County agency, highly regarded by County
officials (elected and appointed) as being reliable, efficient, effective, and
responsive.

4. KCIA is a great place to work. Employees are valued, recognized, trained and
have a great time. (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Problem Statement

To achieve the mission, values and vision of King County International Airport, the
County must adopt a sound strategic marketing management plan and implement specific
strategies for success. What are the appropriate strategies to implement? In strategic marketing
management, one way to assess the airport marketing environment is through strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis.

Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities and Threats Analysis

According to Pearce and Robinson (2000), SWOT is an acronym for the strengths and
weaknesses of an organization and the environmental opportunities and threats that an
organization faces. The analysis is based on the assumption that an effective strategy evolves
from a sound fit between the organization’s internal resources and the organization’s external
realities, or situation, as follows:

1. A strength is a resource advantage relative to its position or situation and the
needs of the community it serves.

2. A weakness is a limitation or deficiency in one or more of the organization’s
realities or situation that impedes it full potential or effectiveness.

3. An opportunity is a major favorable reality in the organization’s environment.
Key trends, for example, are one source of opportunities.

4. A threat is a major unfavorable reality in an organization’s environment. Threats
are impediments to the organization’s desired reality or position. (pp. 191-221)

SWOT analyses are used in many ways to aid strategy makers. One of the most common
ways is to use it as a framework to guide systematic development of the organization’s resources
based on the alternatives available to the organization. SWOT analyses are a framework of
choice among many strategy makers because of its simplicity of sound strategy formulation –
matching an organization’s opportunities and threats with its strengths and weaknesses (Pearce
and Robinson, 2005).

KCIA SWOT Analysis

Review of the Airport Manager Candidate Information Materials from King County

(2002), revealed the following SWOT analysis:

Strengths

1. KCIA serves a diverse set of clients, ranging from private pilots to large corporate
aircraft operations, as well as government organizations, retailers, wholesalers,
and a variety of other services. Boeing Aircraft Company maintains a significant
production facility at the airport.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 6

2. KCIA generates more than 10,000 jobs in the County and is responsible for $1.6
billion in sales by airport tenants. The airport supports the earning of $0.5 billion
in labor income per year. Finally, $39 million in state and local taxes are
generated by the airport each year.

3. With approximately 150 businesses based at KCIA, including air cargo
companies, flight schools, charter operations, and helicopter operations, most
business activity at KCIA is sold outside the county economy. Approximately
82% of the gross volumes of sales at the airport are represented as new money to
the County economy. This activity would not be present in King County without
KCIA.

4. With two runways (3,710 and 10,001feet in length) and four fixed base operators,
KCIA provides all the facilities necessary to support jet and piston driven aircraft
and helicopter activity. KCIA is also an FAA-designated General Aviation
Reliever Airport for Sea-Tac International Airport, making the airport eligible for
FAA reliever airport grant funding.

Weaknesses

1. In recent years, most of the KCIA tenants have experienced a downturn in
business, which is strongly related to the national economy and the events of
September 11, 2001. Activities at the Boeing production facility have also
declined somewhat in the last few years. This is partly attributable to the cessation
of B757 production in Renton.

2. Slow recovery of the local economy, increased federal security requirements,
potential competition from Sea-Tac International and Paine Field airports for air
cargo and aviation industrial activity, could result in inadequate landing and fuel
flowage fees to support airport operations and capital investments.

3. Aircraft operations at KCIA have severe noise impacts on the community. The
airspace of KCIA, Sea-Tac International, and Renton airports intersects, forcing
cargo aircraft to fly lower than they would normally have to on approach to
KCIA. Also, the County has no jurisdiction over aircraft once they are airborne;
the FAA is responsible for the safe and efficient use of the national airspace in the
region.

4. The Airport Police/Aircraft Firefighting is managed and operated by the King
County Sheriff’s Department as a contract service to KCIA. In addition to these
duties they are also responsible for the Runway Safety Inspection Program,
wildlife control, ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections,
as well as building inspections. KCIA is paying a premium for these services. Of
the current $5 million annual operating budget, KCIA is paying the King County
Sheriff’s Department more than $2 million annually.

5. KCIA has finite land resources. The airport has a total of 594 acres available for
aeronautical development — see Appendix A.

6. KCIA also lies in an area often affected by low visibility and is not serviced by an
instrument approach allowing operations below a visual range of one mile.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 7

Opportunities

1. KCIA has a strong demand for available airfield land and facilities. At the same
time lease revenues appear to be stabilizing with the Boeing Company generating
$2.7 million annually. Other lease revenues indicate a modest growth while lease
rates are adjusted on a three year appraisal cycle.

2. KCIA has a master plan and financial program which outlines a schedule for
runway improvements, taxiway improvements, and environmental mitigation in
support of aviation users, industry, and the community.

3. KCIA owns and manages 10 buildings located on airport property that generate
26% of the airports annual income. These buildings are leased primarily to state
and local governmental agencies. New lease and air service opportunities exist
with the remodeling of the main terminal building completed just last year (see
Figure 1).

12% 7%

4%

77%

Fuel Flowage

Aircraft Parking

Landing Fees

Land and Facility

Rent

Figure 1. KCIA Annual Airport Revenue by Cost Centers (King County
Airport Division, 2002).

4. Taking back control over the Runway Safety Inspection Program, wildlife control,
ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections, as well as
building inspections offers opportunities to reduce expenses (see Figure 2).

Figure 2. KCIA Annual Expenses by Cost Centers (King County Airport
Division, 2002).

5. KCIA has instituted a noise monitoring and flight tracking system, a Federal
Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 150 Noise and Land Use Compatibility Program,
and a Fly Quite Program aimed at reducing noise in the surrounding

18%

19%

24%

39%

County Overhead

Charges

Services and

Other Charges

Sheriff Contract

Salaries and

Wages

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 8

communities. By partnering with local residents the airport will gain the support
of the local community, which offers opportunities for continued growth and
development, as well as retention of existing businesses.

6. KCIA has instituted a community outreach program called Roundtable.
Roundtable was set up as an advisory board to make recommendations to airport
officials, the County Executive, and County Council on issues of importance
about KCIA to the community.

7. Opportunity Skyway, another outreach program, supports KCIA’s efforts to foster
good relations with nearby communities. It also serves Federal Aviation
Administration goals to support and promote aviation education. The program is
an airport based education program that uses aviation to promote academic and
vocational learning while encouraging career exploration in aviation related
industries. The program was initiated by King Council action in 1996 pursuant to
county government policies that encourage county departments to support
education and regional workforce development.

8. KCIA is also the location of a number of other business activities. Some of these
are located on the west side of the airport, while others are located on the east side
of the airport. They are extremely diverse in their nature. These businesses
include Boeing’s Museum of Flight at the southwest corner of the field. Although
technically, Boeing’s Museum of Flight is not an airport tenant, KCIA staff and
the museum consider themselves part of the airport family. Several producer
service businesses with no relationship to the airport simply rent office space
through KCI tenants. The opportunity to lease more space to these types of
tenants is a possibility.

Threats

1. The single largest threat to KCIA is that Boeing is exploring possible moves to
Wichita, Tulsa, St. Louis, Long Beach and overseas, and will continue doing so
for the foreseeable future.

2. Any recession to the local economy continues to be a threat to KCIA.
3. Increased homeland security constraints.
4. Loss of 100 octane aviation gas due to EPA concerns.

Strategy Considerations and Recommendations

The following strategy considerations and recommendations should be considered for
KCIA:

1. Complete planned capital investments in support of aviation users, industry, and
community,

2. Take back control over the Runway Safety Inspection Program, wildlife control,
ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections, as well as
building inspections.

3. Develop an airport business plan to support initiatives and investments of KCIA.
4. Develop an airport marketing plan to support the initiatives and investments of

KCIA.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 9

5. Improve airport information sharing between KCIA, Paine, Renton, and Sea-Tac
International airports.

6. Maintain participation with the business community and the Roundtable advisory
board.

7. Leverage location, marketplace, and resources to achieve maximum efficiencies
with regard to field capacity, the Boeing Company, industrial land and cargo
development.

8. Support regional economic strategies.
9. Be a good neighbor to the surrounding communities.
10. Market KCIA as a full service general aviation airport.
11. Market KCIA as a reliever airport for Sea-Tac International Airport.
12. Market KCIA as a major air cargo facility.

Concluding Remarks

As one of the busiest general aviation and reliever airports in the country, KCIA plays a
key role in the regions vitality. Like all airports, KCIA has its strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats that, if properly managed, will continue to propel economic growth in
the Puget Sound region for years to come. To assist airport managers in the facilitation of a
SWOT analysis, a facilitation guide and suggested outcomes for the KCIA strategic marketing
planning case study model are attached as Appendix B.

References

King County (2004). King county international airport. Retrieved September 28, 2004, from

http://www.metroke.gov/airport
King County Airport Division (2002). Airport manager candidate information materials. : King

County, WA.
Quilty, S. M. (1999). The management functions. Washington, DC: American Association of

Airport Executives.
Pearce II, J. A., & Robinson Jr., R. B. (2000). Strategic management (7th ed.). : McGraw-Hill,

NY.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 10

Appendix A
KCIA Facilities Layout Diagram

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 11

Appendix B
Suggested Outcomes and Facilitation Guide

Marketing Questions
According to Quilty (1999), airport marketing planners should ask the following
questions in preparation of strategic marketing management plans:

1. Questions that precede strategic decision making:
a. What values are going to guide the airport business?
b. How far down the road should the airport look?
c. What assumptions about the external environment underpin the airport’s

strategy (regulation, the economy, resource availability, technology,
competition, and the market)?

2. Questions that address products and services:
a. What existing and new products and services can the airport offer or not offer?
b. What criteria can the airport use to evaluate a new product or service

opportunities?
3. Questions that address customers and markets:

a. What existing and new customer groups can the airport serve or not serve?
b. What criteria will the airport use to evaluate a new market opportunity?

4. Questions that address competitive advantages:
a. What factors (price and/or the various dimensions of quality) are meaningful to

the airport’s customers?
b. Which factors can represent an airport’s competitive advantage?

5. Questions that address product and market emphasis:
a. In which of our current product or market areas should the airport place its

greatest emphasis (resources and attention)?
b. In what new product or market areas should the airport place its greatest

emphasis?
6. Questions that address strategy implementation:

a. What financial and non-financial measures can the airport use to assess the
viability of the strategy?

b. What strategy should the airport implement to ensure that departmental goals,
process goals, position and people goals, organizational design and
management support the mission of KCIA?

Facilitation Guide

This guide provides a suggested approach to facilitating both the content areas and the
marketing scenarios in the King County International Airport Case Study. It has been developed
to be used for all marketing modalities.

Decision-Making Facilitation Approach to Strategy Marketing Development and
Implementation

A problem solving model is suggested for making key decisions to be used by strategic
marketing planners after a SWOT is performed. A suggested decision making model shown in
the diagram below:

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 12

Figure 1. Problem solving model.

Airport managers need to understand that the strategic marketing planning begins with an
understanding and recognition of the systems and constituencies within which an airport
operates. They should learn that a strategic marketing plan is a disciplined effort to produce
fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an airport is, what an airport does,
and why an airport does it does (Quilty, 1999).

Among the considerations of strategic marketing planning are the development of a
vision and mission statement, organizational objectives, and marketing strategies to carry out the
objectives. Airport managers need to know that top airport management is responsible for
formulating a vision or future course of action for the organization. Plans and objectives derived
from the vision and mission statement provide a purpose and a direction to the organization. It is
important that airport managers begin to recognize that the marketing planning process is a
continuous and not a one time event. Proper strategic marketing planning, as it relates to overall
organizational goals, involves a number of steps. Those steps involve (a) developing vision and
mission statements; (b) identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT); (c)
developing a strategic marketing plan and tactical and operational plans; (d) making, buying or
otherwise obtaining necessary resources; (e) implementing the strategic marketing plan; (f) and
then evaluating and revising the plan as necessary or required.

Finally, airport managers need to understanding that having a strategy is only half of the
strategic marketing planning process. Implementing the strategy is the determinate of its success.
Once strategies have been selected, decisions must be made regarding the best organizational
structure for implementing the strategies. Generally speaking, the simpler the airports structure
the better. However, the more significant the modification, change, or expansion in the product,
service, customer, or geographic area is, the more the organizational structure may need to be
modified. A tactical plan can help the implementation process. Tactical plans encompass a short
time span, generally one year, and are more detailed than strategic plans. A tactical plan is
oriented toward the means of attaining goals, whereas a strategic plan is oriented toward the
objectives and goals themselves. These points should be emphasized throughout the facilitation
of this case study.
Suggested Outcomes

Airport marketing planners should ask the following questions in preparation of strategic

The situation provides the venue in which to identify the SWOT issues

1. Define the situation 2. Frame the correct
issues

3. Define the end-state
goals

4. Identify the
alternative strategies

7. Make the
decision(s)

8. Implement the
strategy

9. Evaluate results and
take corrective actions

5. Evaluate the
alternatives

6. Assess risks

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 13

marketing plans:
1. Questions that precede strategic marketing decision making:

a. What values are going to guide the airport business? The most
successful marketing strategies are those consistent with the airport culture
that exists. If not, then the culture must be changed in some way to be
consistent with the airport culture which exists. Organizational culture is
the shared values of the organization.

b. How far down the road should the airport look? Milestones should be
evaluated on a yearly basis. Rarely are strategic plan accurate more than
five years into the future. Annual or semi-annual reevaluation is
recommended.

c. What assumptions about the external marketing environment underpin the
airport’s marketing strategy (regulation, the economy, resource
availability, technology, competition, and the market)? Assumptions and
beliefs shape the way things are done in the organization. Environmental
scanning is important element in making assumptions for future decisions.

2. Questions that address products and services:
a. What existing and new products and services will the airport offer or not

offer? Products and services can include best practices in the areas of
customer service, ground transportation, facilities and maintenance,
technology, etc.

b. What criteria will the airport use to evaluate a new product or service
opportunity? Studying and measuring other organizations, including those
outside airports, that demonstrate world class performance is an important
tool – benchmarking.

3. Questions that address customers and markets:
a. In addition to identifying new customers, what existing and new customer

groups will the airport serve or not serve? Social responsibility plays a part
here. This may inc

Marketing homework help

Your Ideal Social Media Team

Imagine you are a manager at an organization that did not currently have any in-house social media staffing and did not engage in any outside sources or consulting. You have now been tasked to build a social media team/department. Describe what your recommendations for the roles, staffing, tools, policies, etc. to run and manage social media for the organization.

If it helps you to provide context of the size of the organization (e.g.: small non-profit vs. large corporation), you may state a general size of the company or use one of your organizations; however, this assignment is to reflect YOUR THOUGHTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, NOT REPORT WHAT A NAMED COMPANY IS CURRENTLY DOING.

You also do not have to worry about providing any kind of budget or cost numbers; but remember the size/roles of the team typically has a relationship to the kind and size of organization.

A few thought-starters (you may or may not choose to use this list):

· What roles would you hire? What would be the responsibilities for each (high-level)?

· What tools and other resources would you desire? Provide a description of why you would need them, and the tasks the tools would be used for.

· What types of rules and policies would you recommend the organization put in place?

· Would you outsource any activities or roles? Why or why not?

Assignment must be minimum of 600 words. (APA format)

Marketing homework help

1

BIHI Supply Co. Social Media Marketing Plan

Executive Summary

The marketing plan discusses the goals and advantages for the Company’s social media

marketing. The plan outlines the research on the audience, target information and the channels

used to reach the audience.

According to the company estimates, it has a market share of 0.5% for retail sales. The gross

revenue stands at $17 million and has a year end goal of $19 million and 0.7% market share.

This will be achieved by increasing the number of visitors to the company website by use of

social media sites such s Instagram, Facebook and twitter. There is need to increase

engagement and conversations on these sites to reach the 12% target.

Through social media marketing, we can connect the audience and engage in the customer

conversation while sharing engaging content. Our target audience is the young people or

millennials who are constantly on social sites. Most of them are aspiring students or travelers.

Other individuals may not meet the above description but are ready customers for our products

for instance parents who buy school outfitters such as bags.

Our company creates durable, elegant and affordable bags as its name suggests. The marketing

plan will help the company to meet its social media goals of engagement and increasing

revenue and sales.

Goals

To meet the design needs of our customers while maintaining affordable costs and sell at

competitive prices to maintain profits. It will be achieved by creating an online brand awareness

through social media marketing to increase the number of followers through creation of

relevant content to target markets.

The strategy will use Instagram as an audience engagement platform to post at least two posts

a day. Millennials are more connected on Instagram than Facebook. The sites allow the

2

audience to like, share or comment on the products thus creating awareness. The older audience

can also be engaged on Facebook with a similar strategy.

Hashtags will be created to enhance quality and experience of the customers. More engaging

content with educational information helps sell the product through attention and creation of

interest.

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

 A design focused or motivated audience

 Millennial targeted market audience

Weaknesses

 Lack of engaged followers

 Non-consistent posting

 Insufficient engaging content

Opportunities

 Prospecting partnerships or new markets

 Social media outreach through influencers

Threats

 Changes in customer needs

 Increased competition

Analysis of Content

The analysis of the market social media strategies reveals that Buhi Co. has a lot to offer in

terms of quality, promotion and more engaging or better content to reach the audience.

Different platforms require unique content for specific audiences. Instagram audience is more

engaged with the product while the Facebook audience require photos and influencers. One

striking thing about Facebook is the constant negative comments on customer service and the

3

product. It is important for us to creating educational content as well as listen to customer needs

for improvement.

Facebook audience reactions are about likes, shares and comments mostly on blog posts where

people request to buy or simply enjoy learning new things about the products. The Facebook

page has more average engagement. Weekends especially Sundays have the highest

engagement while weekdays such as Thursdays and Fridays have the most shares and

comments. The best timing for most posts is during lunch breaks and evening when people are

mostly free.

Instagram reaches more people with a higher engagement. The audience is mainly interested

in images that are interesting with an intention to purchase. Influencers’ posts have the highest

likes and comments. Therefore, paid content reaches a wider audience.

Analysis of the Target Audience

Our market segments have core target audience of ages between 16 to 28 years. The majority

are male at the Day packer Tom but our target is overall regardless of the audience. This market

segment is about 30% of the market share. It has an estimated income of between $15,000 to

$30,000. The back-to-school target market interests are majorly fashion, bags, style, comfort,

class, black, school supplies and college among others. The city hopper market includes those

that are planning vacations and need fashion and travel bags that are practical. They are about

10% of the market share with ages of 17 to 35 and are mostly female. The income potential is

between $30,000 to 50,000. They are mostly interested in back packs, vacation, exploration,

travel, urban, luggage, adventure, transportation, air travel and packaging among others. Other

markets include those looking for multipurpose bags for their next trip to friends composing of

about 30% share of the market. Those that are starting junior high school with a market

potential of about 5% with revenue income of about $80,000.

Social Media Strategy

4

Instagram

#Feel sorted on your adventure #live your life with Buhi. Offer, get 20% discount on our new

bags

Facebook

Summer is here with us. Click on the link to find our collection of bags that will suit your

needs. Free shipment to your place.

Instagram Strategy

Our main focus will be on Instagram because of our interest on millennials and outdoor

photos.it is a popular platform among these age groups. Quality photography is the most liked

5

content on Instagram. The audience will respond more on images with nature, cities and

countries because of the need to travel.

Facebook strategy

Our target audience on Facebook is mature and older with a professional taste. It is a diverse

platform that will allow us to reach all the audience. However, Facebook is sometimes

expensive in promoting content.

Conclusion

The social media marketing plan is a major goal for the company in its ability to grow the brand

awareness and increase engagement. This is possible through numerous likes, comments and

shares of our products. It will help increase sales and revenue of the company.

Marketing homework help

International Marketing Task brief & rubrics

Task: Individual case study analysis

Read the case study uploaded to Moodle titled “The Netflix effect” in Thailand by Pirongrong Ramasoota, Abhibhu Kitikamdhorn (you can find it in a PDF format

at the top part of the course’s page, right below the shortcuts). Here is a link to the publisher’s page of the case study too. Answer the following questions:

1. Identify and discuss the nature and type of marketing issues in the case (25%). Think about the aspects of the case that would involve the marketing

department. How does the marketing framework (of the international market) look like in this case? Develop it in a reasoned manner.

2. Were these strategies/tactics/actions implemented? (10%). What did the company do well? Where did they go wrong?

3. What were the consequences of the taken strategies/tactics/actions? (15%). What was the aftermath of their strategy? How did customers react? What

did the company do? How did competitors react? What is the situation now? Conduct further research if necessary.

4. Were procedures in line with existing codes of practice, policy, or theories? (25%). Mention all theories and frameworks that should be developed when

expanding. Develop one of the cultural theories of analysis seen in class and reflect on the findings. Did the company apply this tool correctly? Why/not?

5. Design possible recommendations aimed at provided better responses or fixing the identified issues (25%). Considering all the previous analysis, come up

with 2-4 recommendations for the company to maintain or improve their position in this international market. Conduct a SLEPT analysis if necessary.

Formalities:

• Wordcount: 2000 words (+/- 10%)

• Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

• Font: Arial 12 pts.

• The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Submission and weight: Week 5, 08th of May 2022 – with a weighting of 40%. Submission through Turnitin submission point on Moodle (no e-mail submissions)

It assesses the following learning outcomes:

• analyze the role of marketing in world markets in the complex global competitive environment landscape.

• contrast and examine the complex business environment from political, cultural, legal, technological, and economical angles and industry

perspectives.

• critically evaluate and formulate marketing strategies in the international context.

Rubrics midterm

Exceptional 90-100 Good 80-89 Fair 70-79 Marginal fail 60-69

Discussion of
marketing factors

(25%)

You clearly identify all the
necessary factors that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is well-argued and using
pertinent vocabulary and
developing the marketing
framework appropriately.

You identify all the
activities that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is overall justified, and the
marketing framework is
well developed. Consider
emphasizing key
vocabulary seen in class.

You clearly identify the
necessary factors that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is well-argued overall but
using pertinent vocabulary
and more details in the
framework would improve
this part of your work.

You should clearly identify all
the necessary factors that
the marketing department is
involved in. The marketing
framework is addressed but
not properly or fully
developed. Further
development and
explanations are needed.

Analysis of the
implementation

and consequences
(25%)

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are well explained overall.
The consequences of the
company’s entrance in the
market are explained in
detail and following a very
good reasoning.

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are appropriately
explained. The
consequences of the
company’s presence are
addressed in good enough
detail.

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are included but could use
some revision. The
consequences of the
company’s strategy gare
addressed but further
development is needed.

The strategies applied in the
market of destination are
well explained overall. The
consequences of the
company’s entrance in the
market are explained in
detail and following a very
good reasoning.

Analysis of codes of
practice, policy, or

theories (25%)

The list of necessary
frameworks is very
adequate, and the cultural
analysis includes all
necessary information,
relying on very good
sources and demonstrating
excellent understanding of
the tool.

The list of necessary
frameworks is adequate,
and the cultural analysis
includes good information,
relying on good sources
and demonstrating an
overall good understanding
of the tool. Some parts
could be further explained.

The list of necessary
frameworks is included,
although some others may
be needed. The cultural
analysis includes
interesting information but
using more details at key
sections would improve
your work.

The list of necessary
frameworks misses
important tools, and
although the cultural analysis
includes interesting
information, explicitly
referring and applying the
tool as seen in class would be
best.

Recommendations
(25%)

The recommendations
reflect on previous analysis
very adequately and
demonstrate very good
critical thinking skills.

The recommendations
reflect on previous analysis
to a good extent and
demonstrate good critical
thinking skills.

The recommendations
could reflect more on
previous analysis, but they
show fair critical thinking
skills overall.

The recommendations need
to reflect on previous
analysis in order to
demonstrate good critical
thinking skills.

Marketing homework help

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 1

King County: A Case Study Model for Strategic Marketing

Planning for Airport Managers

William Rankin
University of Central Missouri

Abstract

Marketing planning in an airport as with other organizations is all about selecting
appropriate target groups and formulating a marketing mix to achieve marketing objectives and
financial targets. However, the factors which need to be considered in the dynamic and ever
changing airport industry means that airport marketing planning is more than just applying
general theory to practice. Therefore, this paper considers the unique case of airports and goes
through the modern day planning process using the example of King County International
Airport. It starts by considering the mission, value and vision statements to establish where the
airport wants to be and looks at the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to
assess where the airport is now. This leads to an evaluation of the marketing strategies which
should be adopted.

Keywords: Airport Management, Airport Marketing, Strategic Planning, Marketing Management
Airport Decision Making

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 2

Introduction

Marketing planning case studies help airport managers prepare for real-world problems,

situations and crises by providing an approximation of various marketing environments. Thus,
through the examination of specific marketing cases, airport managers are given the opportunity
to work issues through the trials, tribulations, experiences, and research findings of other
marketing professionals. An obvious advantage to this mode of marketing planning is that it
allows airport managers the exposure to settings and contexts that they might not otherwise
experience. One way to study airport marketing issues is through the use of strategic marketing
planning case studies. Strategic marketing planning is a process of developing a map or route an
airport will follow which identifies what products are to be provided to which customers, where
they will be provided, and at what price. Based on the vision and mission statements, an airport
strategic marketing planning summarizes the basic operational tasks, goals, objectives, strategies,
and tactics for the airport organization (Quilty, 1999; Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

The mission need not be measurable, but it is something the airport employees can work
toward regardless of intermediate achievements. Compared to mission, objectives imply a
shorter, measurable time period with an accomplishment that can be measured in numerical
terms. For example, an objective might be to achieve 90% hangar utilization within 2 years
(Quilty, 1999). A strategy is a major course of action and implies a relatively longer time span
than tactics. A strategy is what one is going to do and not how the airport is going to do it. A
tactic, on the other hand is how the airport is going to achieve the strategy and the ultimate goal.
It is a series of shorter action items that are part of the strategy. “Michael Porter, a management
scholar, has identified three classes of competitive advantage strategies. The classes are known
as low-cost producer, differentiation, and focus” (Quilty, 1999, p. 21).

The low-cost producer attempts to hold prices low by minimizing costs. These efforts
may take the form of efficient scale of production facilities, product design, distribution
channels, raw materials procurement, etc. Part of this strategy can involve selling in volume so
that low profits per unit may be offset. This strategy is observed in air carriers such as
Southwest™ Airlines, but it is also practiced in general aviation fuel marketing, at airports
attempting to buy large amounts of chemicals or sand for winter use, and in the air cargo industry
(Quilty, 1999).

Differentiation strategy involves creating a unique image of the organization’s product or
service so that customers may be charged for that uniqueness. Companies that employ this
strategy stress high quality, image, or technological leadership, among other possibilities.
“Milwaukee International Airport has long stressed its airport as an alternative to Chicago’s
O’Hare International Airport, while many general aviation airports stress their ease of use and
access to important business and commercial centers or recreation areas” (Quilty, 1999, pp. 21-
22). Differentiation strategy can be viewed between Federal Express and United Parcel Service,
and between United Airlines and American Airlines.

A focus strategy typically targets a segment of a larger market and specializes in a
particular geographic location or customer group. The focused approach attempts to serve the
targeted needs so well that competitors are left with no opening to gain market share. An
example is a fixed base operator (FBO) that specializes in specialized maintenance to the point
where other FBOs in the area would not find it feasible to establish such a service (Quilty, 1999;
Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

The concept of competitive advantage causes airport managers to focus on meeting and

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 3

anticipating the expectations of airport customers by comparing their airport’s performance to
other airports or to other transportation modes. It requires an understanding of the competition’s
strengths and weaknesses through and benchmark analysis. It can also be used to assess how
related businesses located on the airport may respond or pursue their business activity (Quilty,
1999; Pearce and Robinson, 2005).

In addition to pursuing competitive advantage, an airport may attempt to occupy a special
niche in the environment that is unique to its capabilities, or which offers an opportunity
overlooked by competitors. The strategy in this case is to occupy the niche and then erect
barriers that prevent other organizations from challenging the unique position. Airlines and
airport service companies often attempt to use this strategy (Quilty, 1999; Pearce and Robinson,
2005).

Marketing Objectives

Marketing objectives are time bound statements of intended future results and general
and continuing statements of intended future results. For purposes of this paper, the marketing
objectives for the King County International Airport (KCIA)* are as follows:

1. Identify those elements of the strategic marketing management process that

precede strategic decision-making at the KCIA.
2. Identify and address the products and services that exist at KCIA.
3. Identify and address the customers and markets that exist at KCIA.
4. Identify and address the competitive advantages of KCIA.
5. Identify and address what product and market emphasis KCIA should pursue.
6. Identify the strategy or strategies that KCIA should implement and pursue.

*Note: KCIA is not the official airport identifier; it is generally only used in promotional
material. The proper identifier is IATA: BFI, ICAO: KBFI.

The History of King County International Airport

According to King County (2004), in 1928 King County voters approved a $1 million
plan to build the region’s first public airport. Today, the airport is one of the busiest airports in
the nation and ranks as one of the most successful public investments in Washington State. The
airport was named after the founder of the Boeing Aircraft Company, William E. Boeing, and the
airport helped to foster the growth of the Boeing Company throughout the 1930s. It served as the
regional center for commercial and recreational aviation in the Seattle area during this era (King
County Airport Division, 2002).

Just one day prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the airport was taken over by the
federal government due to its strategic location and its importance as a Boeing production center.
During the World War II era, the airport was devoted to the production of the B-17 and the B-29
bombers, which played key roles in the European and Pacific theaters. After the war years, the
airport served as the primary passenger airport in the region until the construction and
completion of Sea-Tac International Airport in the early 1950s (King County Airport Division,
2002).

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 4

Today, King County International Airport (KCIA) is one of the busiest airports in the
nation, serving more than 375,000 aircraft operations per year by recreational, corporate,
military, and Boeing jet aircraft. The airport continues to provide limited passenger service and is
the primary air cargo airport in the region. The airport is owned and operated by the King County
Department of Transportation, Airport Division, and receives no general tax revenues to support
its operations. The airport is the site for the final production and delivery of the Boeing 737 and
757 aircraft, and a testing center for the Boeing 777 and military AWACS program. See
Appendix A for the facilities layout of KCIA (King County Airport Division, 2002).

Mission, Values, and Vision Statements

The mission, values, and vision statements of the King County International Airport are
as follows:

Mission Statement

The mission of the King County International Airport is to support the economic vitality
of the county, to support the national air transportation system, to encourage advanced
technology, to provide safe and continuous general aviation airport services to King
County businesses and residents and to serve as the gateway to the county. In fulfilling
this mission, the Airport will be a good neighbor and environmental steward and will
provide quality facilities to Airport tenants and operators in an efficient, environmentally
safe and fiscally prudent manner. (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Values Statement

The values of KCIA are:
1. Safety is crucial
2. Economic vitality, responsiveness to the area economy
3. Looking to the future
4. Environmentally sound
5. Collaborative in community
6. Innovative
7. National leader
8. Support state-of-the-art manufacturing (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Vision Statement

By the year 2018, the King County International Airport will be a national leader
developing partnerships with the King County community, businesses and residents to
provide airport facilities and services which are environmentally and economically sound
and ensure the community’s well being. Today:

1. KCIA strives to be the best airport in the country and serves its aviation customers
well.

2. KCIA strives for excellent relationships with the community. There will be
mutual respect between the airport and the community, even when the community
does not like the impacts of airport operations.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 5

3. KCIA strives to be an excellent County agency, highly regarded by County
officials (elected and appointed) as being reliable, efficient, effective, and
responsive.

4. KCIA is a great place to work. Employees are valued, recognized, trained and
have a great time. (King County Airport Division, 2002, p.1)

Problem Statement

To achieve the mission, values and vision of King County International Airport, the
County must adopt a sound strategic marketing management plan and implement specific
strategies for success. What are the appropriate strategies to implement? In strategic marketing
management, one way to assess the airport marketing environment is through strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis.

Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities and Threats Analysis

According to Pearce and Robinson (2000), SWOT is an acronym for the strengths and
weaknesses of an organization and the environmental opportunities and threats that an
organization faces. The analysis is based on the assumption that an effective strategy evolves
from a sound fit between the organization’s internal resources and the organization’s external
realities, or situation, as follows:

1. A strength is a resource advantage relative to its position or situation and the
needs of the community it serves.

2. A weakness is a limitation or deficiency in one or more of the organization’s
realities or situation that impedes it full potential or effectiveness.

3. An opportunity is a major favorable reality in the organization’s environment.
Key trends, for example, are one source of opportunities.

4. A threat is a major unfavorable reality in an organization’s environment. Threats
are impediments to the organization’s desired reality or position. (pp. 191-221)

SWOT analyses are used in many ways to aid strategy makers. One of the most common
ways is to use it as a framework to guide systematic development of the organization’s resources
based on the alternatives available to the organization. SWOT analyses are a framework of
choice among many strategy makers because of its simplicity of sound strategy formulation –
matching an organization’s opportunities and threats with its strengths and weaknesses (Pearce
and Robinson, 2005).

KCIA SWOT Analysis

Review of the Airport Manager Candidate Information Materials from King County

(2002), revealed the following SWOT analysis:

Strengths

1. KCIA serves a diverse set of clients, ranging from private pilots to large corporate
aircraft operations, as well as government organizations, retailers, wholesalers,
and a variety of other services. Boeing Aircraft Company maintains a significant
production facility at the airport.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 6

2. KCIA generates more than 10,000 jobs in the County and is responsible for $1.6
billion in sales by airport tenants. The airport supports the earning of $0.5 billion
in labor income per year. Finally, $39 million in state and local taxes are
generated by the airport each year.

3. With approximately 150 businesses based at KCIA, including air cargo
companies, flight schools, charter operations, and helicopter operations, most
business activity at KCIA is sold outside the county economy. Approximately
82% of the gross volumes of sales at the airport are represented as new money to
the County economy. This activity would not be present in King County without
KCIA.

4. With two runways (3,710 and 10,001feet in length) and four fixed base operators,
KCIA provides all the facilities necessary to support jet and piston driven aircraft
and helicopter activity. KCIA is also an FAA-designated General Aviation
Reliever Airport for Sea-Tac International Airport, making the airport eligible for
FAA reliever airport grant funding.

Weaknesses

1. In recent years, most of the KCIA tenants have experienced a downturn in
business, which is strongly related to the national economy and the events of
September 11, 2001. Activities at the Boeing production facility have also
declined somewhat in the last few years. This is partly attributable to the cessation
of B757 production in Renton.

2. Slow recovery of the local economy, increased federal security requirements,
potential competition from Sea-Tac International and Paine Field airports for air
cargo and aviation industrial activity, could result in inadequate landing and fuel
flowage fees to support airport operations and capital investments.

3. Aircraft operations at KCIA have severe noise impacts on the community. The
airspace of KCIA, Sea-Tac International, and Renton airports intersects, forcing
cargo aircraft to fly lower than they would normally have to on approach to
KCIA. Also, the County has no jurisdiction over aircraft once they are airborne;
the FAA is responsible for the safe and efficient use of the national airspace in the
region.

4. The Airport Police/Aircraft Firefighting is managed and operated by the King
County Sheriff’s Department as a contract service to KCIA. In addition to these
duties they are also responsible for the Runway Safety Inspection Program,
wildlife control, ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections,
as well as building inspections. KCIA is paying a premium for these services. Of
the current $5 million annual operating budget, KCIA is paying the King County
Sheriff’s Department more than $2 million annually.

5. KCIA has finite land resources. The airport has a total of 594 acres available for
aeronautical development — see Appendix A.

6. KCIA also lies in an area often affected by low visibility and is not serviced by an
instrument approach allowing operations below a visual range of one mile.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 7

Opportunities

1. KCIA has a strong demand for available airfield land and facilities. At the same
time lease revenues appear to be stabilizing with the Boeing Company generating
$2.7 million annually. Other lease revenues indicate a modest growth while lease
rates are adjusted on a three year appraisal cycle.

2. KCIA has a master plan and financial program which outlines a schedule for
runway improvements, taxiway improvements, and environmental mitigation in
support of aviation users, industry, and the community.

3. KCIA owns and manages 10 buildings located on airport property that generate
26% of the airports annual income. These buildings are leased primarily to state
and local governmental agencies. New lease and air service opportunities exist
with the remodeling of the main terminal building completed just last year (see
Figure 1).

12% 7%

4%

77%

Fuel Flowage

Aircraft Parking

Landing Fees

Land and Facility

Rent

Figure 1. KCIA Annual Airport Revenue by Cost Centers (King County
Airport Division, 2002).

4. Taking back control over the Runway Safety Inspection Program, wildlife control,
ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections, as well as
building inspections offers opportunities to reduce expenses (see Figure 2).

Figure 2. KCIA Annual Expenses by Cost Centers (King County Airport
Division, 2002).

5. KCIA has instituted a noise monitoring and flight tracking system, a Federal
Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 150 Noise and Land Use Compatibility Program,
and a Fly Quite Program aimed at reducing noise in the surrounding

18%

19%

24%

39%

County Overhead

Charges

Services and

Other Charges

Sheriff Contract

Salaries and

Wages

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 8

communities. By partnering with local residents the airport will gain the support
of the local community, which offers opportunities for continued growth and
development, as well as retention of existing businesses.

6. KCIA has instituted a community outreach program called Roundtable.
Roundtable was set up as an advisory board to make recommendations to airport
officials, the County Executive, and County Council on issues of importance
about KCIA to the community.

7. Opportunity Skyway, another outreach program, supports KCIA’s efforts to foster
good relations with nearby communities. It also serves Federal Aviation
Administration goals to support and promote aviation education. The program is
an airport based education program that uses aviation to promote academic and
vocational learning while encouraging career exploration in aviation related
industries. The program was initiated by King Council action in 1996 pursuant to
county government policies that encourage county departments to support
education and regional workforce development.

8. KCIA is also the location of a number of other business activities. Some of these
are located on the west side of the airport, while others are located on the east side
of the airport. They are extremely diverse in their nature. These businesses
include Boeing’s Museum of Flight at the southwest corner of the field. Although
technically, Boeing’s Museum of Flight is not an airport tenant, KCIA staff and
the museum consider themselves part of the airport family. Several producer
service businesses with no relationship to the airport simply rent office space
through KCI tenants. The opportunity to lease more space to these types of
tenants is a possibility.

Threats

1. The single largest threat to KCIA is that Boeing is exploring possible moves to
Wichita, Tulsa, St. Louis, Long Beach and overseas, and will continue doing so
for the foreseeable future.

2. Any recession to the local economy continues to be a threat to KCIA.
3. Increased homeland security constraints.
4. Loss of 100 octane aviation gas due to EPA concerns.

Strategy Considerations and Recommendations

The following strategy considerations and recommendations should be considered for
KCIA:

1. Complete planned capital investments in support of aviation users, industry, and
community,

2. Take back control over the Runway Safety Inspection Program, wildlife control,
ramp certification training, fuel truck operations and inspections, as well as
building inspections.

3. Develop an airport business plan to support initiatives and investments of KCIA.
4. Develop an airport marketing plan to support the initiatives and investments of

KCIA.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 9

5. Improve airport information sharing between KCIA, Paine, Renton, and Sea-Tac
International airports.

6. Maintain participation with the business community and the Roundtable advisory
board.

7. Leverage location, marketplace, and resources to achieve maximum efficiencies
with regard to field capacity, the Boeing Company, industrial land and cargo
development.

8. Support regional economic strategies.
9. Be a good neighbor to the surrounding communities.
10. Market KCIA as a full service general aviation airport.
11. Market KCIA as a reliever airport for Sea-Tac International Airport.
12. Market KCIA as a major air cargo facility.

Concluding Remarks

As one of the busiest general aviation and reliever airports in the country, KCIA plays a
key role in the regions vitality. Like all airports, KCIA has its strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats that, if properly managed, will continue to propel economic growth in
the Puget Sound region for years to come. To assist airport managers in the facilitation of a
SWOT analysis, a facilitation guide and suggested outcomes for the KCIA strategic marketing
planning case study model are attached as Appendix B.

References

King County (2004). King county international airport. Retrieved September 28, 2004, from

http://www.metroke.gov/airport
King County Airport Division (2002). Airport manager candidate information materials. : King

County, WA.
Quilty, S. M. (1999). The management functions. Washington, DC: American Association of

Airport Executives.
Pearce II, J. A., & Robinson Jr., R. B. (2000). Strategic management (7th ed.). : McGraw-Hill,

NY.

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 10

Appendix A
KCIA Facilities Layout Diagram

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 11

Appendix B
Suggested Outcomes and Facilitation Guide

Marketing Questions
According to Quilty (1999), airport marketing planners should ask the following
questions in preparation of strategic marketing management plans:

1. Questions that precede strategic decision making:
a. What values are going to guide the airport business?
b. How far down the road should the airport look?
c. What assumptions about the external environment underpin the airport’s

strategy (regulation, the economy, resource availability, technology,
competition, and the market)?

2. Questions that address products and services:
a. What existing and new products and services can the airport offer or not offer?
b. What criteria can the airport use to evaluate a new product or service

opportunities?
3. Questions that address customers and markets:

a. What existing and new customer groups can the airport serve or not serve?
b. What criteria will the airport use to evaluate a new market opportunity?

4. Questions that address competitive advantages:
a. What factors (price and/or the various dimensions of quality) are meaningful to

the airport’s customers?
b. Which factors can represent an airport’s competitive advantage?

5. Questions that address product and market emphasis:
a. In which of our current product or market areas should the airport place its

greatest emphasis (resources and attention)?
b. In what new product or market areas should the airport place its greatest

emphasis?
6. Questions that address strategy implementation:

a. What financial and non-financial measures can the airport use to assess the
viability of the strategy?

b. What strategy should the airport implement to ensure that departmental goals,
process goals, position and people goals, organizational design and
management support the mission of KCIA?

Facilitation Guide

This guide provides a suggested approach to facilitating both the content areas and the
marketing scenarios in the King County International Airport Case Study. It has been developed
to be used for all marketing modalities.

Decision-Making Facilitation Approach to Strategy Marketing Development and
Implementation

A problem solving model is suggested for making key decisions to be used by strategic
marketing planners after a SWOT is performed. A suggested decision making model shown in
the diagram below:

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 12

Figure 1. Problem solving model.

Airport managers need to understand that the strategic marketing planning begins with an
understanding and recognition of the systems and constituencies within which an airport
operates. They should learn that a strategic marketing plan is a disciplined effort to produce
fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an airport is, what an airport does,
and why an airport does it does (Quilty, 1999).

Among the considerations of strategic marketing planning are the development of a
vision and mission statement, organizational objectives, and marketing strategies to carry out the
objectives. Airport managers need to know that top airport management is responsible for
formulating a vision or future course of action for the organization. Plans and objectives derived
from the vision and mission statement provide a purpose and a direction to the organization. It is
important that airport managers begin to recognize that the marketing planning process is a
continuous and not a one time event. Proper strategic marketing planning, as it relates to overall
organizational goals, involves a number of steps. Those steps involve (a) developing vision and
mission statements; (b) identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT); (c)
developing a strategic marketing plan and tactical and operational plans; (d) making, buying or
otherwise obtaining necessary resources; (e) implementing the strategic marketing plan; (f) and
then evaluating and revising the plan as necessary or required.

Finally, airport managers need to understanding that having a strategy is only half of the
strategic marketing planning process. Implementing the strategy is the determinate of its success.
Once strategies have been selected, decisions must be made regarding the best organizational
structure for implementing the strategies. Generally speaking, the simpler the airports structure
the better. However, the more significant the modification, change, or expansion in the product,
service, customer, or geographic area is, the more the organizational structure may need to be
modified. A tactical plan can help the implementation process. Tactical plans encompass a short
time span, generally one year, and are more detailed than strategic plans. A tactical plan is
oriented toward the means of attaining goals, whereas a strategic plan is oriented toward the
objectives and goals themselves. These points should be emphasized throughout the facilitation
of this case study.
Suggested Outcomes

Airport marketing planners should ask the following questions in preparation of strategic

The situation provides the venue in which to identify the SWOT issues

1. Define the situation 2. Frame the correct
issues

3. Define the end-state
goals

4. Identify the
alternative strategies

7. Make the
decision(s)

8. Implement the
strategy

9. Evaluate results and
take corrective actions

5. Evaluate the
alternatives

6. Assess risks

Journal of Aviation Management and Education

King County: A Case, Page 13

marketing plans:
1. Questions that precede strategic marketing decision making:

a. What values are going to guide the airport business? The most
successful marketing strategies are those consistent with the airport culture
that exists. If not, then the culture must be changed in some way to be
consistent with the airport culture which exists. Organizational culture is
the shared values of the organization.

b. How far down the road should the airport look? Milestones should be
evaluated on a yearly basis. Rarely are strategic plan accurate more than
five years into the future. Annual or semi-annual reevaluation is
recommended.

c. What assumptions about the external marketing environment underpin the
airport’s marketing strategy (regulation, the economy, resource
availability, technology, competition, and the market)? Assumptions and
beliefs shape the way things are done in the organization. Environmental
scanning is important element in making assumptions for future decisions.

2. Questions that address products and services:
a. What existing and new products and services will the airport offer or not

offer? Products and services can include best practices in the areas of
customer service, ground transportation, facilities and maintenance,
technology, etc.

b. What criteria will the airport use to evaluate a new product or service
opportunity? Studying and measuring other organizations, including those
outside airports, that demonstrate world class performance is an important
tool – benchmarking.

3. Questions that address customers and markets:
a. In addition to identifying new customers, what existing and new customer

groups will the airport serve or not serve? Social responsibility plays a part
here. This may inc

Marketing homework help

Your Ideal Social Media Team

Imagine you are a manager at an organization that did not currently have any in-house social media staffing and did not engage in any outside sources or consulting. You have now been tasked to build a social media team/department. Describe what your recommendations for the roles, staffing, tools, policies, etc. to run and manage social media for the organization.

If it helps you to provide context of the size of the organization (e.g.: small non-profit vs. large corporation), you may state a general size of the company or use one of your organizations; however, this assignment is to reflect YOUR THOUGHTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, NOT REPORT WHAT A NAMED COMPANY IS CURRENTLY DOING.

You also do not have to worry about providing any kind of budget or cost numbers; but remember the size/roles of the team typically has a relationship to the kind and size of organization.

A few thought-starters (you may or may not choose to use this list):

· What roles would you hire? What would be the responsibilities for each (high-level)?

· What tools and other resources would you desire? Provide a description of why you would need them, and the tasks the tools would be used for.

· What types of rules and policies would you recommend the organization put in place?

· Would you outsource any activities or roles? Why or why not?

Assignment must be minimum of 600 words. (APA format)

Marketing homework help

Requirement:

2 paragraphs for each topic, and at least 5 sentences each paragraph.

1-2 references applied for each topic and in-text citation.

The last sentence of each paragraph should not be a reference, because it will take the author’s voice away.

Topic:

1. newspaper advertising

2. Network television advertising

3. fourth cover advertising

4. Media planning

5. category development index (CDI)


Example:

The success of advertising depends first on the relevance. Some creative and advertiser ads feel creative and stand out from the crowd but are not actually relevant to the advertised product. Consumers have no idea what such ads are promoting after they see them. Therefore, no matter how creative it was, it failed because it forgot the economic purpose of advertising itself. For example, some products are advertised by celebrities, only to have the ads become promotional videos for the celebrities themselves. The audience remembers the star, not the product. Especially when some stars do the image spokesperson of multiple products, the advertising effect is worse. Therefore, it is very important to know how to ensure the relevancy of creative advertising.

According to textbooks, relevance can be achieved in two ways: ad-to-consumer relevance and brand-to-consumer relevance. (Belch, 2020) Ad-to-consumer relevance refers to how elements used in advertisements attract consumers’ attention and interest. Such as citing popular topics, celebrity endorsements, or targeting the preferences of a specific audience. On the other hand, brand-to-consumer relevance refers to the effectiveness of advertising in accurately conveying information about a particular product or service to consumers. The example above was how advertisers overemphasize ad-to-consumer relevance and neglect brand-to-consumer relevance. Therefore, finding a balance between the two is an important indicator to measure the success of an AD’s relevance.

Reference:

Belch, G. E. (2020). Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective (12th Edition). McGraw-Hill Higher Education (US). https://fidm.vitalsource.com/books/9781260796452

Marketing homework help

Select any publicly listed Saudi Company that operates in GCC, and write a (minimum of 1000 word): ( I choose Alinma Bank)

1. Present the study report with clear Introduction and Conclusion including your own views. (minimum words: 300)

1. Using SWOT analysis, analyze the external and internal environment of your selected company. (minimum words: 500)

Strengths: Explain the strengths of the selected company;

Weaknesses: Describe the areas of weakness in the company’s operations;

Opportunities: Examine factors that may improve the company’s chances of success;

Threats: Discuss the external threats to the business company’s success.

1. Analyze the political, economic, cultural and legal challenges the company currently faces in any of the country it operates (select one country in which the company operates for this analysis). (minimum words: 300)

Marketing homework help

Competencies

In this project, you will demonstrate your mastery of the following competencies:

· Apply elements of the marketing mix to inform business decisions that support organizational objectives

· Determine appropriate marketing and communication distribution channels

· Explain how marketing decisions are made to target the consumer

Scenario

Chocolate Bliss started as a small, family-owned store in Seattle, Washington in 1976. While once a boutique chocolatier selling handmade “secret family recipe” chocolate bonbons, the company today has a wider variety of product offerings including boxed chocolate candies, chocolate baking products, and carob (chocolate alternative) candies and health bars. Chocolate Bliss products are sold online and in their stores to consumers and to other businesses, specifically grocery stores, throughout the Northwest.

The company has maintained its “secret family recipe” brand even as it has expanded its product offerings, and today enjoys strong brand awareness in the states where it is sold.

The company’s primary competitors are:

· Ghirardelli Chocolate Company

· Chocolate Bliss’s higher-price range baking products, sold to grocery stores, compete directly with Ghirardelli.

· Chocolate Bliss also competes with Ghirardelli for its boxed chocolate candies sold in their stores and online to consumers, and sold to grocery stores.

· Nestlé

· Chocolate Bliss’s mid-price range baking products, sold to grocery stores, compete directly with Nestlé.

· Rise Bar

· Chocolate Bliss competes with Rise Bar for its carob (chocolate alternative) products sold in their stores and online to consumers, and sold to grocery stores.

Chocolate Bliss is financially healthy and has plans to expand into the midwestern United States. This expansion will include the launch of a new product.

You have been with the company for a few years and have been selected to be on the team that will develop a marketing plan for the new product launch. The executives at Chocolate Bliss will use the marketing plan to make decisions about how to best use the marketing budget to ensure a successful product launch, so you need to have sound research and reasoning to support your work that will contribute to developing a marketing plan. You also realize that the marketing plan is not just about a successful product launch; it is about building the Chocolate Bliss brand and positioning the company strongly against its competitors, especially when it comes to price point.

Directions

1. Product Selection: Begin by selecting which product you want to be the basis of your entire project. Specifically, choose one of the following products:

· Gourmet truffles with fruit, herb, and flower extract infusions

· Semisweet chocolate baking chips

· “Healthy” carob (chocolate substitute) bars

Then, based on your product selection, complete the components below, which will contribute to the development of a marketing plan. You will use the Marketing Plan Strategy Template in the What to Submit section to help structure your marketing plan submission.

1. Persona (Target Market): Research the target market (potential buyers) for your chosen product to develop a persona. Specifically, address the following:

A. Conduct target market research to identify key demographic and psychographic characteristics.

B. Develop one persona that represents users of your chosen product. Use the Module Two Milestone Worksheet in your Soomo webtext to create your persona.

C. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Two milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your persona as needed for inclusion in your project submission.

1. Promotion: Recommend marketing communication channels for your chosen product. Specifically, address the following:

A. Recommend two marketing communication channels for your chosen product. Briefly describe each and explain why they are appropriate based on your persona.

B. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Four milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your marketing communication channel selections as needed for inclusion in your project submission.

1. Price: Consider how pricing for your chosen product should be set. Specifically, address the following:

A. Explain how one of the following is used to determine the approach to pricing for any offering.

· Company profitability

· Competitor pricing

· Target market price sensitivity

B. Identify which one of the four basic pricing strategies you feel is most appropriate for your chosen product and persona from the Module Two milestone. Describe the general advantages and drawbacks of that pricing strategy.

C. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Four milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your pricing strategy selection as needed for inclusion in your project submission.

1. Place (Distribution Channels): Consider how decisions on distribution channels should be made. Specifically, address the following:

A. Describe how one recent change in the marketplace (e.g., purchasing habits or social, economic, and political events) has affected distribution of products.

B. Recommend one potential distribution channel for your chosen product and explain why it is appropriate, given your persona.

C. Draft this portion of the project as part of the Module Five milestone, and after you receive feedback from your instructor, revise your distribution channel selection as needed for inclusion in your project submission.

1. Product: Identify considerations for the ways in which your chosen product should be marketed. Specifically, address the following:

A. Explain, in one to two paragraphs, how your chosen product should be marketed in relation to meeting the needs and wants of your persona (e.g., the features and benefits of your chosen product that directly address your persona’s needs and wants).

i. Consider how a product you regularly purchase is marketed in terms of consumer needs and wants. What is the marketing message, and what other methods are used to convey the benefits of the product? Use this as a guide to describe how you would suggest marketing your chosen product to your persona.

B. Describe, in one to two paragraphs, how bringing this product to the marketplace can help support and build the company’s brand.

2. Describe the Chocolate Bliss brand based on the scenario. Explain how offering your chosen product is in alignment with the brand, and how bringing the product to the marketplace will help the company increase awareness of its brand.

1. Evaluation: Identify how you would evaluate the effectiveness of the marketing plan. Keep in mind that you need to collect data on the target market and the competition.

A. Identify two specific quantitative data-collection tools you should use and explain, in two to three paragraphs, how they can help you evaluate the marketing plan. Quantitative data comes in the form of numbers.

B. Identify two specific qualitative data-collection tools you should use and explain, in two to three paragraphs, how they can help you evaluate the marketing plan. Qualitative data comes in the form of words and sentences.

What to Submit

To complete this project, you must submit the following:

Template
Marketing Plan Strategy Template

Submit this template as a Word document. Your submission should be no more than 4 pages in length. Sources should be cited according to APA style.

Project Rubric

Criteria

Exemplary (100%)

Proficient (85%)

Needs Improvement (55%)

Not Evident (0%)

Value

Product Selection

Clearly states the product selection from among the options provided

N/A

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include naming a product that is an option in the project

Does not attempt criterion

2

Persona (Target Market): Demographic Characteristics

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Develops a logical description of the required demographic characteristics of the target market based on information from appropriate research sources

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing more accurate or complete listings of demographic characteristics

Does not attempt criterion

5

Persona (Target Market): Psychographic Characteristics

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Develops a logical description of the required psychographic characteristics of the target market based on information from appropriate research sources

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing more accurate or complete listings of psychographic characteristics

Does not attempt criterion

5

Persona (Target Market): Persona

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Creates a plausible persona that includes all of the required elements

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include creating a more logical persona based on the research

Does not attempt criterion

10

Promotion: Two Marketing Communication Channels

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Accurately describes two marketing communication channels and provides a logical explanation of why they are appropriate given the persona

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate description of the marketing communication channels, or a more cogent explanation of why the channels are appropriate for the persona

Does not attempt criterion

10

Price: Approach to Pricing

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Clearly explains one of the factors used to determine product pricing

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more complete explanation of the chosen factor’s influence on price

Does not attempt criterion

10

Price: Pricing Strategies

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Selects a pricing strategy appropriate for the product and persona and accurately describes its advantages and drawbacks

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate or thorough explanation of the pricing strategy, including advantages and drawbacks of the selected strategy, or providing a more cogent explanation as to why the pricing strategy is appropriate, given the persona

Does not attempt criterion

10

Place (Distribution Channels): Recent Change in the Marketplace

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Clearly explains a recent change in the marketplace and how it has affected distribution of products

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more detailed description of the recent change or a more logical connection between the change and how it affected distribution of products

Does not attempt criterion

10

Place (Distribution Channels): Distribution Channel

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Recommends a distribution channel and provides a logical explanation as to why it is appropriate for given the persona

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more accurate or thorough explanation of the distribution channel or a more cogent explanation of why the distribution channel is appropriate, given the persona

Does not attempt criterion

10

Product: Marketed

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Clearly explains ideas for how the product should be marketed that are appropriate given the persona

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more thorough explanation of ideas for marketing the product or a more logical connection between the marketing ideas and the persona’s needs and wants

Does not attempt criterion

5

Product: Brand

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Provides a cogent description of how the product can support and build the brand

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include providing a more convincing description of how the product can support and build the brand

Does not attempt criterion

5

Evaluation: Quantitative

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Selects two quantitative data-collection tools and clearly explains how they can be used to evaluate the marketing plan

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include recommending a more appropriate tool selection or providing a more thorough description of how the data collected can be used for evaluation

Does not attempt criterion

5

Evaluation: Qualitative

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Selects two qualitative data-collection tools and clearly explains how they can be used to evaluate the marketing plan

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include recommending a more appropriate tool selection or a more thorough description of how the data collected can be used for evaluation

Does not attempt criterion

5

Articulation of Response

Exceeds proficiency in an exceptionally clear, insightful, sophisticated, or creative manner

Clearly conveys meaning with correct grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, demonstrating an understanding of audience and purpose

Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors in grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, negatively impacting readability

Submission has critical errors in grammar, sentence structure, and spelling, preventing understanding of ideas

4

Citations and Attributions

Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with few or no minor errors

Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with consistent minor errors

Uses citations for ideas requiring attribution, with major errors

Does not use citations for ideas requiring attribution

4

Total:

100%

Marketing homework help

Read about the start of Warby Parker. ( https://www.nxtbookmedia.com/blog/warby-parker/ ) Then answer the following questions, explaining the reasoning behind your positions/responses:

1. How do you believe Warby Parker used entrepreneurship marketing and innovation to create an opportunity to grow the company?

2. What do you believe distinguishes Warby Parker’s successes versus the failures of other companies in the eyeglass market?


3. Provide an example of an entrepreneurial action similar to that of Warby Parker that has proven to be successful in China.

Marketing homework help

International Marketing Task brief & rubrics

Task: Individual case study analysis

Read the case study uploaded to Moodle titled “The Netflix effect” in Thailand by Pirongrong Ramasoota, Abhibhu Kitikamdhorn (you can find it in a PDF format

at the top part of the course’s page, right below the shortcuts). Here is a link to the publisher’s page of the case study too. Answer the following questions:

1. Identify and discuss the nature and type of marketing issues in the case (25%). Think about the aspects of the case that would involve the marketing

department. How does the marketing framework (of the international market) look like in this case? Develop it in a reasoned manner.

2. Were these strategies/tactics/actions implemented? (10%). What did the company do well? Where did they go wrong?

3. What were the consequences of the taken strategies/tactics/actions? (15%). What was the aftermath of their strategy? How did customers react? What

did the company do? How did competitors react? What is the situation now? Conduct further research if necessary.

4. Were procedures in line with existing codes of practice, policy, or theories? (25%). Mention all theories and frameworks that should be developed when

expanding. Develop one of the cultural theories of analysis seen in class and reflect on the findings. Did the company apply this tool correctly? Why/not?

5. Design possible recommendations aimed at provided better responses or fixing the identified issues (25%). Considering all the previous analysis, come up

with 2-4 recommendations for the company to maintain or improve their position in this international market. Conduct a SLEPT analysis if necessary.

Formalities:

• Wordcount: 2000 words (+/- 10%)

• Cover, Table of Contents, References and Appendix are excluded of the total wordcount.

• Font: Arial 12 pts.

• The in-text References and the Bibliography must be in Harvard’s citation style.

Submission and weight: Week 5, 08th of May 2022 – with a weighting of 40%. Submission through Turnitin submission point on Moodle (no e-mail submissions)

It assesses the following learning outcomes:

• analyze the role of marketing in world markets in the complex global competitive environment landscape.

• contrast and examine the complex business environment from political, cultural, legal, technological, and economical angles and industry

perspectives.

• critically evaluate and formulate marketing strategies in the international context.

Rubrics midterm

Exceptional 90-100 Good 80-89 Fair 70-79 Marginal fail 60-69

Discussion of
marketing factors

(25%)

You clearly identify all the
necessary factors that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is well-argued and using
pertinent vocabulary and
developing the marketing
framework appropriately.

You identify all the
activities that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is overall justified, and the
marketing framework is
well developed. Consider
emphasizing key
vocabulary seen in class.

You clearly identify the
necessary factors that the
marketing department is
involved in. The discussion
is well-argued overall but
using pertinent vocabulary
and more details in the
framework would improve
this part of your work.

You should clearly identify all
the necessary factors that
the marketing department is
involved in. The marketing
framework is addressed but
not properly or fully
developed. Further
development and
explanations are needed.

Analysis of the
implementation

and consequences
(25%)

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are well explained overall.
The consequences of the
company’s entrance in the
market are explained in
detail and following a very
good reasoning.

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are appropriately
explained. The
consequences of the
company’s presence are
addressed in good enough
detail.

The strategies applied in
the market of destination
are included but could use
some revision. The
consequences of the
company’s strategy gare
addressed but further
development is needed.

The strategies applied in the
market of destination are
well explained overall. The
consequences of the
company’s entrance in the
market are explained in
detail and following a very
good reasoning.

Analysis of codes of
practice, policy, or

theories (25%)

The list of necessary
frameworks is very
adequate, and the cultural
analysis includes all
necessary information,
relying on very good
sources and demonstrating
excellent understanding of
the tool.

The list of necessary
frameworks is adequate,
and the cultural analysis
includes good information,
relying on good sources
and demonstrating an
overall good understanding
of the tool. Some parts
could be further explained.

The list of necessary
frameworks is included,
although some others may
be needed. The cultural
analysis includes
interesting information but
using more details at key
sections would improve
your work.

The list of necessary
frameworks misses
important tools, and
although the cultural analysis
includes interesting
information, explicitly
referring and applying the
tool as seen in class would be
best.

Recommendations
(25%)

The recommendations
reflect on previous analysis
very adequately and
demonstrate very good
critical thinking skills.

The recommendations
reflect on previous analysis
to a good extent and
demonstrate good critical
thinking skills.

The recommendations
could reflect more on
previous analysis, but they
show fair critical thinking
skills overall.

The recommendations need
to reflect on previous
analysis in order to
demonstrate good critical
thinking skills.

Marketing homework help

Social Media Marketing:
A Strategic Approach, 2e

Barker & Barker

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted
in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for
classroom use.

Social Media Marketing Plan
Chapter 15

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Chapter Outline (1 of 2)

 Creating an Informative and Eye-Catching Title
Page

 Automatically Generating a Table of Contents
 Writing a Compelling Executive Summary
 Composing a Brief Overview
 Observing Social Media Pres3ence
 Conducting a Competitive Analysis
 Setting Goals

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Chapter Outline (2of 2)

 Determining Strategies
 Identifying the Target Market
 Selecting Platforms
 Implementing
 Monitoring
 Tuning
 Budgeting
 Calculating Return on Investment
 Getting C-Suite Buy-In

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Figure 15.1

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Creating an Informative and Eye-
Catching Title Page
 A sharp title page makes a SMM plan stand

out and instantly provides the reader with
the information necessary to identify the
purpose and authors of the document.

 A title page of the plan should begin with a
descriptive name for the document, followed
by company name, address, contact
information, and authors. See Figure 15.2.
◦ Include the publication date of the document.
◦ Avoid lengthy descriptions on the title page.

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Figure 15.2

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Automatically Generating
a Table of Contents
 A table of contents (TOC) is essential for a

lengthy document such as a SMM plan.
◦ If manually prepared, the TOC should not be

assembled until the plan is finished.
 Go through the entire manuscript to find and record all

section headings, subheadings and page numbers.
 This task is laborious, monotonous, and error-prone.

◦ Modern word processers like Microsoft Word can
automatically generate a TOC from formatted
section headings in the document.
 Formatting can be done during or after document prep.

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Figure 15.3

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Writing a Compelling
Executive Summary
 Lead with Why the Plan Should be Adopted.
 Keep the Audience in Mind.
 Organize the Summary to Reflect the

Structure of the Plan.
 Provide a General Overview of the Main

Components.
 Limit the Length.
 Include the Names of the Plan’s Authors.
 Compose the Executive Summary Last

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Figure 15.4

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Composing a Brief Overview
◦ Describe the industry and firm by providing a

quick look at the past, present and likely future of
the industry and the firm’s track record in it.
◦ Explain the competitive advantage to show how

the firm can realize significant gains by using SMM.
◦ Describe how SMM can contribute by concisely

listing the SM actions required to secure the
competitive advantage. It is dangerous to assume
readers of the plan will readily grasp the value of
SMM, let alone how it can deliver results.
◦ See Figure 15.5 for an example.

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Figure 15.5

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Observing Social Media Presence
◦ Measuring social media brand health can be done

in many ways; five key metrics are:
 Sentiment Analysis: shows the number of positive, neutral,

or negative mentions on each media platform.
 Reach: Indicates the number of Twitter followers,

Facebook fans, LinkedIn group members, etc.
 Company Posts: measure how often the company posts

on each social media platform.
 Feedback: Shows the number of comments, likes, or

replies to company-generated content.
 Average Response Time: Assesses response time to user

comments on the company’s social media properties.
© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Table 15.1

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Conducting a Competitive Analysis
(1 of 2)

◦ One useful way to conduct a competitive analysis
is with a SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities, and Threats).
 Internal factors are classified as strengths and

weaknesses; external factors are categorized as
opportunities and threats.

 To begin a Social Media SWOT Analysis, answer the
questions in Table 15.2.

 Determine the appropriate strategy in the SWOT
Matrix, shown in Table 15.3; if the firm has strengths and
opportunities, an S-O strategy is indicated.

 See Table 15.4.
© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Table 15.2

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Table 15.4

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Table 15.4 (part 1)

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a
certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website or school-approved learning management system for classroom use.

Table 15.4 (part 2)

© 2017 Cengage Learning® May not be s