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Classroom Observation – Razo


CLASSROOM OBSERVATION:

Eliana Razo uses an unusual seating arrangement in her English III classroom.  This provides opportunities for students to work with partners in providing textual evidence in support of opinions.  Her use of a gallery walk and exit slips further reinforces engagement and critical thinking.


TASK- View video and complete observation reflection

Effective teachers always reflect on the lesson, and lesson outcomes.  Listen as the teacher reflects on this lesson, and compare it to the responses you have written on the observation worksheet. Use both the teacher’s reflections and your own observation when writing your overall observational reflection.

*****RECORD YOUR ANSWERS ON THE ATTACHED DOCUMENT – OBSERVATIONAL REFLECTION

>>>>> VIEW VIDEO HERE

Classroom Observation – Razo

  Effective teachers always reflect on the lesson, and lesson outcomes.  Listen as the teacher reflects on this lesson, and compare it to the responses you have written on the observation worksheet. Use both the teacher’s reflections and your own observation when writing your overall observational reflection.    

Classroom Observation – Razo

  Effective teachers always reflect on the lesson, and lesson outcomes.  Listen as the teacher reflects on this lesson, and compare it to the responses you have written on the observation worksheet. Use both the teacher’s reflections and your own observation when writing your overall observational reflection.    

Classroom Observation – Razo

Name: Date:

Eliana Razo

English III IB – Plot Structure

1. One of the first things you may notice about this English III classroom is the seating arrangement. What do you think Ms. Razo’s purpose was in arranging the tables in this way?

2. Ms. Razo is asking students to draw on previous learning and make a comparison. She is also asking probing follow-up questions based on their responses. In doing this, she is guiding students to think critically and develop a deeper understanding of the book. Why is this important for students to be able to do?

3. Did you see how Ms. Razo addresses the fact that some students didn’t have the necessary class materials, but doesn’t let that derail her lesson for any length of time? She knows she can discuss this at a later time and is focused on maximizing instructional time. What are some positive ways you think you could ensure students bring the appropriate materials to class?

4. What has Ms. Razo accomplished with the exercise the class has just completed? Reflect.

5. When Ms. Razo asks students to work with a partner to identify the setting and plot structure for Chapter 2, in which portion of the lesson cycle are they participating?

6. Notice how Ms. Razo has provided students with tips on how to navigate content she recognizes as difficult or challenging. What tips have you observed?

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7. Discuss the benefits of using a t-chart in this exercise. How is this helpful to the students and what kinds of information does it provide the teacher?

8. As you watch this portion of the lesson unfold, check your answers from the question before. What do you observe the students and Ms. Razo do?

9. Look at the board behind Ms. Razo in this scene. Posting a daily or weekly agenda and homework in a prominent location in your classroom, helps students learn organization skills that will be useful throughout their lives.

10. How did Ms. Razo’s response to the student’s question encourage critical thinking?

11. Watch how Ms. Razo organically guides this group of students to use the text as evidence to support their difference of opinion on whether the main character likes her uncle or not. This is another critical thinking skill that Ms. Razo is integrating into her lesson. At which level of Bloom’s would you say these students are working?

12. Ms. Razo redirected these two boys for working independently because she knows that when students collaborate, they tend to work at higher cognitive levels and ultimately the learning is more meaningful. Reflect.

13. How did Ms. Razo hold each member of this group accountable for learning?

14. You should have picked up on how Zainab seemed to dominate most of the conversation. Ms. Razo asked pointed questions of Will and Carmina to ensure that they were contributing and learning. Sometimes it is necessary to do this or have another method in place to ensure all members of a group have the same learning opportunities and pull their weight.

15. Gallery Walks are useful learning tools in the classroom. Depending on the nature of the activity, it may be necessary to leave one member of the group behind to explain the group’s ideas, etc. to the observers. In other cases, students can roam freely discussing and taking notes as they see fit. Exit tickets are an excellent way of checking for understanding and holding students accountable for learning in a more informal way. Responses to exit tickets can inform instruction for the following day, such as whether an adjustment or reteaching is necessary.

16. Effective teachers always reflect on the lesson, and lesson outcomes. Listen as the teacher reflects on this lesson, and compare it to the responses you have written on the observation worksheet. Use both the teacher’s reflections and your own observation when writing your overall observational reflection.

Also, pay particular attention to Ms. Razo’s explanation of how she monitors students while they work in groups. She provides an excellent rationale on why she has them work collaboratively and how this influences her role in the classroom.

17. Ms. Razo brings up an excellent point about students that require little academic guidance during a lesson. Be prepared to encounter this within your classroom and how to juggle providing intense support to struggling students with providing validation and encouragement to students that are excelling.

Ms. Razo will now discuss her planning process and the needed skill of being able to adjust and roll with changes to a lesson plan based on student needs. One of the many amazing things about the teaching profession is that monotony doesn’t exist! Each year, each day, each class period is NEVER the same.