• Home

Effects of Current Health Policies

Chapter 3 How Did We Get Here?


Previous section


Next section


Chapter 3

How Did We Get Here?

A history of health care policy making in the United States could well start in 1791 with the passage of the Bill of Rights. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution declares that those powers not expressly given to the federal government belong to state and local governments. Health and education were not expressly given to the federal government. In 1910, the Supreme Court ruled that a federal workers’ compensation system was unconstitutional. Each state then established its own system. Hadler (2013) cites this as the regulatory template for the U.S. health insurance program as it developed much later. This issue played out again in June 2012 when the Supreme Court narrowly upheld part, but not all, of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).

With minor exceptions, the federal government has limited its role to financing national programs of health and education, rather than delivering services directly. Federal involvement has been justified under the welfare clause of the Constitution and also through Thomas Jefferson’s argument of implied powers. Yet the federal share of health expenditures is fast approaching half the direct cost of care, even without counting individual tax deductions for health care spending and insurance premiums and corporate deductions for employee health insurance premiums. Tax subsidies, health insurance provided to government employees, and public dollars spent on health at all levels of government account for close to 60% of all health spending.

This chapter looks at the coevolution of two separate, but linked, U.S. health systems—one for delivering medical care and one for financing it. Financing, especially the health insurance system, has impacted delivery systems; for instance, it has created incentives for overutilization or underutilization. Separate health insurance systems exist to cover expenses for dental, vision, and long-term care. Public health is financed primarily through state, local, and federal dollars obtained through taxes and fees.

3.1 Contending Visions of a System for D…


Previous section


Next section

3.1 CONTENDING VISIONS OF A SYSTEM FOR DELIVERING HEALTH CARE

Conflicts between different visions of how the health system should operate have dominated U.S. health care policy making. Different ideas have been more or less dominant at different times. Yet there has not been a dominant viewpoint since the 1960s, and all of the contending approaches have remained on the table. Each ideology or philosophy falls along the continuum of alternatives represented in 
Figure 3-1
. Five potential characterizations of the health care market are presented. One, a provider monopoly, has been ruled out by our legal system, even though it may best describe the U.S. health system as it existed between World Wars I and II (Starr, 1982). A monopoly occurs when the market for a product or service is controlled by a single provider, and in most cases is illegal. A monopsony exists when a single buyer controls a market. The extreme monopsony position can be represented by the original version of the United Kingdom’s National Health Service. This model is not currently a realistic contender for adoption in the United States either.

Oligopolistic competition involves a relatively open market dominated by a few large sellers and is a characteristic of many U.S. industrial sectors. Usually, three or four major sources for goods or services exist, and those sources control at least 40% of the market. In health care, two, three, or four providers often control state or local markets in the absence of a national market. National oligopolies appear to exist in many markets, such as pharmacy benefits management, Medicare managed care, replacement joints, imaging equipment, and pharmaceuticals distribution. Two or three hospital groups often control most of the relevant local market. Concentration in hospital markets has been increasing sharply enough to become a concern of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Although available studies of hospital concentration can yield conflicting findings (Gaynor, 2006), there can be little doubt that concentration increases pricing power. In many state markets the same is true of health insurance providers. Yet it is widely believed that market power has shifted in recent years from insurers to providers, especially larger hospitals and their associated group practices.

images

Figure 3-1 Stages of health care market power.

Starr (2011) describes the process leading up to the passage of the ACA as one of reaching a compromise between administered competition and consumer-driven health care, but the legislation was crafted to be minimally invasive to encourage support from interests such as hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and the insurance industry.

Administered competition implies that there are multiple suppliers but that the market is strongly influenced by a primary (but not exclusive) buyer, usually a government creation. It may involve universal coverage, a single payer, and/or a single underwriter.

Consumer-driven health care is more of a free-market approach that assumes that consumers’ choices will help shape the market if consumers have accurate and adequate information and are not subject to perverse incentives.

Perfect (free-market) competition assumes the following conditions:

•  There are large numbers of buyers and sellers so that no one controls prices.

•  All buyers and sellers have complete and accurate information about the quality, availability, and prices of goods.

•  All products have available perfect substitutes.

•  All buyers and sellers are free to enter or leave the market at will.

Free-market ideology has been playing out in health care even in the absence of a real free market. It goes by a number of names—consumer-driven health care is one example, as is market-driven health care. Supporters of this approach call for much greater transparency and more consumer choice and responsibility. It has been implemented, in part, through innovations such as health savings accounts (HSAs) and private options for Medicare. Insurance exchanges are another manifestation of this approach and were initially suggested by conservative think tanks that support a free-market approach.

3.2 A Chronology

Previous section

Next section

3.2 A CHRONOLOGY

Centuries ago, medical care was a religious calling, not a scientific field. The term hospice was more representative of health care institutions than hospital. Gradually, health care has become a calling and an industry. Well into the 20th century, U.S. physicians took whatever people could pay. Teaching institutions provided free care in return for allowing learners to work on those who could not pay. This system of combined fee-for-service and charity care existed before the Great Depression and World War II. From there, one can trace the development and gradual introduction of employment-based health insurance and prepaid group practices, leading to the establishment of health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and the industrialization of parts of the delivery system with the emergence of pharmaceutical giants, hospital chains, pharmacy chains, and large, integrated health care systems.

The Health “Insurance” Approach: Moving from Provider Monopoly Toward Provider/Insurer Oligopoly

Health insurance systems in the United States were implemented during the Great Depression to stabilize cash flows of providers. The concept existed in Europe much earlier (Starr, 1982). Many of the early systems in the United States evolved into the nonprofit Blue Cross/Blue Shield organizations.

Dr. Justin Ford Kimball, the administrator of Baylor Hospital in Dallas, is often credited with starting the U.S. medical insurance movement in 1929. He conceived of the idea of collecting “insurance premiums” in advance and guaranteeing the hospital’s service to members’ subscribing groups. Furthermore, he found a way to involve employers in the administration of the plan, thereby reducing expenses associated with marketing and enrollment. The first employer to work with Baylor Hospital was the Dallas school district, which enrolled schoolteachers and collected the biweekly premium of 50 cents (Richmond & Fein, 2005).

About the same time, prepaid group practices began in Oklahoma, but they were bitterly opposed by local medical societies. Prepaid group practices, forerunners of today’s HMOs and the organizations identified in the ACA as accountable care organizations (ACOs), were also established to provide stable cash flows, but remained a relatively minor factor for decades because of medical society opposition.

State hospital associations controlled the Blue Cross organizations, and medical societies controlled the Blue Shield organizations. Well into the 1940s, laws in 26 states prohibited anyone other than medical societies from offering prepayment plans for physician services. In 1934, the American Medical Association (AMA) set forth conditions that it argued should govern private insurance for physician services (Starr, 1982, pp. 299–300):

•  “All features of medical service in any method of medical practice should be under the control of the medical profession.” This included all medical care institutions, and thus, only the medical profession could determine their “adequacy and character.”

•  Patients were to have absolute freedom to choose a physician.

•  “A permanent, confidential relation between the patient and a ‘family physician’ must be the fundamental, dominating feature of any system.”

•  No form of insurance was acceptable that did not have the patient paying the physician and the patient being the one reimbursed.

•  Any plan in a locality must be open to all providers in a community.

•  Medical assistance aspects of a plan must only be available to those below the “comfort level” of income.

The Group Health Association of Washington, DC, a prepaid group practice, was established in 1937, but it faced strong opposition. In 1943, the Supreme Court (AMA v. U.S., 1943), hearing a case brought by the FTC, upheld a lower court finding that the AMA and the DC Medical Society were guilty of “a conspiracy in restraint of trade under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act” and had hindered and obstructed Group Health “in procuring and retaining on its staff qualified doctors” and “from privilege of consulting with others and using the facilities of hospitals” (Richmond & Fein, 2005, p. 34).

Expanding Participation

World War II led to the industrialization of all available nonmilitary hands, breaking the Great Depression, inducing migration from rural areas to industrial cities, increasing the power of industrial unions, and inaugurating the era of big science. It also led to an era of optimism that Americans could accomplish anything they wanted if they worked together collectively (Strauss & Howe, 1991).

Many employers had established their own health services to support their employees and the war effort. Some of these services evolved into prepaid group practices. Most notably, Kaiser Industries’ medical department became the Kaiser Permanente system, which was opened up to outside enrollees after the war. Similar systems, such as the Health Insurance Plan in New York, which started in 1947, sprang up independently.

The government imposed wage and price controls during World War II. As labor became scarce and the war turned in the Allies’ favor, workers pressed for better compensation. The Office of Price Administration held the line on wage increases, but allowed improved benefits through collective bargaining. This led to the rapid expansion of health insurance among unionized industrial and government workers. This trend was also consistent with the provision of medical benefits to the vast military establishment. Unemployment fell from 17.2% in 1939 to 1.3% in 1944, and the real gross national product grew by 75% (Richmond & Fein, 2005). Health insurance costs were not yet a serious concern for corporate managers or the government. In 1948, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that refusal to bargain over health care benefits was an unfair labor practice.

Collective bargaining became the basic vehicle for determining health benefits. Because union officers were elected by their membership, they did not choose catastrophic coverage. Rather, they sought to maximize the visibility of benefits to their rank-and-file (voting) members. This led them to bargain for first-dollar coverage for everyone and to support lifetime limitations on benefits for those who were born with or developed catastrophic or high-cost chronic conditions. It also led them to emphasize employment-related coverage for dependents. They wanted most union members to experience regular payouts from their benefit packages. If the workers were young and healthy, they would still see payment for services such as obstetric and pediatric care for their family members. Employers did not much care how their workers divided the contract settlements among wages, health benefits, and other fringes. Employers saw health insurance as an inconsequential component of the overall labor costs established through collective bargaining. If workers and their families already had individual health coverage, they still gained a tax advantage if the employer paid the premium directly. Blue Cross enrollments tripled between 1942 and 1946, while enrollment in commercial health insurance plans more than doubled (Becker, 1955).

Postwar Responses

Following World War II, most presidential administrations suggested health care reforms of some sort. The Hill-Burton Act of 1946 expanded hospital facilities. President Truman suggested developing a system of universal health insurance based on the report of the President’s Commission on Health Needs of the Nation; however, his proposal was opposed by entrenched interests and was ignored when President Eisenhower was elected. In 1950, Congress approved a grant program to the states to pay providers for medical care for people receiving public assistance. Proposals for a Medicare-type system under Social Security appeared in Congress as early as 1957, but it took 8 years of debate for Congress and the White House to reach a consensus.

The 1960 Kerr-Mills Act created a program administered by the Welfare Administration and the states for “Medical Assistance to the Aged,” which also covered “medically needy” older persons who did not necessarily need to qualify for public assistance. Richmond and Fein (2005) described Kerr-Mills as an attempt to stave off Medicare-type programs.

The Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health, formed under Eisenhower, did not issue its final report until 1961, under the Kennedy administration. It led to the passage of the Mental Retardation Facilities Construction Act of 1963 and the Community Mental Health Centers Act of 1963.

Early in his term, President Johnson announced the formation of a Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke. Its recommendations led to the Regional Medical Programs legislation to advance training and research. Congress, however, added a provision that this work was not to interfere in any way with “patterns and methods of financing medical care, professional practice, or the administration of any existing institutions” (Richmond & Fein, 2005, p. 44).

While the Medicare debate continued, Congress passed many health measures as part of Johnson’s War on Poverty. Given the highly visible opposition of organized medicine, the health components of these new programs were housed outside of the U.S. Public Health Service. For example, the Office of Economic Opportunity started neighborhood health centers, and its Head Start program provided health assessment and health care components for children.

When the Johnson administration finally secured passage of the Social Security Amendments of 1965, it accommodated AMA concerns by offering three separate programs: (1) Medicare Part A, which provided hospital coverage for most older persons; (2) Medicare Part B, a voluntary supplementary medical insurance program; and (3) Medicaid, which expanded the Kerr-Mills program to help with out-of-pocket expenses such as nursing home care and drugs and extended potential eligibility to families with children, the blind, and the disabled under the Welfare Administration. Starr (2011) cites this set of programs as the beginning of the “policy trap” that haunts us today:

The key elements of the trap are a system of employer-provided insurance that conceals true costs from those who benefit from it; targeted government programs that protect groups such as the elderly and veterans, who are well organized and enjoy wide public sympathy and believe, unlike other claimants, that they have earned their benefits; and a financing system that has expanded and enriched the healthcare industry, creating powerful interests averse to change. (p. 123)

There were other compromises in the Social Security Amendments. For example, at the time, hospital-based physicians were being placed on salary so that hospitals could use some of their fee revenue to cover the capital costs of their practices. The 1965 Medicare bill specifically required that anesthesiologists, radiologists, and pathologists be paid directly, not through the hospital. That law also stated, “Nothing in this title shall be construed to authorize any federal officer or employee to exercise any supervision or control over the practice of medicine.” Some have questioned whether the government’s current 1.5% pay-for-performance bonus program violates this provision (Pear, 2006).

Bodenheimer and Grumbach (2005) labeled the years 1945 to 1970 as those of the “provider-insurer pact” (p. 167). Starr (1982) argued that the period before 1970 was characterized by an accommodation between the in

Effects of Current Health Policies


Chapter 1

Introduction

If everyone is in charge, then no one is in charge. Health policy is problematic throughout the world, but it is particularly challenging in the United States, where there is no consensus about which government agency or social institution, if any, has an accepted, legitimate role of developing or implementing national health policy. The U.S. Constitution is silent on the subject of health and health care. Although its preamble promises “to promote the general Welfare,” the Tenth Amendment states, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Neither education nor health care powers are specifically allotted to the federal government in the Constitution. The omission of health, however, cannot be attributed solely to the framers’ intent, despite the presence of three physicians at the Constitutional Convention. They lived in a world of “evil humours” where one visited “barbers and churgeons.”

Constitutional issues almost derailed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 before the Supreme Court. In 2012, the Court, by a 5–4 vote, upheld the constitutionality of the “individual mandate” provisions that require most individuals to carry basic health insurance or pay a penalty on their income tax return. At the same time, it overturned a provision requiring states to expand Medicaid access, ruling that it was unconstitutional because it did not provide states enough latitude.

President after president has pushed for an overhaul to our health care system and remedies to the access problems it creates. Only Lyndon Johnson and Barack Obama have succeeded. Attempts by Truman, Eisenhower, Nixon, and Clinton were less successful. In the more recent past, the rapid growth of health care costs has expanded the policy debate, as has growing recognition of medical errors and other quality problems. In the meantime, policy analysts struggle to make progress with a highly fragmented system and a divided body politic.

1.1 THE MANY ACTORS

Policy decisions are made at multiple levels of U.S. society:

•  National government

•  State and local governments

•  Health care institutions

•  Provider professionals

•  Payer organizations (employers and insurers)

•  Employers (meeting the mandate)

•  Individuals (consumers)


Tables 1-2
 through 
1-7
, which are distributed throughout this chapter, provide samples of major health policy questions faced in each of these domains. Like most tables and lists in this text, they are meant to be illustrative, not exhaustive.

In such a decentralized environment, government may take a hands-on approach, treating health care as a public good, as it does transportation and education, or a hands-off approach, favoring market-driven outcomes. Therefore, government’s stance and specific policies may swing dramatically as political power shifts. For example, during the 2012 presidential campaign, one side vowed to repeal the ACA if it gained complete control of the political process, undoing a major accomplishment of the Obama administration. Sharp changes in public attitudes are not unknown. The 1988 Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act had a favorable rating with the public when passed, but was repealed in November 1989 as the public, especially the wealthier elderly, learned more about it.

This chapter describes what health care policy is, how the policy analysis process works, and the different roles health professionals can play in setting and implementing health policy over time. The role of a policy analyst is described quite completely in the excerpt from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management Operating Manual displayed in 
Table 1-1
. As you proceed through the text, you will likely note many parallels between that role description and the organization of this text, even though this text is meant to outline health policy analysis for health care professionals rather than cover the full training needs for a career in policy analysis. We then provide an overview of some of the major policy issues facing health care in this country. Finally, we address how certain potentially confusing terms are employed throughout this text and suggest ways to integrate the material that you will be learning with your knowledge from other disciplines.

Table 1-1 Excerpts from the Office of Personnel Management Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions—Policy Analysis Positions

•  Knowledge of a pertinent professional subject-matter field(s). Typically there is a direct, even critical, relationship between the possession of subject-matter expertise and successful performance of analytical assignments.

•  Knowledge of economic theories including micro-economics and the effect of proposed policies on production costs and prices, wages, resource allocations, or consumer behavior; and/or macro-economics and the effect of proposed policies on income and employment, investment, interest rates, and price level.

•  Knowledge of public policy issues related to a subject-matter field.

•  Knowledge of the executive/legislative decision making process.

•  Knowledge of pertinent research and analytical methodology and ability to apply such techniques to policy issues, such as:

•  Qualitative techniques, such as performing extensive inquiry into a wide variety of significant issues, problems, or proposals; determining data sources and relevance of findings and synthesizing information; evaluating tentative study findings and drawing logical conclusions; and identifying omissions, questionable assumptions, or inadequate data in the analytical work of others.

•  Quantitative methods, such as cost benefit analysis, design of computer simulation models and statistical analysis including survey methods and regression analysis.

•  Knowledge of the programs or organizations and activities to assess the political and institutional environment in which decisions are made and implemented.

•  Skill in dealing with decision makers and their immediate staffs. Skill in interacting with other specialists and experts in the same or related fields.

•  Ability to exercise judgment in all phases of analysis, ranging from sorting out the most important problems when dealing with voluminous amounts of information to ensure that the many facets of a policy issue are explored, to sifting evidence and developing feasible options or alternative proposals and anticipating policy consequences.

•  Skill in effectively communicating highly complex technical material or highly complex issues that may have controversial findings, or both, using language appropriate to specialists and/or nonspecialists, facilitating the formulation of a decision.

•  Skill in written communication to organize ideas and present findings in a logical manner with supporting, as well as adverse, criteria for specific issues, and to prepare material complicated by short deadlines and limited information.

•  Skill in effective oral communication techniques to explain, justify, or discuss a variety of public issues requiring a logical presentation of appropriate facts and information or analysis.

•  Ability to work effectively under the pressure of tight time frames and rigid deadlines.

Source: Reproduced from: http://www.opm.gov/qualifications/standards/Specialty-Stds/gs-policy.asp; accessed 12/01/12. For more detail see Section IV-A (pp33-34) of the Operational Manual for Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions.

Table 1-2 Illustrative Health Policy Issues at the U.S. Federal Level

•  How should otherwise healthy people be motivated to participate in health insurance programs, thus lowering the average premium?

•  What population groups should receive subsidized coverage from tax revenues?

•  Because the Constitution does not include the topic of health care as a federal responsibility, how should the federal government participate in supporting health care for all?

•  How should the federal government support quality improvement efforts if state boards are not effectively addressing medical error rates?

•  The cost of malpractice insurance in some states threatens the supply of providers in some specialties and appears to raise the cost of care, so what is the role of the federal government in avoiding the negative effects of malpractice lawsuits?

•  Progress in information technology implementation in health care has lagged behind most other information-intensive service sectors. Are the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act sufficient to overcome this problem?

•  What services should be covered under Medicare? Medicaid?

•  How many health professionals in a subspecialty are sufficient? Armed with the right answer, what should we being doing about any shortages? About any surpluses?

1.2 Health Care: What Is It?

Previous section

Next section

1.2 HEALTH CARE: WHAT IS IT?

The terms health and health care are used loosely in U.S. policy debates. Often what people mean by health is an absence of notable ailments. The World Health Organization (2005), however, defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Similarly, when people utter the phrase the health care system, they often are talking about the system for financing and delivering personal medical services—what some refer to as illness care and we will refer to primarily as the medical care system. The entire system that promotes health and wellness is actually much more complex. Other health systems include public health, mental health, and oral health. Moreover, much of our health is the result of social determinants, such as housing, education, social capital, our natural environment, and the way we construct the built environment around us. These are shaped by policy decisions made outside the health care system.

Thinking about health in terms of population outcomes can dramatically shift the way problems are defined and addressed. One example is identifying the leading causes of death. Using a disease model, the leading killers are ailments such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, injury, and lung disease, but McGinnis and Foege (1993), using a population-based, prevention-oriented perspective, identified the “real causes of death” as behaviors such as tobacco use, improper diet, lack of physical activity, and alcohol misuse. They argued that 88% of what we spend on health nationally pays for access to medical care, but in terms of influence on health status, medical care accounts for a mere 10%. This view attributes 50% of our health status to our behaviors, 20% to genetics, and 20% to environmental factors. Yet only 4% of health spending has been going to promote healthy behaviors and 8% to all other nonmedical health-related activities (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2000). Since the mid-1960s, public health spending as a percentage of overall spending on health care has fluctuated between 1% and 1.5% (Frist, 2002), and yet 25 years of the 30-year increase in life expectancy between 1900 and 1995 can be attributed to public health interventions.

Some examples used to illustrate points throughout this text draw on material from outside the realm of medical care finance and delivery. One case study discusses folic acid fortification of foods, an example of a population-based public health intervention. This text, however, focuses mostly on access, cost, and quality issues related to personal medical services. That is because the primary intended audience is health care professionals (people who operate primarily from within the medical care system) and also the simple fact that the United States is currently wrestling with many critical issues related to health care access cost and quality. Readers are urged, however, to keep that intentional bias in mind and to think about how a big-picture view of health might change the way problems and solutions are identified. For instance, one reform proposal currently in vogue, and discussed in several places in this text, is pay for performance, also known as pay for quality. Pay-for-performance programs provide financial incentives for providers to meet certain process and outcome measures. Kindig (2006, p. 2611) has proposed a “pay-for-population health performance system” that “would go beyond medical care to include financial incentives for the equally essential nonmedical care determinants of population health.”

Table 1-3 Illustrative Health Policy Issues at State and Local Levels

•  What services should be provided and to whom under Medicaid options and waivers?

•  How should the professional licensure be conducted so as to encourage quality of care, adequate access, and appropriate competition?

•  How should the public university system decide how many professionals to train to ensure adequate access to all sections of the state? To all target groups?

•  How aggressive should our state be in implementing and supporting health insurance exchanges?

•  What should be the roles of the state insurance regulations and oversight boards in ensuring access to care for the general public and for special populations?

•  Should the curative health care system, the mental health system, and public health clinics be merged as health care access becomes universal?

•  What are intended and unintended consequences of sex education policies on health and health services?

•  How do we undertake health care emergency planning for responses to floods, earthquakes, pandemics, and terrorism? What is the relationship between the state systems (public health and military) and local first responders?

1.3 Health Policy: What Is It?

Previous section

Next section

1.3 HEALTH POLICY: WHAT IS IT?

Beyond the scope issues just described, most of us are clear on what health policy is about in general terms. Simply stated, health policy addresses questions such as:

•  Where are we with our health care?

•  How did we get here?

•  Where do we want to be?

•  What other alternatives are available here and throughout the world?

•  What is likely to work in the future given our political process?

•  What roles should health professionals and ordinary citizens play in this process?

•  How can we become better prepared for such roles?

We cannot expect any representative cross section of participants to agree on the answers to all of these questions because their interests often conflict. A goal of this text is to encourage development of an objective, managerial approach to decision making—one that uses precise definitions of terms and relationships and carefully considers the key issues (and walks in the shoes of key actors) before reaching individual conclusions. Readers should come away with a set of tools for interpreting and analyzing events, situations, and alternatives—tools that can add to the skills already developed through professional training and experience. No one need abandon what has worked, but we hope to empower analysts to do a better job using a broader array of methods that fit a greater variety of situations.

Table 1-4 Illustrative Health Policy Issues for Health Care Institutions

•  How much charitable (uncompensated) care should we provide beyond that which is mandated?

•  What should be our health information technology strategy?

•  Should we undertake joint planning for future services with our local health department?

•  How should we go about increasing the proportion of the local population who volunteer as local organ donors?

•  Can we rationalize the services provided by local providers, reducing duplication and waste, and still avoid charges of anticompetitive practices?

•  What should we be doing to become an effective learning organization?

1.4 The Policy Analysis Process

Previous section

Next section

1.4 THE POLICY ANALYSIS PROCESS

The policy analysis process usually involves the following activities:

•  Problem identification. Why do we think we need to evaluate and possibly change the way we do things? What kinds of actions are people asking for? What are the drivers that require that scarce resources be devoted to this policy area? What is the intended output? What is the expected result?

•  Process definition. What is the current situation? What concerns are people citing? Why are current results unsatisfactory to some? What is being done about it? Who are the current actors, and what are their roles? Are people framing the issue effectively? What are reasonable expectations for results over a relevant time horizon?

•  Process analysis. What is happening in practice? How are outputs and outcomes measured, and why? What are interested parties recommending? What are the resource inputs? Are they appropriate? Are the outputs distributed fairly? Policy analysis can be approached rationally using a consistent set of steps:

•  Map out the existing processes that yield the outputs and outcomes of concern in as much detail as necessary to be operational.

•  Generate a list of solution strategies and narrow it to viable alternatives.

•  Map out the best processes for the more promising alternatives.

•  Ask where, how, and when new technologies might change each process within the relevant time horizon.

•  Determine the resource requirements of the most promising alternatives and then cost them.

•  Calculate other process parameters, such as lives saved, hospital days avoided, or persons served.

•  Qualitative analysis.

Effects of Current Health Policies

Chapter 3 How Did We Get Here?


Previous section


Next section


Chapter 3

How Did We Get Here?

A history of health care policy making in the United States could well start in 1791 with the passage of the Bill of Rights. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution declares that those powers not expressly given to the federal government belong to state and local governments. Health and education were not expressly given to the federal government. In 1910, the Supreme Court ruled that a federal workers’ compensation system was unconstitutional. Each state then established its own system. Hadler (2013) cites this as the regulatory template for the U.S. health insurance program as it developed much later. This issue played out again in June 2012 when the Supreme Court narrowly upheld part, but not all, of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).

With minor exceptions, the federal government has limited its role to financing national programs of health and education, rather than delivering services directly. Federal involvement has been justified under the welfare clause of the Constitution and also through Thomas Jefferson’s argument of implied powers. Yet the federal share of health expenditures is fast approaching half the direct cost of care, even without counting individual tax deductions for health care spending and insurance premiums and corporate deductions for employee health insurance premiums. Tax subsidies, health insurance provided to government employees, and public dollars spent on health at all levels of government account for close to 60% of all health spending.

This chapter looks at the coevolution of two separate, but linked, U.S. health systems—one for delivering medical care and one for financing it. Financing, especially the health insurance system, has impacted delivery systems; for instance, it has created incentives for overutilization or underutilization. Separate health insurance systems exist to cover expenses for dental, vision, and long-term care. Public health is financed primarily through state, local, and federal dollars obtained through taxes and fees.

3.1 Contending Visions of a System for D…


Previous section


Next section

3.1 CONTENDING VISIONS OF A SYSTEM FOR DELIVERING HEALTH CARE

Conflicts between different visions of how the health system should operate have dominated U.S. health care policy making. Different ideas have been more or less dominant at different times. Yet there has not been a dominant viewpoint since the 1960s, and all of the contending approaches have remained on the table. Each ideology or philosophy falls along the continuum of alternatives represented in 
Figure 3-1
. Five potential characterizations of the health care market are presented. One, a provider monopoly, has been ruled out by our legal system, even though it may best describe the U.S. health system as it existed between World Wars I and II (Starr, 1982). A monopoly occurs when the market for a product or service is controlled by a single provider, and in most cases is illegal. A monopsony exists when a single buyer controls a market. The extreme monopsony position can be represented by the original version of the United Kingdom’s National Health Service. This model is not currently a realistic contender for adoption in the United States either.

Oligopolistic competition involves a relatively open market dominated by a few large sellers and is a characteristic of many U.S. industrial sectors. Usually, three or four major sources for goods or services exist, and those sources control at least 40% of the market. In health care, two, three, or four providers often control state or local markets in the absence of a national market. National oligopolies appear to exist in many markets, such as pharmacy benefits management, Medicare managed care, replacement joints, imaging equipment, and pharmaceuticals distribution. Two or three hospital groups often control most of the relevant local market. Concentration in hospital markets has been increasing sharply enough to become a concern of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Although available studies of hospital concentration can yield conflicting findings (Gaynor, 2006), there can be little doubt that concentration increases pricing power. In many state markets the same is true of health insurance providers. Yet it is widely believed that market power has shifted in recent years from insurers to providers, especially larger hospitals and their associated group practices.

images

Figure 3-1 Stages of health care market power.

Starr (2011) describes the process leading up to the passage of the ACA as one of reaching a compromise between administered competition and consumer-driven health care, but the legislation was crafted to be minimally invasive to encourage support from interests such as hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and the insurance industry.

Administered competition implies that there are multiple suppliers but that the market is strongly influenced by a primary (but not exclusive) buyer, usually a government creation. It may involve universal coverage, a single payer, and/or a single underwriter.

Consumer-driven health care is more of a free-market approach that assumes that consumers’ choices will help shape the market if consumers have accurate and adequate information and are not subject to perverse incentives.

Perfect (free-market) competition assumes the following conditions:

•  There are large numbers of buyers and sellers so that no one controls prices.

•  All buyers and sellers have complete and accurate information about the quality, availability, and prices of goods.

•  All products have available perfect substitutes.

•  All buyers and sellers are free to enter or leave the market at will.

Free-market ideology has been playing out in health care even in the absence of a real free market. It goes by a number of names—consumer-driven health care is one example, as is market-driven health care. Supporters of this approach call for much greater transparency and more consumer choice and responsibility. It has been implemented, in part, through innovations such as health savings accounts (HSAs) and private options for Medicare. Insurance exchanges are another manifestation of this approach and were initially suggested by conservative think tanks that support a free-market approach.

3.2 A Chronology

Previous section

Next section

3.2 A CHRONOLOGY

Centuries ago, medical care was a religious calling, not a scientific field. The term hospice was more representative of health care institutions than hospital. Gradually, health care has become a calling and an industry. Well into the 20th century, U.S. physicians took whatever people could pay. Teaching institutions provided free care in return for allowing learners to work on those who could not pay. This system of combined fee-for-service and charity care existed before the Great Depression and World War II. From there, one can trace the development and gradual introduction of employment-based health insurance and prepaid group practices, leading to the establishment of health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and the industrialization of parts of the delivery system with the emergence of pharmaceutical giants, hospital chains, pharmacy chains, and large, integrated health care systems.

The Health “Insurance” Approach: Moving from Provider Monopoly Toward Provider/Insurer Oligopoly

Health insurance systems in the United States were implemented during the Great Depression to stabilize cash flows of providers. The concept existed in Europe much earlier (Starr, 1982). Many of the early systems in the United States evolved into the nonprofit Blue Cross/Blue Shield organizations.

Dr. Justin Ford Kimball, the administrator of Baylor Hospital in Dallas, is often credited with starting the U.S. medical insurance movement in 1929. He conceived of the idea of collecting “insurance premiums” in advance and guaranteeing the hospital’s service to members’ subscribing groups. Furthermore, he found a way to involve employers in the administration of the plan, thereby reducing expenses associated with marketing and enrollment. The first employer to work with Baylor Hospital was the Dallas school district, which enrolled schoolteachers and collected the biweekly premium of 50 cents (Richmond & Fein, 2005).

About the same time, prepaid group practices began in Oklahoma, but they were bitterly opposed by local medical societies. Prepaid group practices, forerunners of today’s HMOs and the organizations identified in the ACA as accountable care organizations (ACOs), were also established to provide stable cash flows, but remained a relatively minor factor for decades because of medical society opposition.

State hospital associations controlled the Blue Cross organizations, and medical societies controlled the Blue Shield organizations. Well into the 1940s, laws in 26 states prohibited anyone other than medical societies from offering prepayment plans for physician services. In 1934, the American Medical Association (AMA) set forth conditions that it argued should govern private insurance for physician services (Starr, 1982, pp. 299–300):

•  “All features of medical service in any method of medical practice should be under the control of the medical profession.” This included all medical care institutions, and thus, only the medical profession could determine their “adequacy and character.”

•  Patients were to have absolute freedom to choose a physician.

•  “A permanent, confidential relation between the patient and a ‘family physician’ must be the fundamental, dominating feature of any system.”

•  No form of insurance was acceptable that did not have the patient paying the physician and the patient being the one reimbursed.

•  Any plan in a locality must be open to all providers in a community.

•  Medical assistance aspects of a plan must only be available to those below the “comfort level” of income.

The Group Health Association of Washington, DC, a prepaid group practice, was established in 1937, but it faced strong opposition. In 1943, the Supreme Court (AMA v. U.S., 1943), hearing a case brought by the FTC, upheld a lower court finding that the AMA and the DC Medical Society were guilty of “a conspiracy in restraint of trade under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act” and had hindered and obstructed Group Health “in procuring and retaining on its staff qualified doctors” and “from privilege of consulting with others and using the facilities of hospitals” (Richmond & Fein, 2005, p. 34).

Expanding Participation

World War II led to the industrialization of all available nonmilitary hands, breaking the Great Depression, inducing migration from rural areas to industrial cities, increasing the power of industrial unions, and inaugurating the era of big science. It also led to an era of optimism that Americans could accomplish anything they wanted if they worked together collectively (Strauss & Howe, 1991).

Many employers had established their own health services to support their employees and the war effort. Some of these services evolved into prepaid group practices. Most notably, Kaiser Industries’ medical department became the Kaiser Permanente system, which was opened up to outside enrollees after the war. Similar systems, such as the Health Insurance Plan in New York, which started in 1947, sprang up independently.

The government imposed wage and price controls during World War II. As labor became scarce and the war turned in the Allies’ favor, workers pressed for better compensation. The Office of Price Administration held the line on wage increases, but allowed improved benefits through collective bargaining. This led to the rapid expansion of health insurance among unionized industrial and government workers. This trend was also consistent with the provision of medical benefits to the vast military establishment. Unemployment fell from 17.2% in 1939 to 1.3% in 1944, and the real gross national product grew by 75% (Richmond & Fein, 2005). Health insurance costs were not yet a serious concern for corporate managers or the government. In 1948, the National Labor Relations Board ruled that refusal to bargain over health care benefits was an unfair labor practice.

Collective bargaining became the basic vehicle for determining health benefits. Because union officers were elected by their membership, they did not choose catastrophic coverage. Rather, they sought to maximize the visibility of benefits to their rank-and-file (voting) members. This led them to bargain for first-dollar coverage for everyone and to support lifetime limitations on benefits for those who were born with or developed catastrophic or high-cost chronic conditions. It also led them to emphasize employment-related coverage for dependents. They wanted most union members to experience regular payouts from their benefit packages. If the workers were young and healthy, they would still see payment for services such as obstetric and pediatric care for their family members. Employers did not much care how their workers divided the contract settlements among wages, health benefits, and other fringes. Employers saw health insurance as an inconsequential component of the overall labor costs established through collective bargaining. If workers and their families already had individual health coverage, they still gained a tax advantage if the employer paid the premium directly. Blue Cross enrollments tripled between 1942 and 1946, while enrollment in commercial health insurance plans more than doubled (Becker, 1955).

Postwar Responses

Following World War II, most presidential administrations suggested health care reforms of some sort. The Hill-Burton Act of 1946 expanded hospital facilities. President Truman suggested developing a system of universal health insurance based on the report of the President’s Commission on Health Needs of the Nation; however, his proposal was opposed by entrenched interests and was ignored when President Eisenhower was elected. In 1950, Congress approved a grant program to the states to pay providers for medical care for people receiving public assistance. Proposals for a Medicare-type system under Social Security appeared in Congress as early as 1957, but it took 8 years of debate for Congress and the White House to reach a consensus.

The 1960 Kerr-Mills Act created a program administered by the Welfare Administration and the states for “Medical Assistance to the Aged,” which also covered “medically needy” older persons who did not necessarily need to qualify for public assistance. Richmond and Fein (2005) described Kerr-Mills as an attempt to stave off Medicare-type programs.

The Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health, formed under Eisenhower, did not issue its final report until 1961, under the Kennedy administration. It led to the passage of the Mental Retardation Facilities Construction Act of 1963 and the Community Mental Health Centers Act of 1963.

Early in his term, President Johnson announced the formation of a Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke. Its recommendations led to the Regional Medical Programs legislation to advance training and research. Congress, however, added a provision that this work was not to interfere in any way with “patterns and methods of financing medical care, professional practice, or the administration of any existing institutions” (Richmond & Fein, 2005, p. 44).

While the Medicare debate continued, Congress passed many health measures as part of Johnson’s War on Poverty. Given the highly visible opposition of organized medicine, the health components of these new programs were housed outside of the U.S. Public Health Service. For example, the Office of Economic Opportunity started neighborhood health centers, and its Head Start program provided health assessment and health care components for children.

When the Johnson administration finally secured passage of the Social Security Amendments of 1965, it accommodated AMA concerns by offering three separate programs: (1) Medicare Part A, which provided hospital coverage for most older persons; (2) Medicare Part B, a voluntary supplementary medical insurance program; and (3) Medicaid, which expanded the Kerr-Mills program to help with out-of-pocket expenses such as nursing home care and drugs and extended potential eligibility to families with children, the blind, and the disabled under the Welfare Administration. Starr (2011) cites this set of programs as the beginning of the “policy trap” that haunts us today:

The key elements of the trap are a system of employer-provided insurance that conceals true costs from those who benefit from it; targeted government programs that protect groups such as the elderly and veterans, who are well organized and enjoy wide public sympathy and believe, unlike other claimants, that they have earned their benefits; and a financing system that has expanded and enriched the healthcare industry, creating powerful interests averse to change. (p. 123)

There were other compromises in the Social Security Amendments. For example, at the time, hospital-based physicians were being placed on salary so that hospitals could use some of their fee revenue to cover the capital costs of their practices. The 1965 Medicare bill specifically required that anesthesiologists, radiologists, and pathologists be paid directly, not through the hospital. That law also stated, “Nothing in this title shall be construed to authorize any federal officer or employee to exercise any supervision or control over the practice of medicine.” Some have questioned whether the government’s current 1.5% pay-for-performance bonus program violates this provision (Pear, 2006).

Bodenheimer and Grumbach (2005) labeled the years 1945 to 1970 as those of the “provider-insurer pact” (p. 167). Starr (1982) argued that the period before 1970 was characterized by an accommodation between the in

Effects of Current Health Policies


Chapter 1

Introduction

If everyone is in charge, then no one is in charge. Health policy is problematic throughout the world, but it is particularly challenging in the United States, where there is no consensus about which government agency or social institution, if any, has an accepted, legitimate role of developing or implementing national health policy. The U.S. Constitution is silent on the subject of health and health care. Although its preamble promises “to promote the general Welfare,” the Tenth Amendment states, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Neither education nor health care powers are specifically allotted to the federal government in the Constitution. The omission of health, however, cannot be attributed solely to the framers’ intent, despite the presence of three physicians at the Constitutional Convention. They lived in a world of “evil humours” where one visited “barbers and churgeons.”

Constitutional issues almost derailed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 before the Supreme Court. In 2012, the Court, by a 5–4 vote, upheld the constitutionality of the “individual mandate” provisions that require most individuals to carry basic health insurance or pay a penalty on their income tax return. At the same time, it overturned a provision requiring states to expand Medicaid access, ruling that it was unconstitutional because it did not provide states enough latitude.

President after president has pushed for an overhaul to our health care system and remedies to the access problems it creates. Only Lyndon Johnson and Barack Obama have succeeded. Attempts by Truman, Eisenhower, Nixon, and Clinton were less successful. In the more recent past, the rapid growth of health care costs has expanded the policy debate, as has growing recognition of medical errors and other quality problems. In the meantime, policy analysts struggle to make progress with a highly fragmented system and a divided body politic.

1.1 THE MANY ACTORS

Policy decisions are made at multiple levels of U.S. society:

•  National government

•  State and local governments

•  Health care institutions

•  Provider professionals

•  Payer organizations (employers and insurers)

•  Employers (meeting the mandate)

•  Individuals (consumers)


Tables 1-2
 through 
1-7
, which are distributed throughout this chapter, provide samples of major health policy questions faced in each of these domains. Like most tables and lists in this text, they are meant to be illustrative, not exhaustive.

In such a decentralized environment, government may take a hands-on approach, treating health care as a public good, as it does transportation and education, or a hands-off approach, favoring market-driven outcomes. Therefore, government’s stance and specific policies may swing dramatically as political power shifts. For example, during the 2012 presidential campaign, one side vowed to repeal the ACA if it gained complete control of the political process, undoing a major accomplishment of the Obama administration. Sharp changes in public attitudes are not unknown. The 1988 Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act had a favorable rating with the public when passed, but was repealed in November 1989 as the public, especially the wealthier elderly, learned more about it.

This chapter describes what health care policy is, how the policy analysis process works, and the different roles health professionals can play in setting and implementing health policy over time. The role of a policy analyst is described quite completely in the excerpt from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management Operating Manual displayed in 
Table 1-1
. As you proceed through the text, you will likely note many parallels between that role description and the organization of this text, even though this text is meant to outline health policy analysis for health care professionals rather than cover the full training needs for a career in policy analysis. We then provide an overview of some of the major policy issues facing health care in this country. Finally, we address how certain potentially confusing terms are employed throughout this text and suggest ways to integrate the material that you will be learning with your knowledge from other disciplines.

Table 1-1 Excerpts from the Office of Personnel Management Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions—Policy Analysis Positions

•  Knowledge of a pertinent professional subject-matter field(s). Typically there is a direct, even critical, relationship between the possession of subject-matter expertise and successful performance of analytical assignments.

•  Knowledge of economic theories including micro-economics and the effect of proposed policies on production costs and prices, wages, resource allocations, or consumer behavior; and/or macro-economics and the effect of proposed policies on income and employment, investment, interest rates, and price level.

•  Knowledge of public policy issues related to a subject-matter field.

•  Knowledge of the executive/legislative decision making process.

•  Knowledge of pertinent research and analytical methodology and ability to apply such techniques to policy issues, such as:

•  Qualitative techniques, such as performing extensive inquiry into a wide variety of significant issues, problems, or proposals; determining data sources and relevance of findings and synthesizing information; evaluating tentative study findings and drawing logical conclusions; and identifying omissions, questionable assumptions, or inadequate data in the analytical work of others.

•  Quantitative methods, such as cost benefit analysis, design of computer simulation models and statistical analysis including survey methods and regression analysis.

•  Knowledge of the programs or organizations and activities to assess the political and institutional environment in which decisions are made and implemented.

•  Skill in dealing with decision makers and their immediate staffs. Skill in interacting with other specialists and experts in the same or related fields.

•  Ability to exercise judgment in all phases of analysis, ranging from sorting out the most important problems when dealing with voluminous amounts of information to ensure that the many facets of a policy issue are explored, to sifting evidence and developing feasible options or alternative proposals and anticipating policy consequences.

•  Skill in effectively communicating highly complex technical material or highly complex issues that may have controversial findings, or both, using language appropriate to specialists and/or nonspecialists, facilitating the formulation of a decision.

•  Skill in written communication to organize ideas and present findings in a logical manner with supporting, as well as adverse, criteria for specific issues, and to prepare material complicated by short deadlines and limited information.

•  Skill in effective oral communication techniques to explain, justify, or discuss a variety of public issues requiring a logical presentation of appropriate facts and information or analysis.

•  Ability to work effectively under the pressure of tight time frames and rigid deadlines.

Source: Reproduced from: http://www.opm.gov/qualifications/standards/Specialty-Stds/gs-policy.asp; accessed 12/01/12. For more detail see Section IV-A (pp33-34) of the Operational Manual for Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions.

Table 1-2 Illustrative Health Policy Issues at the U.S. Federal Level

•  How should otherwise healthy people be motivated to participate in health insurance programs, thus lowering the average premium?

•  What population groups should receive subsidized coverage from tax revenues?

•  Because the Constitution does not include the topic of health care as a federal responsibility, how should the federal government participate in supporting health care for all?

•  How should the federal government support quality improvement efforts if state boards are not effectively addressing medical error rates?

•  The cost of malpractice insurance in some states threatens the supply of providers in some specialties and appears to raise the cost of care, so what is the role of the federal government in avoiding the negative effects of malpractice lawsuits?

•  Progress in information technology implementation in health care has lagged behind most other information-intensive service sectors. Are the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act sufficient to overcome this problem?

•  What services should be covered under Medicare? Medicaid?

•  How many health professionals in a subspecialty are sufficient? Armed with the right answer, what should we being doing about any shortages? About any surpluses?

1.2 Health Care: What Is It?

Previous section

Next section

1.2 HEALTH CARE: WHAT IS IT?

The terms health and health care are used loosely in U.S. policy debates. Often what people mean by health is an absence of notable ailments. The World Health Organization (2005), however, defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Similarly, when people utter the phrase the health care system, they often are talking about the system for financing and delivering personal medical services—what some refer to as illness care and we will refer to primarily as the medical care system. The entire system that promotes health and wellness is actually much more complex. Other health systems include public health, mental health, and oral health. Moreover, much of our health is the result of social determinants, such as housing, education, social capital, our natural environment, and the way we construct the built environment around us. These are shaped by policy decisions made outside the health care system.

Thinking about health in terms of population outcomes can dramatically shift the way problems are defined and addressed. One example is identifying the leading causes of death. Using a disease model, the leading killers are ailments such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, injury, and lung disease, but McGinnis and Foege (1993), using a population-based, prevention-oriented perspective, identified the “real causes of death” as behaviors such as tobacco use, improper diet, lack of physical activity, and alcohol misuse. They argued that 88% of what we spend on health nationally pays for access to medical care, but in terms of influence on health status, medical care accounts for a mere 10%. This view attributes 50% of our health status to our behaviors, 20% to genetics, and 20% to environmental factors. Yet only 4% of health spending has been going to promote healthy behaviors and 8% to all other nonmedical health-related activities (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2000). Since the mid-1960s, public health spending as a percentage of overall spending on health care has fluctuated between 1% and 1.5% (Frist, 2002), and yet 25 years of the 30-year increase in life expectancy between 1900 and 1995 can be attributed to public health interventions.

Some examples used to illustrate points throughout this text draw on material from outside the realm of medical care finance and delivery. One case study discusses folic acid fortification of foods, an example of a population-based public health intervention. This text, however, focuses mostly on access, cost, and quality issues related to personal medical services. That is because the primary intended audience is health care professionals (people who operate primarily from within the medical care system) and also the simple fact that the United States is currently wrestling with many critical issues related to health care access cost and quality. Readers are urged, however, to keep that intentional bias in mind and to think about how a big-picture view of health might change the way problems and solutions are identified. For instance, one reform proposal currently in vogue, and discussed in several places in this text, is pay for performance, also known as pay for quality. Pay-for-performance programs provide financial incentives for providers to meet certain process and outcome measures. Kindig (2006, p. 2611) has proposed a “pay-for-population health performance system” that “would go beyond medical care to include financial incentives for the equally essential nonmedical care determinants of population health.”

Table 1-3 Illustrative Health Policy Issues at State and Local Levels

•  What services should be provided and to whom under Medicaid options and waivers?

•  How should the professional licensure be conducted so as to encourage quality of care, adequate access, and appropriate competition?

•  How should the public university system decide how many professionals to train to ensure adequate access to all sections of the state? To all target groups?

•  How aggressive should our state be in implementing and supporting health insurance exchanges?

•  What should be the roles of the state insurance regulations and oversight boards in ensuring access to care for the general public and for special populations?

•  Should the curative health care system, the mental health system, and public health clinics be merged as health care access becomes universal?

•  What are intended and unintended consequences of sex education policies on health and health services?

•  How do we undertake health care emergency planning for responses to floods, earthquakes, pandemics, and terrorism? What is the relationship between the state systems (public health and military) and local first responders?

1.3 Health Policy: What Is It?

Previous section

Next section

1.3 HEALTH POLICY: WHAT IS IT?

Beyond the scope issues just described, most of us are clear on what health policy is about in general terms. Simply stated, health policy addresses questions such as:

•  Where are we with our health care?

•  How did we get here?

•  Where do we want to be?

•  What other alternatives are available here and throughout the world?

•  What is likely to work in the future given our political process?

•  What roles should health professionals and ordinary citizens play in this process?

•  How can we become better prepared for such roles?

We cannot expect any representative cross section of participants to agree on the answers to all of these questions because their interests often conflict. A goal of this text is to encourage development of an objective, managerial approach to decision making—one that uses precise definitions of terms and relationships and carefully considers the key issues (and walks in the shoes of key actors) before reaching individual conclusions. Readers should come away with a set of tools for interpreting and analyzing events, situations, and alternatives—tools that can add to the skills already developed through professional training and experience. No one need abandon what has worked, but we hope to empower analysts to do a better job using a broader array of methods that fit a greater variety of situations.

Table 1-4 Illustrative Health Policy Issues for Health Care Institutions

•  How much charitable (uncompensated) care should we provide beyond that which is mandated?

•  What should be our health information technology strategy?

•  Should we undertake joint planning for future services with our local health department?

•  How should we go about increasing the proportion of the local population who volunteer as local organ donors?

•  Can we rationalize the services provided by local providers, reducing duplication and waste, and still avoid charges of anticompetitive practices?

•  What should we be doing to become an effective learning organization?

1.4 The Policy Analysis Process

Previous section

Next section

1.4 THE POLICY ANALYSIS PROCESS

The policy analysis process usually involves the following activities:

•  Problem identification. Why do we think we need to evaluate and possibly change the way we do things? What kinds of actions are people asking for? What are the drivers that require that scarce resources be devoted to this policy area? What is the intended output? What is the expected result?

•  Process definition. What is the current situation? What concerns are people citing? Why are current results unsatisfactory to some? What is being done about it? Who are the current actors, and what are their roles? Are people framing the issue effectively? What are reasonable expectations for results over a relevant time horizon?

•  Process analysis. What is happening in practice? How are outputs and outcomes measured, and why? What are interested parties recommending? What are the resource inputs? Are they appropriate? Are the outputs distributed fairly? Policy analysis can be approached rationally using a consistent set of steps:

•  Map out the existing processes that yield the outputs and outcomes of concern in as much detail as necessary to be operational.

•  Generate a list of solution strategies and narrow it to viable alternatives.

•  Map out the best processes for the more promising alternatives.

•  Ask where, how, and when new technologies might change each process within the relevant time horizon.

•  Determine the resource requirements of the most promising alternatives and then cost them.

•  Calculate other process parameters, such as lives saved, hospital days avoided, or persons served.

•  Qualitative analysis.

Effects of Current Health Policies

 

Health policies must undergo policy processes of analysis prior to implementation. Pre-process, intra-process, and post-process all have major impacts on healthcare organizations and consumers. Based on the  policy many people may face economical or social change, which could either be  just/unjust. 

  • Evaluate the ACA’s impact on healthcare quality and cost.
  • How does the ACA impact society as a whole?
  • Highlight the relevance of the Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage (FMAP), as it relates to the ACA.

Effects of Current Health Policies

Chapter 4 Where Do We Want to Be?


Previous section


Next section


Chapter 4

Where Do We Want to Be?

Even in a country that lacks an overall, cohesive health policy, it is useful to ask: How unhappy are we with our health care, and what do we want to change? Do not expect consistent responses from the American public. When the nation was debating the Clinton health plan, a number of organizations surveyed the public. Respondents reported they believed that the health care system was in trouble. At the same time, they expressed satisfaction with their own largely employer-financed health care programs. Public support for universal coverage was strong, but individuals did not want to pay higher taxes to support it (Peterson, 1995). An ABC New/Washington Post poll in October 1993 showed the following (Schick, 1995):

•  51% of the public favored the Clinton health plan.

•  59% thought that it was better than the existing system.

•  Only 19% thought that their care would get better under it, and 34% thought worse care would result.

•  However, 57% were against tax increases to pay for it, whereas 40% would be willing to pay.

The American public also appears to be split over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as a whole. Data about opposition to the act can be misleading, with a significant portion of opposition coming from people who believe the ACA did not go far enough. They would prefer a public option, for example, or a single-payer system. Overall, the public is

negative about the individual mandate and the employer mandate, but is much in favor of the insurance changes that have been implemented. People are confused about the insurance exchange provisions of the act as well. An April 2013 tracking poll found that “about half the public says they do not have enough information about the health reform law to understand how it will impact their own family, a share that rises among the uninsured and low-income households” (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2013). The same poll reported that 42% of respondents did not know that the ACA was still the law of the land. Twelve percent believed it had been repealed by Congress, 7% believed it had been overturned by the Supreme Court, and 23% didn’t know whether it was still in effect or not.

Americans report being in good health more than any other OECD country. Their complaints are mostly about financial risks and to some extent access and waiting. A 2010 study of six developed countries showed that Americans were satisfied with their doctors and the availability of effective care, but were also more likely to report that the system needed to be completely rebuilt (Papanicolas, Cylus, & Smith, 2013).

4.1 Alignment with the Rest of Society

Previous section

Next section

4.1 ALIGNMENT WITH THE REST OF SOCIETY

The democratic process is likely to generate many policy experiments as we cope with advancing technology, changing demographics, political pressures, and economic fluctuations. These experiments will continue to stir debate about the merits of the many delivery and payment alternatives available in the United States and elsewhere.

For professionals in leadership positions, this is an unpleasant reality that makes it much harder to plan and implement any institutional strategy. Even the most prestigious institutions are affected by these external drivers. For example, the Finnish national orthopedic hospital, the Orton Hospital in Helsinki, had to downsize and reach out to private-pay individuals when the Finnish federal government chose to decentralize its jointly financed government health care program and pass administration on to local governments (Masalin, 1994). These local governments then attempted to control the rising cost of health care by reducing referrals to central specialized hospitals. Orton Hospital was a national resource of high-quality care, but as the referral patterns of the country changed, it, too, had to change the way it functioned in order to survive.

There is no universal, monolithic “we” when it comes health policy. There are interest groups, each of which has a central point of view. Within each group are many individuals with some diversity of views. They may be willing to compromise on some issues, but not on others. In the United States, much progressive legislation has been built by reaching agreement on means rather than on ends.

What Do Providers Want?

Providers are aware of their responsibility to act in the best interests of their patients. They are also inculcated with the “first do no harm” dictum. Even among the “disinterested” parties, some care most about individuals, whereas others focus on populations. This is often a vexing problem for those clinicians who, although committed to the needs of individual patients, are also trained in statistical thinking and population-based approaches.

Provider professionals want professional autonomy, income stability and growth comparable with their peers, successful outcomes for their patients, a sense of mastery of their field, and the respect of the public. They know that they will make some mistakes, but they will work very hard to avoid them. They do not want to put their careers on the line with every decision. They do not want to waste energy on bureaucratic exercises that consume resources and distract them from effective care. They also would like to see provisions to pay for care for the uninsured. They are aware that these individuals often forgo normal care and may end up later with more serious and costly problems. That is why some hospitals and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) have strongly endorsed state plans to cover the uninsured, even when they involve adding a tax on their charges to paying patients.

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has expressed some of these desires in its Bill of Rights for Registered Nurses (ANA, 2014). It addresses not only working conditions for nurses but also the right to provide “services that maintain respect for human dignity and embrace the uniqueness of each patient and the nature of his or her health problems, without restriction with regard to social or economic status.” The document says nurses must have the ability to meet their obligations to society and their patients, as well as meet their own needs. In addition, they have a right to workplaces that allow them to meet professional standards, act within their scope of practice, perform their duties in accordance with the ANA code of ethics, advocate for themselves as well as their patients, be safe, keep their patients safe, and negotiate their conditions of employment.

Professional Autonomy

The professional mystique of physicians in the past rested on their control of information. Those who favor a consumer-centric, free-market approach to health care decision making want to maximize the amount of information available to consumers. This has led many physicians to argue for privacy in the conduct of their practices, often in the name of protection of business secrets and personal privacy. Many physicians object, for example, to the fact that a drug company’s local sales representative has data on their prescribing behaviors (Saul, 2006). Insurers certainly profile physicians and institutions for costs and outcomes regularly, and aggregated data are increasingly available to employers, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), the Joint Commission, the federal government, and the general public. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released physician Medicaid income data in 2014.

Employer representatives want more information to be available to consumers. One thorny issue is information on individual physicians. President George W. Bush called for “transparency in the marketplace” and urged private insurers to disclose data on physician costs and outcomes; however, when the Business Roundtable called on the federal government to make its Medicare databases available, his administration cited a 1979 court ruling protecting the privacy of physicians and prohibiting disclosure of Medicare payments to individual physicians (Pear, 2006).

This is a difficult area. Professionals, like other businesspeople, have some rights to privacy and protections from the prying eyes of competitors, but some observers see the current tensions as the last gasp of a professional monopoly and an attempt to withhold information that bolsters purchaser sovereignty at all levels. Yet the public has difficulty interpreting this information effectively. Current techniques for evaluating case mix and adjusting for risk are crude at best. Measuring the outputs of medical interventions is difficult unless one knows that the inputs are comparable or unless there is a way to adjust the data to reflect differences in inputs, especially the condition of the patient going in.

Other professions fight to overcome the dominance of physicians. In many countries, pharmacists are freer to dispense independently. Nurse practitioners and midwives have fought state by state for the right to practice independently. Psychologists have been fighting some of the same battles with respect to prescribing for the mentally ill, and more and more types of counselors want to be able to bill Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance.

What Do Patients and Their Families Want?

Patients want to beat the odds. They and their families want the best possible outcomes, and they want to know that everything possible was done to ensure recovery (or a comfortable death) for their loved ones. Some want miracles. All want respect and caring. Most know that they need experts to look after their interests, but still want to be kept informed of what is going on so they can make sense of what is happening and avoid serious medical errors. Again, the issues are complex. Patients and families want to have access to quality information if they have the time and energy to make their own decisions. At the same time, they employ the provider as their agent, and the sicker they are, the more they tend rely on the clinician’s judgment.

When they are not terribly sick, they also worry about the cost of their care. They do not want to spend a lot of time in the waiting room or figuring out how to fill out paperwork. That is a nonmonetary cost, but a cost to them, nevertheless. It can also be a monetary cost if they lose work hours or reimbursement opportunities because of it.

They want to know that they were not treated unfairly by any part of the health care system and that their treatment was not affected by their gender, their ethnicity, or the color of their skin. They would like to think that it was not affected by the capacity of their pocketbooks, but probably believe that to be a bit unrealistic.

They also become apprehensive when they believe that profitability concerns or payment mechanisms are influencing which treatments they receive. An example has been the debate over whether the drugs chosen by oncologists for outpatient treatment have been chosen for their effectiveness or their profitability (Abelson, 2006a; Jacobson et al., 2006). Increasingly, patients are aware of the financial incentives affecting providers that in the long run can undermine provider legitimacy (Schlesinger, 2002).

Before passage and early implementation of the ACA, a strong concern of individuals was that they did not want to be denied insurance on the basis of prior medical conditions over which they had little or no control. The ACA specifically prohibits denial of coverage because of preexisting conditions. This provision became effective at the start of 2014.

Some individuals, particularly those sometimes referred to as the “young immortals,” have been willing to “go bare” (not carry health insurance) if they perceive a relatively low probability of a significantly costly health care event. This has raised the issue of free riders getting emergency care, even though they are not making provision for paying for it ahead of time. This is part of the impetus for the ACA mandate that all individuals obtain health insurance or pay an income tax penalty. An even thornier problem has been the moral hazard of those who knowingly indulge in high-risk behaviors for which the general public has had to pick up a share of the costs. The primary rationale for mandatory helmet laws, for example, was not to protect motorcyclists; it was to shelter the public from incurring the tremendous ongoing costs of caring for people with serious brain damage.

Individuals also worry about being bankrupted when they have insufficient insurance coverage for current and future situations. The ACA has dealt with this is a number of ways, including barring lifetime caps on claims. Yet consumers also worry about what the premium costs will do to their disposable income. Again, the ACA tries to deal with that by subsidizing the premiums of low-income workers.

What Do Insurers Want?

Insurers want to stay in business. That is why they fought so hard against any hint of a single-payer system and against the Obama administration proposal for a government health plan that would appear in the exchanges alongside the existing product lines (the public option).

Insurers want to be free to play the odds. They want to be able to make an acceptable level of net revenue whether they are a for-profit or a non-profit organization. They want to be able to compete in the marketplace on a “level playing field.” Their customers are the payers—the employers and the group and individual enrollees—and they want to maintain a good reputation with them. In the world of HMOs and preferred provider organizations (PPOs), insurers want the biggest possible discounts from providers to keep their medical loss ratios competitive.

Insurers also want to avoid adverse selection. They want protection against having those who know they have a higher-than-average probability of a claim from joining their system in disproportionate numbers. They also want to be able to attract those with a below-average probability of a claim. They do not want to be in a situation in which they are disadvantaged vis-à-vis other insurers. They would like to continue to compete on marketing skills, on underwriting ability, on investment returns on their reserves, and on their operating efficiencies.

Insurers, however, are very sensitive to market shifts. For example, many are currently developing new insurance products for individuals and small groups as the notion of consumer-oriented care and insurance exchanges increase consumer involvement in choosing products (and as employers reduce their contributions and coverage). They suddenly seem interested in individual subscribers that they ignored a few years ago. They are also interested in offering self-insurance plans to the small employers that they ignored previously.

What Do Employers Want?

Employers want to be able to recruit and retain competent, productive employees, and they want competitive cost structures. They are not in the health care purchasing business for any other reason. They are generally supportive of consumer-driven health care that allows individual consumers, rather than employers, insurers, or provider organizations, to make more decisions than in the past. This effectively shifts more of the costs onto the employees and from the lowest paid employees onto Medicaid. With the exchanges and the play-or-pay provisions of the ACA, they have many more options to consider, and it will be interesting to see what options they gravitate toward and for how long. Because the ACA’s employer contribution provisions apply to employers with 50 or more full-time employees, and full time has been defined as an average of 30 hours per week or at least 130 hours in a month, employers may choose to reduce the hours of workers to below 30 hours per week to keep their employee head count below that threshold.

Large Employers and Unions

In unionized firms, premium payments are set through collective bargaining between the company and the union. This bargaining can expand or contract the health care benefits, depending on the wants and needs of the employer and key groups within the union. After a period during which many of our bitterest strikes were waged over health benefit issues, both sides are now recognizing that employment-related health care costs can reduce domestic employment by encouraging companies to shift production to other countries. Employers are rapidly limiting their liabilities to specific dollar contributions toward health care for employees and retirees. Large firms and their unions are increasingly aligned in their desire to hold down costs and maintain coverage.

Small Employers

Because health care insurance bargaining power can be increased by pooling large numbers of beneficiaries, and because administrative costs and insurance prices are very sensitive to the number of individuals covered, small businesses find it hard to provide competitive health benefits to their workers. They need either subsidies or effective ways of pooling their people with others to make a viable enrollee population. Accomplishing this has been a major thrust of the ACA, which includes premium subsidies for small firms.

What Do Governments Want?

They want a satisfied public. They want health care expenditures to be predictable and at a level that does not disadvantage economic growth in both domestic and international competition. The system should work within the parameters of accepted cultural norms of equity and fairness so it does not foment unnecessary voter dissatisfaction. All levels of government want to keep costs down to avoid crowding out other programs or increasing taxpayer discontent. Federal, state, and local governments are also concerned about&nbs

Effects of Current Health Policies

Chapter 4 Where Do We Want to Be?


Previous section


Next section


Chapter 4

Where Do We Want to Be?

Even in a country that lacks an overall, cohesive health policy, it is useful to ask: How unhappy are we with our health care, and what do we want to change? Do not expect consistent responses from the American public. When the nation was debating the Clinton health plan, a number of organizations surveyed the public. Respondents reported they believed that the health care system was in trouble. At the same time, they expressed satisfaction with their own largely employer-financed health care programs. Public support for universal coverage was strong, but individuals did not want to pay higher taxes to support it (Peterson, 1995). An ABC New/Washington Post poll in October 1993 showed the following (Schick, 1995):

•  51% of the public favored the Clinton health plan.

•  59% thought that it was better than the existing system.

•  Only 19% thought that their care would get better under it, and 34% thought worse care would result.

•  However, 57% were against tax increases to pay for it, whereas 40% would be willing to pay.

The American public also appears to be split over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as a whole. Data about opposition to the act can be misleading, with a significant portion of opposition coming from people who believe the ACA did not go far enough. They would prefer a public option, for example, or a single-payer system. Overall, the public is

negative about the individual mandate and the employer mandate, but is much in favor of the insurance changes that have been implemented. People are confused about the insurance exchange provisions of the act as well. An April 2013 tracking poll found that “about half the public says they do not have enough information about the health reform law to understand how it will impact their own family, a share that rises among the uninsured and low-income households” (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2013). The same poll reported that 42% of respondents did not know that the ACA was still the law of the land. Twelve percent believed it had been repealed by Congress, 7% believed it had been overturned by the Supreme Court, and 23% didn’t know whether it was still in effect or not.

Americans report being in good health more than any other OECD country. Their complaints are mostly about financial risks and to some extent access and waiting. A 2010 study of six developed countries showed that Americans were satisfied with their doctors and the availability of effective care, but were also more likely to report that the system needed to be completely rebuilt (Papanicolas, Cylus, & Smith, 2013).

4.1 Alignment with the Rest of Society

Previous section

Next section

4.1 ALIGNMENT WITH THE REST OF SOCIETY

The democratic process is likely to generate many policy experiments as we cope with advancing technology, changing demographics, political pressures, and economic fluctuations. These experiments will continue to stir debate about the merits of the many delivery and payment alternatives available in the United States and elsewhere.

For professionals in leadership positions, this is an unpleasant reality that makes it much harder to plan and implement any institutional strategy. Even the most prestigious institutions are affected by these external drivers. For example, the Finnish national orthopedic hospital, the Orton Hospital in Helsinki, had to downsize and reach out to private-pay individuals when the Finnish federal government chose to decentralize its jointly financed government health care program and pass administration on to local governments (Masalin, 1994). These local governments then attempted to control the rising cost of health care by reducing referrals to central specialized hospitals. Orton Hospital was a national resource of high-quality care, but as the referral patterns of the country changed, it, too, had to change the way it functioned in order to survive.

There is no universal, monolithic “we” when it comes health policy. There are interest groups, each of which has a central point of view. Within each group are many individuals with some diversity of views. They may be willing to compromise on some issues, but not on others. In the United States, much progressive legislation has been built by reaching agreement on means rather than on ends.

What Do Providers Want?

Providers are aware of their responsibility to act in the best interests of their patients. They are also inculcated with the “first do no harm” dictum. Even among the “disinterested” parties, some care most about individuals, whereas others focus on populations. This is often a vexing problem for those clinicians who, although committed to the needs of individual patients, are also trained in statistical thinking and population-based approaches.

Provider professionals want professional autonomy, income stability and growth comparable with their peers, successful outcomes for their patients, a sense of mastery of their field, and the respect of the public. They know that they will make some mistakes, but they will work very hard to avoid them. They do not want to put their careers on the line with every decision. They do not want to waste energy on bureaucratic exercises that consume resources and distract them from effective care. They also would like to see provisions to pay for care for the uninsured. They are aware that these individuals often forgo normal care and may end up later with more serious and costly problems. That is why some hospitals and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) have strongly endorsed state plans to cover the uninsured, even when they involve adding a tax on their charges to paying patients.

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has expressed some of these desires in its Bill of Rights for Registered Nurses (ANA, 2014). It addresses not only working conditions for nurses but also the right to provide “services that maintain respect for human dignity and embrace the uniqueness of each patient and the nature of his or her health problems, without restriction with regard to social or economic status.” The document says nurses must have the ability to meet their obligations to society and their patients, as well as meet their own needs. In addition, they have a right to workplaces that allow them to meet professional standards, act within their scope of practice, perform their duties in accordance with the ANA code of ethics, advocate for themselves as well as their patients, be safe, keep their patients safe, and negotiate their conditions of employment.

Professional Autonomy

The professional mystique of physicians in the past rested on their control of information. Those who favor a consumer-centric, free-market approach to health care decision making want to maximize the amount of information available to consumers. This has led many physicians to argue for privacy in the conduct of their practices, often in the name of protection of business secrets and personal privacy. Many physicians object, for example, to the fact that a drug company’s local sales representative has data on their prescribing behaviors (Saul, 2006). Insurers certainly profile physicians and institutions for costs and outcomes regularly, and aggregated data are increasingly available to employers, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), the Joint Commission, the federal government, and the general public. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released physician Medicaid income data in 2014.

Employer representatives want more information to be available to consumers. One thorny issue is information on individual physicians. President George W. Bush called for “transparency in the marketplace” and urged private insurers to disclose data on physician costs and outcomes; however, when the Business Roundtable called on the federal government to make its Medicare databases available, his administration cited a 1979 court ruling protecting the privacy of physicians and prohibiting disclosure of Medicare payments to individual physicians (Pear, 2006).

This is a difficult area. Professionals, like other businesspeople, have some rights to privacy and protections from the prying eyes of competitors, but some observers see the current tensions as the last gasp of a professional monopoly and an attempt to withhold information that bolsters purchaser sovereignty at all levels. Yet the public has difficulty interpreting this information effectively. Current techniques for evaluating case mix and adjusting for risk are crude at best. Measuring the outputs of medical interventions is difficult unless one knows that the inputs are comparable or unless there is a way to adjust the data to reflect differences in inputs, especially the condition of the patient going in.

Other professions fight to overcome the dominance of physicians. In many countries, pharmacists are freer to dispense independently. Nurse practitioners and midwives have fought state by state for the right to practice independently. Psychologists have been fighting some of the same battles with respect to prescribing for the mentally ill, and more and more types of counselors want to be able to bill Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance.

What Do Patients and Their Families Want?

Patients want to beat the odds. They and their families want the best possible outcomes, and they want to know that everything possible was done to ensure recovery (or a comfortable death) for their loved ones. Some want miracles. All want respect and caring. Most know that they need experts to look after their interests, but still want to be kept informed of what is going on so they can make sense of what is happening and avoid serious medical errors. Again, the issues are complex. Patients and families want to have access to quality information if they have the time and energy to make their own decisions. At the same time, they employ the provider as their agent, and the sicker they are, the more they tend rely on the clinician’s judgment.

When they are not terribly sick, they also worry about the cost of their care. They do not want to spend a lot of time in the waiting room or figuring out how to fill out paperwork. That is a nonmonetary cost, but a cost to them, nevertheless. It can also be a monetary cost if they lose work hours or reimbursement opportunities because of it.

They want to know that they were not treated unfairly by any part of the health care system and that their treatment was not affected by their gender, their ethnicity, or the color of their skin. They would like to think that it was not affected by the capacity of their pocketbooks, but probably believe that to be a bit unrealistic.

They also become apprehensive when they believe that profitability concerns or payment mechanisms are influencing which treatments they receive. An example has been the debate over whether the drugs chosen by oncologists for outpatient treatment have been chosen for their effectiveness or their profitability (Abelson, 2006a; Jacobson et al., 2006). Increasingly, patients are aware of the financial incentives affecting providers that in the long run can undermine provider legitimacy (Schlesinger, 2002).

Before passage and early implementation of the ACA, a strong concern of individuals was that they did not want to be denied insurance on the basis of prior medical conditions over which they had little or no control. The ACA specifically prohibits denial of coverage because of preexisting conditions. This provision became effective at the start of 2014.

Some individuals, particularly those sometimes referred to as the “young immortals,” have been willing to “go bare” (not carry health insurance) if they perceive a relatively low probability of a significantly costly health care event. This has raised the issue of free riders getting emergency care, even though they are not making provision for paying for it ahead of time. This is part of the impetus for the ACA mandate that all individuals obtain health insurance or pay an income tax penalty. An even thornier problem has been the moral hazard of those who knowingly indulge in high-risk behaviors for which the general public has had to pick up a share of the costs. The primary rationale for mandatory helmet laws, for example, was not to protect motorcyclists; it was to shelter the public from incurring the tremendous ongoing costs of caring for people with serious brain damage.

Individuals also worry about being bankrupted when they have insufficient insurance coverage for current and future situations. The ACA has dealt with this is a number of ways, including barring lifetime caps on claims. Yet consumers also worry about what the premium costs will do to their disposable income. Again, the ACA tries to deal with that by subsidizing the premiums of low-income workers.

What Do Insurers Want?

Insurers want to stay in business. That is why they fought so hard against any hint of a single-payer system and against the Obama administration proposal for a government health plan that would appear in the exchanges alongside the existing product lines (the public option).

Insurers want to be free to play the odds. They want to be able to make an acceptable level of net revenue whether they are a for-profit or a non-profit organization. They want to be able to compete in the marketplace on a “level playing field.” Their customers are the payers—the employers and the group and individual enrollees—and they want to maintain a good reputation with them. In the world of HMOs and preferred provider organizations (PPOs), insurers want the biggest possible discounts from providers to keep their medical loss ratios competitive.

Insurers also want to avoid adverse selection. They want protection against having those who know they have a higher-than-average probability of a claim from joining their system in disproportionate numbers. They also want to be able to attract those with a below-average probability of a claim. They do not want to be in a situation in which they are disadvantaged vis-à-vis other insurers. They would like to continue to compete on marketing skills, on underwriting ability, on investment returns on their reserves, and on their operating efficiencies.

Insurers, however, are very sensitive to market shifts. For example, many are currently developing new insurance products for individuals and small groups as the notion of consumer-oriented care and insurance exchanges increase consumer involvement in choosing products (and as employers reduce their contributions and coverage). They suddenly seem interested in individual subscribers that they ignored a few years ago. They are also interested in offering self-insurance plans to the small employers that they ignored previously.

What Do Employers Want?

Employers want to be able to recruit and retain competent, productive employees, and they want competitive cost structures. They are not in the health care purchasing business for any other reason. They are generally supportive of consumer-driven health care that allows individual consumers, rather than employers, insurers, or provider organizations, to make more decisions than in the past. This effectively shifts more of the costs onto the employees and from the lowest paid employees onto Medicaid. With the exchanges and the play-or-pay provisions of the ACA, they have many more options to consider, and it will be interesting to see what options they gravitate toward and for how long. Because the ACA’s employer contribution provisions apply to employers with 50 or more full-time employees, and full time has been defined as an average of 30 hours per week or at least 130 hours in a month, employers may choose to reduce the hours of workers to below 30 hours per week to keep their employee head count below that threshold.

Large Employers and Unions

In unionized firms, premium payments are set through collective bargaining between the company and the union. This bargaining can expand or contract the health care benefits, depending on the wants and needs of the employer and key groups within the union. After a period during which many of our bitterest strikes were waged over health benefit issues, both sides are now recognizing that employment-related health care costs can reduce domestic employment by encouraging companies to shift production to other countries. Employers are rapidly limiting their liabilities to specific dollar contributions toward health care for employees and retirees. Large firms and their unions are increasingly aligned in their desire to hold down costs and maintain coverage.

Small Employers

Because health care insurance bargaining power can be increased by pooling large numbers of beneficiaries, and because administrative costs and insurance prices are very sensitive to the number of individuals covered, small businesses find it hard to provide competitive health benefits to their workers. They need either subsidies or effective ways of pooling their people with others to make a viable enrollee population. Accomplishing this has been a major thrust of the ACA, which includes premium subsidies for small firms.

What Do Governments Want?

They want a satisfied public. They want health care expenditures to be predictable and at a level that does not disadvantage economic growth in both domestic and international competition. The system should work within the parameters of accepted cultural norms of equity and fairness so it does not foment unnecessary voter dissatisfaction. All levels of government want to keep costs down to avoid crowding out other programs or increasing taxpayer discontent. Federal, state, and local governments are also concerned about&nbs

Effects of Current Health Policies


Chapter 2

Where Are We?

American health care is in a state of flux as new scientific knowledge and clinical experience continue to change our definitions of illness and wellness. As a society, we respond by changing the ways health care is delivered. Health services increasingly impact our society—from health status to employment to budgetary economics to recreation to professional concerns to our perceptions of our own well-being.

American health care is also in flux because now that it has grown to more than one-sixth of our economy it threatens to squeeze out public goods such as education and infrastructure maintenance. People have wanted to do something about cost and access to care problems for a long time. The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) is doing much to address access issues, but opposition to certain provisions is strong. Employers are steadily shifting more risk to employees and their families, and there is a real tension between Washington and the state capitols over Medicaid expansion. Medicare trust funds are forecast to disappear over the next decade or so. Washington is unlikely to tolerate another major health reform battle, although major changes may come as a side effect of a “grand” government overhaul of spending and tax policies. The future is highly uncertain, and still we must plan and act as we go along.

This chapter reviews the current status of the U.S. health care system from several points of view:

•  Current outcomes and costs

•  Quality

•  Leadership

•  Complexity

•  Industrializing structures for delivery

•  Medicalization of our society

•  Redistribution of wealth

2.1 Current Outcomes and Costs

Previous section

Next section

2.1 CURRENT OUTCOMES AND COSTS

Health care expenditures were projected to rise to close to 20% of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) by 2015 (Borger et al., 2006), but more recent estimates from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) project it to be 18.2% for 2015 and 19.5% by 2021 (CMS, 2012). Average annual family health insurance premiums were estimated for 2012 at $15,745, with $11,429 paid by employers. The 4% growth rate for 2012 was slow by historical standards but still more than twice the growth rate of wage income. The comparable total insurance cost for a single individual was $5,615. Large employers (98%) offered health care benefits to workers but were cutting back on retiree health benefits. Only 50% of firms with 3 to 9 workers and 73% with 10 to 24 workers offered health benefits. Many small companies do not provide health benefits. At the same time, control of health care by health professionals is being threatened by outsiders calling for more reliance on government programs, more consumer-centered care, or both.

High Comparative Costs and Low Comparative Outcomes

The United States spends far more on health care per capita and as a percentage of GDP than other developed countries, yet does not seem to be much better off for it. 
Table 2-1
 illustrates this by comparing 11 countries on these two resource-input dimensions and on two outcome dimensions: overall life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rates. Similar rankings result when a number of other outcome variables are examined. The health care systems of these other countries offer virtually universal coverage, but the mechanisms they use range from mostly private insurance to a national health service. The incongruous combination of high U.S. costs and low U.S. outcomes does not seem to be associated with any one specific organizational or financing approach, yet that is about all on which experts seem to agree.

Table 2-1 Selected International Comparisons of Health Inputs and Outcomes, 2011

images

* 2010 data, ** 2009 data

Source: Data from: OECD Health Data 2013. Copyright OECD 2013. http://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems/oecdhealthdata2013-frequentlyrequesteddata.htm

Anderson et al. (2003, p. 103) noted that “U.S. policy makers need to reflect on what Americans are getting for their greater health care spending,” concluding that “It’s the prices, stupid.” Administrative costs for our system, estimated to account for as much as 30% of overall health care costs, are also high when compared with the rest of the world (Woolhandler, Campbell, & Himmelstein, 2003). Much of these overhead costs can be attributed to intermediaries who try to make up for or take advantage of imperfections in the marketplace. Examples include pharmacy benefits managers and third-party administrators.

Cannon and Tanner (2005) would explain away comparative international differences because

•  Data definitions and collection methods are not comparable.

•  Health care is partly a consumption good that normally rises with income.

•  The U.S. infant mortality rate is increased by our efforts to save low-birth-weight infants that would be stillborn elsewhere.

•  There is little proven relationship between longevity and health care expenditures.

•  Our cost figures include the costs of medical research and innovation that are not incurred elsewhere.

They argue that disease-specific data are a better measure. On the mortality-to-incidence ratios for AIDS, colon cancer, and breast cancer, for example, the U.S. system looks very good.

Overinsurance and Overutilization Arguments

If the United States spends more on health care than any other nation without top-notch results across the board, does that mean we are spending too much? Overspending can be about price (paying more than we need to for a service) or quantity (buying more services than we need or not getting what we paid for). In health care, it is probably a bit of both. The number of physician visits and hospital beds per capita was lower in the United States than the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development median (quantity), while health care worker wages, hospital supplies, and drugs were much costlier in the United States (price) (OECD, 2013). U.S. health care wages are the highest in the world.

Quantity factors are typically discussed under the rubric of overutilization. Some argue that overutilization is due to our fee-for-service (volume-based) payment system. Others argue that it is due to patient demand; patients are insulated from risk by our tax-subsidized health insurance system. Research also shows that an increased supply of health professionals leads to more utilization, yet attempts to restrict the supply of specialists using licensing systems have led to charges of illegal restraint of trade. Like health care, professional education is a confusing mixture of a public good and a personal investment. Many alternative methods—certificate of need regulations, for example—can be used to try to control overuse or underuse by influencing the supply or demand for health care services.

Cutler, Rosen, and Vijan (2006) concluded that if 50% of the increase in longevity between 1960 and 2000 is attributable to our increased medical care expenditures, we have gotten an acceptable return on our money. They suggest that the cost of a life-year gained was reasonable, especially for those younger than 65 years. They caution, however, that the returns from added expenditures, especially for older people, have diminished over time.

Continued High Cost-Inflation Rates

The CMS Office of the Actuary is responsible for providing estimates used to assess the financial viability of Medicare and Medicaid, which are two huge government programs. Its report, National Health Care Projections 2011–2021, concludes that health care spending is likely to outstrip economic growth (GDP growth) throughout the next decade. Although there will be ups and downs because of specific interventions, such as Medicare Part D drug coverage and the ACA, there will be little effect on aggregate health care spending, which will grow at a rate 2% higher than the overall economy. The government share of health spending will gradually increase, leaving health expenditures financed about equally between government and private sources. Fuchs (2013) suggests that the spread between the two growth rates has been narrowing for almost a decade, but is still a serious problem. 
Table 2-2
 summarizes historical and forecast data on health expenditures in dollars per capita and as a percentage of GDP. 
Figure 2-1
 illustrates that, except for the period from 1995 to 1998, the inflation rate for health care costs and health insurance premiums has been well above the inflation rate of the consumer price index and growth of workers’ earnings for most of the last 25 years. No wonder workers and employers feel squeezed by the rising costs of health care.

Disappearing Health Benefits

Employee health benefits (73% paid by employers, including government employers, in 2012) are threatening to disappear. Between 2000 and 2004, the percentage of insured people younger than age 65 in employment-based health programs dropped 5%, to 61%. Since then the coverage rate has stayed relatively constant. However, the proportion of employers offering employee health benefits has declined.

Table 2-2 U.S. National Health Expenditure (NHE) and Percentage of GDP, Selected Years 2006–2022

images

* Estimated projections include effects of the Affordable Care Act and an alternative to the sustainable growth rate.

Source: Reproduced from: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary. Accessed at http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/NationalHealthExpendData/downloads/proj2012.pdf

images

Figure 2-1 Cumulative changes in health insurance premiums, overall inflation, and workers’ earnings from 2000–2013.

Source: Reproduced from: “Employer Health Benefits 2013 Annual Survey—Chartpack,” (8465), The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research & Educational Trust

Official federal policy has been to encourage employees to participate in health savings accounts (HSAs). The theory is that workers will choose health insurance coverage with high deductibles and coinsurance and will put savings from the reduced premiums into tax-exempt (income and interest) savings accounts that can be used in case of high medical expenses, for future retirement income, or for other uses. These plans got off the ground slowly because employers were concerned about the problem of adverse selection, namely that younger, healthier employees would choose the HSA option, leaving higher risk employees to draw from a different and smaller risk pool. Early returns from postal employees showed that the employees signing up for HSAs were much younger than those who chose or kept traditional coverage. By 2012, however, HSAs accounted for 19% of health plan enrollment.

Some employers are also concerned about the “portability” feature of HSAs. If the worker leaves, the premium dollar saved goes with the worker rather than staying to help cover the remaining employees’ health insurance claims. Many employers see health benefits as a cost that is necessary to attract good employees and reduce employee turnover. Portability can run counter to that objective (Freudenheim, 2006).

2.2 Quality: A Systematic Evaluation

Previous section

Next section

2.2 QUALITY: A SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION

In 1980, Donabedian suggested the use of the following framework when evaluating quality of care:

•  Access

•  Technical management

•  Management of interpersonal relationships

•  Continuity of care

One could easily add additional categories, but these are a useful starting point (McLaughlin, 1998). All of these factors involve trade-offs with the cost of care, with one another, and with issues of equity and system complexity.

In this section we employ this categorization system with a modification. Donabedian developed this structure before most of our current concerns about costs and at a time when the health community shared a more homogeneous value system; therefore, we must consider the additional factors relating to costs and values, especially notions of equity in health care delivery. We have added costs to the list of categories. We will discuss value in a future chapter.

Within these now five categories, we will discuss three subcategories: structure, process, and outcome. Structure refers to available resource inputs, whereas process refers to conformance to best practices. We have already demonstrated what is meant by outcomes.

Access and Availability

If you were in a serious auto accident, you would want the ambulance to arrive as quickly as possible to stabilize you and transport you to a trauma center. You would want that ambulance to be available. If we are in danger, we supposedly are guaranteed access. If the situation is life threatening and the hospital participates in Medicare or Medicaid, it must take the patient regardless of ability to pay. For less serious situations, for emergent medical conditions, and for prevention, there are no such guarantees. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of our population lacks access, availability, or both. Estimates of the number of U.S. residents lacking health insurance coverage in 2011 began at 48 million and went up from there. Federal safety net spending, including Medicare, had decreased the lower-end number by more than a million from the preceding year. Implementation of the ACA should ameliorate many financial barriers to health care. The groundbreaking Massachusetts program reduced the proportion of nonelderly uninsured to single digits.

Numerous other perceived access problems exist. Although coverage for children has improved and the older population receives considerable benefits from Medicare and Medicaid, the working population has become worse off. Even before employer coverage decreased, the biggest access problems were among the working poor—those who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but have little or no access to employer-subsidized health insurance or are unable to pay their share of the costs even when employment-based insurance is available. Even under subsidized programs, such as those offered in Maine and Massachusetts, enrollment by the working poor has been slow (Belluck, 2007).

Many improvements in coverage for children followed the creation of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) in 1997 and have occurred despite reduced private insurance coverage for children. Racial disparities in insurance coverage remain, with the highest rate of uninsurance occurring among Hispanic children (16% in 2011) and African American children (11%). Children uninsured for all or part of the year were more than twice as likely to receive no medical care that year (SHADAC, 2006).

Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities

In the United States, black infants are twice as likely to die as non-Hispanic white infants. A child between 1 and 14 years old in Alaska or Arkansas was about twice as likely to die in 2009 as a child in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, or Connecticut. Even worse, children in Arkansas, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Mississippi were more than three times as likely to die compared to their counterparts in those New England states. In 2010, the heart disease age-adjusted death rate in Mississippi was twice what it was in Minnesota and some 30% above the national average (State Health Facts, 2013).

One hopeful sign is the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that there was no statistically significant difference in the vaccination rate of children 19 to 35 months in 2005, whether black, white, Hispanic, or Asian (CDC, 2006). There has been a continual narrowing of the gap with programs such as SCHIP and state attempts to recruit children into state programs, but the disparities are still striking.

Providers may also choose to direct their efforts toward consumers who have the greatest ability to pay. They gravitate toward more profitable specialties and may emphasize services that are most likely to generate income. In the United States, some gravitate to areas where malpractice insurance premiums are low. All of these factors can contribute to geographic and income disparities in care availability and access.

Many government and private programs bring services to special populations such as underserved rural areas, the posthospitalized mentally ill, American Indian and Alaskan Native communities, and people with AIDS. In these cases, the nation has modified its focus on a market-driven system to overcome market failures. Phelps (1997) pointed out that government involvement is one of the four features of the economics of health care delivery that differ from the delivery of most professional services. Three other economic differences that Phelps noted are uncertainty, information asymmetry, and externalities.

Structure

The United States stacks up pretty well in the developed world in terms of the total supply of services available, but services are distributed very unevenly. This is, however, a problem almost everywhere in the world. Urban centers attract trained personnel with job opportunities and educational and cultural opportunities for their families. Rural areas everywhere tend to lack personnel and facilities. That is one reason why in 2004 a third of U.S. patients could see a primary care physician the same day, but a sixth had to wait six or more days, and 16% reported going to the emergency room for a condition that could have been treated elsewhere if a regular doctor or source of care had been available (Schoen et al., 2004). Over time, this rural problem has lessened as the supply has increased&n

Effects of Current Health Policies


Chapter 2

Where Are We?

American health care is in a state of flux as new scientific knowledge and clinical experience continue to change our definitions of illness and wellness. As a society, we respond by changing the ways health care is delivered. Health services increasingly impact our society—from health status to employment to budgetary economics to recreation to professional concerns to our perceptions of our own well-being.

American health care is also in flux because now that it has grown to more than one-sixth of our economy it threatens to squeeze out public goods such as education and infrastructure maintenance. People have wanted to do something about cost and access to care problems for a long time. The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) is doing much to address access issues, but opposition to certain provisions is strong. Employers are steadily shifting more risk to employees and their families, and there is a real tension between Washington and the state capitols over Medicaid expansion. Medicare trust funds are forecast to disappear over the next decade or so. Washington is unlikely to tolerate another major health reform battle, although major changes may come as a side effect of a “grand” government overhaul of spending and tax policies. The future is highly uncertain, and still we must plan and act as we go along.

This chapter reviews the current status of the U.S. health care system from several points of view:

•  Current outcomes and costs

•  Quality

•  Leadership

•  Complexity

•  Industrializing structures for delivery

•  Medicalization of our society

•  Redistribution of wealth

2.1 Current Outcomes and Costs

Previous section

Next section

2.1 CURRENT OUTCOMES AND COSTS

Health care expenditures were projected to rise to close to 20% of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) by 2015 (Borger et al., 2006), but more recent estimates from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) project it to be 18.2% for 2015 and 19.5% by 2021 (CMS, 2012). Average annual family health insurance premiums were estimated for 2012 at $15,745, with $11,429 paid by employers. The 4% growth rate for 2012 was slow by historical standards but still more than twice the growth rate of wage income. The comparable total insurance cost for a single individual was $5,615. Large employers (98%) offered health care benefits to workers but were cutting back on retiree health benefits. Only 50% of firms with 3 to 9 workers and 73% with 10 to 24 workers offered health benefits. Many small companies do not provide health benefits. At the same time, control of health care by health professionals is being threatened by outsiders calling for more reliance on government programs, more consumer-centered care, or both.

High Comparative Costs and Low Comparative Outcomes

The United States spends far more on health care per capita and as a percentage of GDP than other developed countries, yet does not seem to be much better off for it. 
Table 2-1
 illustrates this by comparing 11 countries on these two resource-input dimensions and on two outcome dimensions: overall life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rates. Similar rankings result when a number of other outcome variables are examined. The health care systems of these other countries offer virtually universal coverage, but the mechanisms they use range from mostly private insurance to a national health service. The incongruous combination of high U.S. costs and low U.S. outcomes does not seem to be associated with any one specific organizational or financing approach, yet that is about all on which experts seem to agree.

Table 2-1 Selected International Comparisons of Health Inputs and Outcomes, 2011

images

* 2010 data, ** 2009 data

Source: Data from: OECD Health Data 2013. Copyright OECD 2013. http://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems/oecdhealthdata2013-frequentlyrequesteddata.htm

Anderson et al. (2003, p. 103) noted that “U.S. policy makers need to reflect on what Americans are getting for their greater health care spending,” concluding that “It’s the prices, stupid.” Administrative costs for our system, estimated to account for as much as 30% of overall health care costs, are also high when compared with the rest of the world (Woolhandler, Campbell, & Himmelstein, 2003). Much of these overhead costs can be attributed to intermediaries who try to make up for or take advantage of imperfections in the marketplace. Examples include pharmacy benefits managers and third-party administrators.

Cannon and Tanner (2005) would explain away comparative international differences because

•  Data definitions and collection methods are not comparable.

•  Health care is partly a consumption good that normally rises with income.

•  The U.S. infant mortality rate is increased by our efforts to save low-birth-weight infants that would be stillborn elsewhere.

•  There is little proven relationship between longevity and health care expenditures.

•  Our cost figures include the costs of medical research and innovation that are not incurred elsewhere.

They argue that disease-specific data are a better measure. On the mortality-to-incidence ratios for AIDS, colon cancer, and breast cancer, for example, the U.S. system looks very good.

Overinsurance and Overutilization Arguments

If the United States spends more on health care than any other nation without top-notch results across the board, does that mean we are spending too much? Overspending can be about price (paying more than we need to for a service) or quantity (buying more services than we need or not getting what we paid for). In health care, it is probably a bit of both. The number of physician visits and hospital beds per capita was lower in the United States than the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development median (quantity), while health care worker wages, hospital supplies, and drugs were much costlier in the United States (price) (OECD, 2013). U.S. health care wages are the highest in the world.

Quantity factors are typically discussed under the rubric of overutilization. Some argue that overutilization is due to our fee-for-service (volume-based) payment system. Others argue that it is due to patient demand; patients are insulated from risk by our tax-subsidized health insurance system. Research also shows that an increased supply of health professionals leads to more utilization, yet attempts to restrict the supply of specialists using licensing systems have led to charges of illegal restraint of trade. Like health care, professional education is a confusing mixture of a public good and a personal investment. Many alternative methods—certificate of need regulations, for example—can be used to try to control overuse or underuse by influencing the supply or demand for health care services.

Cutler, Rosen, and Vijan (2006) concluded that if 50% of the increase in longevity between 1960 and 2000 is attributable to our increased medical care expenditures, we have gotten an acceptable return on our money. They suggest that the cost of a life-year gained was reasonable, especially for those younger than 65 years. They caution, however, that the returns from added expenditures, especially for older people, have diminished over time.

Continued High Cost-Inflation Rates

The CMS Office of the Actuary is responsible for providing estimates used to assess the financial viability of Medicare and Medicaid, which are two huge government programs. Its report, National Health Care Projections 2011–2021, concludes that health care spending is likely to outstrip economic growth (GDP growth) throughout the next decade. Although there will be ups and downs because of specific interventions, such as Medicare Part D drug coverage and the ACA, there will be little effect on aggregate health care spending, which will grow at a rate 2% higher than the overall economy. The government share of health spending will gradually increase, leaving health expenditures financed about equally between government and private sources. Fuchs (2013) suggests that the spread between the two growth rates has been narrowing for almost a decade, but is still a serious problem. 
Table 2-2
 summarizes historical and forecast data on health expenditures in dollars per capita and as a percentage of GDP. 
Figure 2-1
 illustrates that, except for the period from 1995 to 1998, the inflation rate for health care costs and health insurance premiums has been well above the inflation rate of the consumer price index and growth of workers’ earnings for most of the last 25 years. No wonder workers and employers feel squeezed by the rising costs of health care.

Disappearing Health Benefits

Employee health benefits (73% paid by employers, including government employers, in 2012) are threatening to disappear. Between 2000 and 2004, the percentage of insured people younger than age 65 in employment-based health programs dropped 5%, to 61%. Since then the coverage rate has stayed relatively constant. However, the proportion of employers offering employee health benefits has declined.

Table 2-2 U.S. National Health Expenditure (NHE) and Percentage of GDP, Selected Years 2006–2022

images

* Estimated projections include effects of the Affordable Care Act and an alternative to the sustainable growth rate.

Source: Reproduced from: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary. Accessed at http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/NationalHealthExpendData/downloads/proj2012.pdf

images

Figure 2-1 Cumulative changes in health insurance premiums, overall inflation, and workers’ earnings from 2000–2013.

Source: Reproduced from: “Employer Health Benefits 2013 Annual Survey—Chartpack,” (8465), The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research & Educational Trust

Official federal policy has been to encourage employees to participate in health savings accounts (HSAs). The theory is that workers will choose health insurance coverage with high deductibles and coinsurance and will put savings from the reduced premiums into tax-exempt (income and interest) savings accounts that can be used in case of high medical expenses, for future retirement income, or for other uses. These plans got off the ground slowly because employers were concerned about the problem of adverse selection, namely that younger, healthier employees would choose the HSA option, leaving higher risk employees to draw from a different and smaller risk pool. Early returns from postal employees showed that the employees signing up for HSAs were much younger than those who chose or kept traditional coverage. By 2012, however, HSAs accounted for 19% of health plan enrollment.

Some employers are also concerned about the “portability” feature of HSAs. If the worker leaves, the premium dollar saved goes with the worker rather than staying to help cover the remaining employees’ health insurance claims. Many employers see health benefits as a cost that is necessary to attract good employees and reduce employee turnover. Portability can run counter to that objective (Freudenheim, 2006).

2.2 Quality: A Systematic Evaluation

Previous section

Next section

2.2 QUALITY: A SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION

In 1980, Donabedian suggested the use of the following framework when evaluating quality of care:

•  Access

•  Technical management

•  Management of interpersonal relationships

•  Continuity of care

One could easily add additional categories, but these are a useful starting point (McLaughlin, 1998). All of these factors involve trade-offs with the cost of care, with one another, and with issues of equity and system complexity.

In this section we employ this categorization system with a modification. Donabedian developed this structure before most of our current concerns about costs and at a time when the health community shared a more homogeneous value system; therefore, we must consider the additional factors relating to costs and values, especially notions of equity in health care delivery. We have added costs to the list of categories. We will discuss value in a future chapter.

Within these now five categories, we will discuss three subcategories: structure, process, and outcome. Structure refers to available resource inputs, whereas process refers to conformance to best practices. We have already demonstrated what is meant by outcomes.

Access and Availability

If you were in a serious auto accident, you would want the ambulance to arrive as quickly as possible to stabilize you and transport you to a trauma center. You would want that ambulance to be available. If we are in danger, we supposedly are guaranteed access. If the situation is life threatening and the hospital participates in Medicare or Medicaid, it must take the patient regardless of ability to pay. For less serious situations, for emergent medical conditions, and for prevention, there are no such guarantees. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of our population lacks access, availability, or both. Estimates of the number of U.S. residents lacking health insurance coverage in 2011 began at 48 million and went up from there. Federal safety net spending, including Medicare, had decreased the lower-end number by more than a million from the preceding year. Implementation of the ACA should ameliorate many financial barriers to health care. The groundbreaking Massachusetts program reduced the proportion of nonelderly uninsured to single digits.

Numerous other perceived access problems exist. Although coverage for children has improved and the older population receives considerable benefits from Medicare and Medicaid, the working population has become worse off. Even before employer coverage decreased, the biggest access problems were among the working poor—those who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but have little or no access to employer-subsidized health insurance or are unable to pay their share of the costs even when employment-based insurance is available. Even under subsidized programs, such as those offered in Maine and Massachusetts, enrollment by the working poor has been slow (Belluck, 2007).

Many improvements in coverage for children followed the creation of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) in 1997 and have occurred despite reduced private insurance coverage for children. Racial disparities in insurance coverage remain, with the highest rate of uninsurance occurring among Hispanic children (16% in 2011) and African American children (11%). Children uninsured for all or part of the year were more than twice as likely to receive no medical care that year (SHADAC, 2006).

Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities

In the United States, black infants are twice as likely to die as non-Hispanic white infants. A child between 1 and 14 years old in Alaska or Arkansas was about twice as likely to die in 2009 as a child in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, or Connecticut. Even worse, children in Arkansas, Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Mississippi were more than three times as likely to die compared to their counterparts in those New England states. In 2010, the heart disease age-adjusted death rate in Mississippi was twice what it was in Minnesota and some 30% above the national average (State Health Facts, 2013).

One hopeful sign is the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that there was no statistically significant difference in the vaccination rate of children 19 to 35 months in 2005, whether black, white, Hispanic, or Asian (CDC, 2006). There has been a continual narrowing of the gap with programs such as SCHIP and state attempts to recruit children into state programs, but the disparities are still striking.

Providers may also choose to direct their efforts toward consumers who have the greatest ability to pay. They gravitate toward more profitable specialties and may emphasize services that are most likely to generate income. In the United States, some gravitate to areas where malpractice insurance premiums are low. All of these factors can contribute to geographic and income disparities in care availability and access.

Many government and private programs bring services to special populations such as underserved rural areas, the posthospitalized mentally ill, American Indian and Alaskan Native communities, and people with AIDS. In these cases, the nation has modified its focus on a market-driven system to overcome market failures. Phelps (1997) pointed out that government involvement is one of the four features of the economics of health care delivery that differ from the delivery of most professional services. Three other economic differences that Phelps noted are uncertainty, information asymmetry, and externalities.

Structure

The United States stacks up pretty well in the developed world in terms of the total supply of services available, but services are distributed very unevenly. This is, however, a problem almost everywhere in the world. Urban centers attract trained personnel with job opportunities and educational and cultural opportunities for their families. Rural areas everywhere tend to lack personnel and facilities. That is one reason why in 2004 a third of U.S. patients could see a primary care physician the same day, but a sixth had to wait six or more days, and 16% reported going to the emergency room for a condition that could have been treated elsewhere if a regular doctor or source of care had been available (Schoen et al., 2004). Over time, this rural problem has lessened as the supply has increased&n