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Accounting homework help

ACCRUAL VS CASH ACCOUNTING

Please watch the following videos and discuss this topic:

Discuss the timing difference on revenue and expense recognition between cash-based and accrual-based accounting by citing a specific transaction as an example. How does this issue impact financial reporting (FASB) and tax reporting (IRS)?

 

Income measurement

Point of sales

Sales returns

Accounting homework help


Zeeshan Muhammad Tariq

Computerized Accounting ACCT-411

Table of Contents
SET UP FOR A NEW COMPANY 3
HOW TO OPEN AN EXISTING COMPANY 17
ENTERING CHART OF ACCOUNTS IN THE SOFTWARE 24
ENTERING THE BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE ACCOUNTS IN CHART OF ACCOUNTS 27
HOW TO CREATE CUSTOMER RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 30
HOW TO CREATE VENDOR RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 32
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE CUSTOMERS (IF ANY) 35
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE VENDORS (IF ANY) 36
HOW TO EDIT CUSTOMER WINDOW ITEMS 37
PAYMENT TERMS: 38
ACCOUNT AGING: 41
CUSTOM FIELDS: 42
FINANCE CHARGES: 42
PAY METHODS: 43
MAINTAINING INVENTORY ACCOUNT IN THE SOFTWARE 43
AN ILLUSTRATION OF MAINTAING INVENTORY ACCOUNT IN THE SOFTWARE: 46
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF INVENTORY 49
HOW TO MAKE A PURCHASE ORDER 52
HOW TO RECORD RECEIVING OF INVENTORY 55
RECEIVING INVENTORY WITHOUT ISSUING PURCHASE ORDER: 58
RECEIVING SOME INVENTORY AFTER ISSUING & WITHOUT ISSUING PURCHASE ORDER: 60
HOW TO MAKE A QUOTATION IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 63
HOW TO MAKE A SALE ORER IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 65
HOW TO MAKE A SALE INVOICE IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 70
HOW TO RECEIVE THE CASH IN THE SOFTWARE 70
HOW TO RECORD SALES RETURN IN THE SOFTWARE 72
HOW TO RECORD SALES RETURN IN THE SOFTWARE 76
HOW TO RECORD A JOURNAL ENTRY IN PEACHTREE SOFTWARE 80
HOW TO USE GLOBAL OPTION IN PEACHTREE SOFTWARE 81
HOW TO SET SECURITY CODE FOR PEACHTREE USERS 84





SET UP FOR A NEW COMPANY

Following are the steps involved in order to create a new company using Peachtree accounting software 2004:


From this screen click on “Set up a new company”. Following is a wizard screen which will be appeared on the screen by clicking on “Set up a new company”.

This wizard scheme will provide us with five options which are required to be entered in the software in order to complete our steps involved in the creation of the company. First we press the “Next” button and the following “company information” wizard scheme appears on the screen.

After filling the above shown wizard, we click the “Next” button in order to continue our steps towards the creation of our company in Peachtree accounting software 2004.

Then this wizard scheme of “Chart of Accounts” will be appeared after filling all the required information in “Company information” wizard Scheme. From this wizard of “Chart of Accounts”, we will click on “Build your own company”. Following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” will be appeared on the screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

We have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to convert a company data from another software into Peachtree software then we select the second last option which is “Convert a company from another accounting program”, the following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for the conversion of a company from another software will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to copy settings of an already existed company in Peachtree software then we select the third last option which is “Copy settings from an existing Peachtree Accounting company”, the following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for Copy settings from an existing Peachtree Accounting company will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard of “chart of accounts” we first select the available company in “Available Peachtree companies” window and after this we press “View chart of accounts” and get the list of accounts for that company in the window above “View chart of accounts”. From here we select the accounts which we want to add in our new company and press the “Next” Button. After this the rest of the procedure remains the same for creation of our company.

From this new wizard scheme of “Copy Company information”, we can select different options which we require to be copied from the existing available companies in the Peachtree software. We select the options required to be copied and then press the “Next” Button in order to continue the formation of a new company. On pressing “Next” we arrive on to the following wizard scheme.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Congratulations” on implementing this procedure.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and within 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to set up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies in Peachtree software then we select the second option from the beginning which is “Set up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies”, and click on the “Next” button and the following wizard scheme of “Chart of Accounts” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for settings up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies from an existing Peachtree Accounting company will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard scheme of “Chart of accounts “we can select the industry or the company related to our company. If we want to form a new store then we will be selecting “Retail Company” from the “Available chart of accounts” option. If we wish to see the list of accounts available in the retail company chart of accounts then we can do this simply by clicking on “retail company” option and then clicking on “View chart of Accounts” option. By doing this the following screen of the list of chart of accounts for a retail company will be displayed on our screen.

From this window we can scroll down and have a look on the accounts listed in the chart of accounts of the retail company. From these accounts we can add the accounts in our new company. Now we will close this window and press the “Next” button in order to get to the next wizard scheme “Accounting Method”.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This “Defaults “wizard scheme displays the default settings made by the Peachtree accounting software for our new company which we can change after creation of the company. From this we press the “Next” button and get to the following screen of “Congratulation”.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and within 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have left only with the procedure of creating a company from the first option so we are going to create a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004 using this first option of “Set up a new Retail, Service, Construction, Manufacturing, or Distribution company, using a specified chart of accounts”. From this wizard scheme of “chart of accounts”, now we select the first option which is “Set up a new Retail, service, Construction, Manufacturing or Distribution company using a simplified chart of accounts”. By using this option we will be able to get the simplified sample chart of accounts already prepared in the Peachtree software for different companies. Press the “Next” button and arrive to the following wizard scheme on the desktop screen.

In this new wizard we have the “Available Chart of accounts” for a Retail company, Service Company, Construction Company, Manufacturing Company and Distribution Company. We can select any company as per our requirements and can click on “Next” button to complete our process of creation of a company. We can also view the chart of accounts of a specific available company by clicking on that required company and then clicking on “View chart of accounts” option. By doing this we will be arriving on the following wizard scheme.

From this list of chart of accounts we can scroll down and have a look on the available accounts in that list. Now we close this list and press the “next” button after selecting our required company. We get the following screen after following this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This “Defaults “wizard scheme displays the default settings made by the Peachtree accounting software for our new company which we can change after creation of the company. From this we press the “Next” button and get to the following screen of “Congratulation”.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.



HOW TO OPEN AN EXISTING COMPANY

We can open an existing company using our Peachtree software which we had already created in the past or had been created by someone else in the past. For this the existing company must be saved in the hard drive of the computer on which the Peachtree software is installed. For this first we open the Peachtree software and arrive on the following wizard scheme on our desktop.

From this wizard scheme we select the first option “Open an existing company”. On clicking “Open an existing company”, following wizard is shown on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme we Press the “Browse” button on the left side of the wizard and locate our existing company folder in the hard drive. On clicking “Browse” button we arrive on the following screen.

From here we select our drive in which we have saved the files of the existing company. After selecting that drive we further locate the folder in which we have saved our files of existing company from the “Directories” portion. Drive can be selected by the following method.

After selecting the drive in which we have saved the data folder of our already existed company we finally locate the company folder and select that folder from the screen as follows and click the “Ok” button.

One thing should be kept in mind that on selecting the Company the folder sign with that company should be of closed folder rather than opened folder. The difference between both the folders has been illustrated in the following diagram.

After clicking the “Ok” button the existing company data will be restored in the software and a new screen will be opened on the desktop screen as follows.

This window is the main screen for our company which we were willing to open. At the top of the Peachtree software we will find the name of the company with which we had already created it in the past.

OR

There is another method of opening an existing company using Peachtree software. In this method we directly copy the files of the existing company which was created in the past and paste them in the companies’ directory of Peachtree Accounting Software. For this first of all we select the data folder of the already existed company which we are willing to open using Peachtree. After selecting it we Right click on it and Click on “Copy” as shown in the following screen.

After clicking on “Copy” we open the drive in which the Peachtree software is installed. Mostly this is the Drive “C” where we save our software as well as windows but it may vary Pc to Pc. On opening the Drive “C” we see the following screen on our desktop.

From this window we double click on the folder “Program Files” and get to the following screen.

From this window we open the “Peachtree” folder by double clicking on it. By doing this we arrive on the following screen on our desktop.

From this window we open the “Company” folder by double clicking on it and arrive on the following screen on our desktop.

Here we paste the folder of the existing company which we already copied in the start of the process by using a shortcut key CTRL + V or we can Right click within the window and click on Paste if we have already copied it from the original directory as we did in the start.

After pasting it in this folder we again go back to the Peachtree Software or open it again. After opening it we get the following screen on our desktop.

From this wizard scheme we select the first option “Open an existing company”. On clicking “Open an existing company”, following wizard is shown on our desktop screen.

From this we select our company which we have copied in the company folder and click the “Ok” button. On clicking “Ok” the main screen for our company which we were willing to open appears on the desktop screen. At the top of the Peachtree software we will find the name of the company with which we had already created it in the past.



ENTERING CHART OF ACCOUNTS IN THE SOFTWARE

If we have chosen the “Build your own company” in the beginning from the “Chart of accounts” wizard scheme then we will have to make our own chart of accounts after the formation of the company is completed. For this first we open the company in which we want to enter the chart of the accounts. The first page of the company will be opened in the same manner as described above. Following front page of the company appears on the desktop screen on opening the window.

From this screen we first select the “Maintain” option from the above taskbar and by clicking on the “Maintain” option, following options further appears on the screen.

From these options we select the “Chart of accounts” option in order to enter the chart of accounts in the software. On clicking on “Chart of accounts”, following screen appears on the desktop screen.

This is the window where we enter the accounts related to our company or store whatever is our concern. It contains “Account ID” option in which we enter the Code of the account or the ID of the account. Another option is “Description” in which we add the name of the account. Like Petty cash, cash in hand, cash at bank, account receivable, account payable and so on. The third option is “Account type”. From this option we can select the type or the nature of the account which we are adding in the list of chart of accounts. For instance the type of account for petty cash and cash at bank will be “Cash”, the type of account for account receivable will be “Account receivable” and so on. There is another option of “Inactive”. By selecting this option our account will be inactivated and we will not be able to record any financial entry regarding that account. That account will be closed for recording the transactions and marinating the records. The next option is “Change ID”, from where we can change the ID of the account if we have entered it incorrectly. We can even delete the account using this window. All these are explained in the further pages. We enter the Code of the account in the “Account ID” as follows.

Below this “Account ID” option there is another option “Description”. We enter the name of the account in this portion as illustrated follows.

After this we select the “Account type” by clicking on it. On clicking it, different options for the account type appears on the desktop screen from which we select the appropriate account type for our account. Following options appear on the screen on clicking “Account type”.

If we have made any mistake in our chart of accounts with any of our account then we can also rectify our mistake. If we had written wrong description or ID for the account or selected the wrong account type for the account then these mistakes can be rectified by using the following procedure.

If we want to change the ID of our account then we need to first select that account from the list and after selecting it we press the button of “Change ID” in the top of the “Maintain chart of accounts” wizard scheme. On doing this, following screen appears on the desktop screen.

Here we enter our new correct ID for the account in “Enter New Account ID” and click on “ok”. After this the ID of the account will be changed to our new entered ID. If we want to change the description or the account type of any account then we can also do it. First we will have to select that particular account which requires to be amended and the click on description and change the description or account type click on account type and change the account type to our required account type. After changing the description or account type press the save button which have been shown below.

We can also inactive any account. On inactivating the account that account will be inactivated and we will be not is allowed to use that account later in the future transactions. To inactivate any account we must select that account from the list and then click on the inactive box as shown below.



ENTERING THE BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE ACCOUNTS IN CHART OF ACCOUNTS

Now we have to enter the opening balances in the accounts. We click on “Beginning Balances” button in order to enter our beginning balances. The button of “Beginning balances” has been shown below in the wizard scheme.

From this we press the “Beginning balances” button and on clicking it, following window appears on the desktop screen.

If we have to enter the balance for the month of February then we will have to enter the data in January month. Same if the balance of March is required to be entered as beginning balance then we will enter the beginning balance in the month of February. The amounts or balance entered will be the closing balance of February which will become the opening balance of March. One more thing which is very important is that the first digit in the date is of MONTH not DAY as it’s American software where MONTH is written before DAY in date.

On selecting the period we click on the “Ok” button and the following screen appears on the desktop screen.

Here we enter the balances in the account. The left side is for the Assets and Expenses while the right side is for Liabilities, equity and Income. We enter the opening balances of our respective accounts. The amounts or the balances will only be entered in the white portion which is for the NORMAL BALANCE for that respective account. It means if we have selected Assets as the type of account for Cash the Assets portion which is the left side will become white and eligible for balance entry. We must enter the data in such a manner that the left side and right side of the trial balance is equal to each other because e the arithmetical accuracy of the data is proved by the equal balance of trial balance.



HOW TO CREATE CUSTOMER RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE

After opening the company in our Peachtree accounting software, the first thing we do in order to create the customer record is that we Click on “maintain” option at the top of the software’s toolbar and on clicking it, following window appears on our desktop screen.

From this window we select the first option which is “Customers/Prospectus….” In order to create our customer records. On clicking it following window scheme appears on the screen.

We fill this window for each of our client or customer. Every customer will be allocated with a separate and unique ID which will be written in “Customer ID” portion. This ID cannot be repeated for any other customer. Every customer will have a unique and different ID as we allocated different ID for different accounts while preparing chart of Accounts in the beginning. After this we write the name of the organization with which we are dealing in the “Name” portion in this window. After writing the name of the organization we first fill the “General” part of the requirements. We enter the name of that person or the post of that person as per the conditions with whom we are going to engage in. This can be sales representative, salesman, Sales manager or any other person as per the requirements. After this we enter the address of that customer in the “Address” portion. Only 30 alphabets or numbers can be written in a single line in “Address” option. If the address is longer than 30 alphabets then we can write the remaining address in the 2nd line for address. Then we write the city and so on. In “Customer Type” we mention which type of customer is he/she is according to our categorizations. This Customer account is a subsidiary ledger account which will be entered in sales revenue account. After filling the other required information in “General’ we move onwards on to Sales Defaults by clicking on it. Customer ID, Name and GL Sales acct must be entered in order to create the record for any customer.

Here we enter all the required information. In the “GL Sales Acct” portion we write the ID of our sales revenue account. If we do write any ID which doesn’t exist in the chat of accounts then the blank area in “GL Sales Acct” start blinking. After filling this information we move on to the “Payment Defaults” by clicking on it.

Here we enter all the required information regarding the payment to the client. After filling this portion we move forward to Custom Fields by clicking on it.

Here we enter the Second contact if required, Reference if required and so. These Field labels can be changed easily on the customer default window. After completing this “Custom Fields” we move forward to “History” by clicking on it.

This is the last window before completion of a single customer record. After filling these all required information, we click on “Save” button in order to save the record which we have entered in the software for that specific customer. After this we can again repeat our whole process in order to create more records for different customers. Following is the Save Button.

Z:\COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING\save.bmp



HOW TO CREATE VENDOR RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE

After opening the company in our Peachtree accounting software, the first thing we do in order to create the vendor record is that we Click on “maintain” opt

Accounting homework help

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Not for profit entities (Topic 958)
Publication date: 18 Sep 2020   

Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-07
September 2020

Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958)

Presentation and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

An Amendment of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification®

The FASB Accounting Standards Codification® is the source of authoritative generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)
recognized by the FASB to be applied by nongovernmental entities. An Accounting Standards Update is not authoritative;
rather, it is a document that communicates how the Accounting Standards Codification is being amended. It also provides
other information to help a user of GAAP understand how and why GAAP is changing and when the changes will be effective.

For additional copies of this Accounting Standards Update and information on applicable prices and discount rates contact:

Order Department
Financial Accounting Standards Board
401 Merritt 7
PO Box 5116
Norwalk, CT 06856-5116

Please ask for our Product Code No. ASU2020-07.

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING SERIES (ISSN 0885-9051) is published monthly with the exception of May, July, and October by the
Financial Accounting Foundation, 401 Merritt 7, PO Box 5116, Norwalk, CT 06856-5116. Periodicals postage paid at Norwalk,
CT and at additional mailing offices. The full subscription rate is $312 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Financial Accounting Series, 401 Merritt 7, PO Box 5116, Norwalk, CT 06856-5116. | No. 498

Copyright © 2020 by Financial Accounting Foundation. All rights reserved. Content
copyrighted by Financial Accounting Foundation may not be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the
Financial Accounting Foundation. Financial Accounting Foundation claims no copyright
in any portion hereof that constitutes a work of the United States Government.

Summary
Why Is the FASB Issuing This Accounting Standards Update (Update)?

The Board is issuing this Update to improve generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by increasing the transparency of
contributed nonfinancial assets for not-for-profit (NFP) entities through enhancements to presentation and disclosure. The
amendments in this Update address certain stakeholders’ concerns about the lack of transparency about the measurement of
contributed nonfinancial assets recognized by NFPs, as well as the amount of those contributions used in an NFP’s programs
and other activities.

Who Is Affected by the Amendments in This Update?

The amendments in this Update apply to NFPs that receive contributed nonfinancial assets. Contribution revenue may be
presented in the financial statements using different terms (for example, gifts, donations, grants, gifts-in-kind, donated services,
or other terms). The amendments address presentation and disclosure of contributed nonfinancial assets. Contribution and
nonfinancial asset are both defined terms in the Master Glossary of the Codification and are understood in practice. The term
nonfinancial asset includes fixed assets (such as land, buildings, and equipment), use of fixed assets or utilities, materials and
supplies, intangible assets, services, and unconditional promises of those assets.

What Are the Main Provisions?

Viewpoint

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The amendments in this Update require that an NFP:

1. Present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities, apart from contributions of cash and
other financial assets.

2. Disclose:

a. A disaggregation of the amount of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities by
category that depicts the type of contributed nonfinancial assets.

b. For each category of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized (as identified in (a)):

i. Qualitative information about whether the contributed nonfinancial assets were either monetized or utilized
during the reporting period. If utilized, an NFP will disclose a description of the programs or other activities
in which those assets were used.

ii. The NFP’s policy (if any) about monetizing rather than utilizing contributed nonfinancial assets. iii. A
description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.

iii. A description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.
iv. A description of the valuation techniques and inputs used to arrive at a fair value measure, in accordance

with the requirements in Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement, at initial recognition.
v. The principal market (or most advantageous market) used to arrive at a fair value measure if it is a market in

which the recipient NFP is prohibited by a donor-imposed restriction from selling or using the contributed
nonfinancial assets.

How Do the Main Provisions Differ from Current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and Why Are They
an Improvement?

Subtopic 958-605, Not-for-Profit Entities—Revenue Recognition, specifies requirements for the recognition and initial
measurement of contributions and disclosure requirements for contributed services. Subtopic 958-605 does not include
specific presentation requirements for contributed nonfinancial assets or specific disclosure requirements for contributed
nonfinancial assets other than contributed services. The amendments in this Update improve financial reporting by providing
new presentation and disclosure requirements about contributed nonfinancial assets for NFPs, including additional disclosure
requirements for recognized contributed services. The amendments will not change the recognition and measurement
requirements in Subtopic 958-605 for those assets.

When Will the Amendments Be Effective and What Are the Transition Requirements?

The amendments in this Update should be applied on a retrospective basis and are effective for annual periods beginning after
June 15, 2021, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after June 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted.

Amendments to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification®
Introduction

1. The Accounting Standards Codification is amended as described in paragraphs 2–13. In some cases, to put the change in
context, not only are the amended paragraphs shown but also the preceding and following paragraphs. Terms from the Master
Glossary are in bold type. Added text is underlined, and deleted text is struck out.

Amendments to Master Glossary
2. Add the following Master Glossary terms to Subtopic 958-605 as follows:

Most Advantageous Market

The market that maximizes the amount that would be received to sell the asset or minimizes the amount that would be paid
to transfer the liability, after taking into account transaction costs and transportation costs.

Principal Market

The market with the greatest volume and level of activity for the asset or liability.

Amendments to Subtopic 820-10
3. Add paragraph 820-10-50-2H, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Fair Value Measurement—Overall

Disclosure

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820-10-50-2H See paragraph 958-605-50-1A(d) through (e), which provides disclosures for a not-for-profit entity (NFP) that
recognizes contributed nonfinancial assets within the scope of Subtopic 958-605. Paragraph 958-605-50-1A(d) requires that
an NFP disclose a description of the valuation techniques and inputs used in fair value measurement of those assets in
accordance with paragraph 820-10-50-2(bbb)(1) at initial recognition.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-10
4. Add paragraph 958-10-65-4 and its related heading as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Overall

Transition and Open Effective Date Information

> Transition Related to Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-07, Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958): Presentation
and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-10-65-4 The following represents the transition and effective date information related to Accounting Standards Update
No. 2020-07, Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958): Presentation and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed
Nonfinancial Assets:

a. The pending content that links to this paragraph shall be effective for a not-for-profit entity (NFP) for annual periods beginning
after June 15, 2021, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after June 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted.

b. An NFP shall apply the pending content that links to this paragraph retrospectively to all periods presented.
c. An NFP shall provide the transition disclosures required by paragraph 250-10-50-1 in the period of adoption.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-205
5. Add paragraph 958-205-45-36 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Presentation of Financial Statements

Other Presentation Matters

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-205-45-36 An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets, as discussed in paragraph 958-605-45-7A.

6. Amend paragraphs 958-205-55-13 through 55-17 and 958-205-55-21, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as
follows:

Implementation Guidance and Illustrations

> Illustrations

> > Example 1: Illustrative Financial Statements

> > > Statement of Activities

958-205-55-10 The following illustrates the requirements of Subtopic 958-220. Three formats of statements of activities are
presented. To facilitate comparison of the formats, the same level of aggregation is used in each of the statements of
activities. The guidance in Subtopic 958-220 permits flexibility to present information in a number of ways as long as the
requirements are met. Each format has certain advantages, as follows:

a. Format A reports information in a single column. That format most easily accommodates presentation of multiyear comparative
information.

b. Format B reports the same information in columnar (or multicolumn) format with a column for each class of net assets. Use of a
total column is optional as long as the change in total net assets is presented in accordance with paragraph 958-210-45-1. That
format makes evident that the effects of expirations on donor restrictions result in reclassification of net assets. It also
accommodates presentation of aggregated information about contributions and investment return for the entity as a whole.
However, care is needed for labels and headings to ensure that they clearly communicate all columns and subtotals.

c. Format C reports information in two statements with summary amounts from a statement of revenues, expenses, and other
changes in net assets without donor restrictions (Part 1 of 2) and a statement of changes in net assets (Part 2 of 2). Alternative
formats for the statement of changes in net assets—a single-column and a multicolumn or columnar—are illustrated. The two-
statement format focuses attention first on changes in net assets without donor restrictions. That format may be preferred by
membership organizations and other NFPs that view certain transactions and events, including the receipts of donor-restricted
revenues and gains from contributions and investment return, as incidental or insignificant to their daily operations.

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958-205-55-11 The three illustrative statements of activities show items of revenues and gains first, then expenses, then
losses; reclassification of net assets, which must be shown separately, is reported with revenues and gains. Those items
could be arranged in other ways and other subtotals may be included. For example, the items may be sequenced using any
one of the following sequences:

a. Revenues, expenses, gains and losses, and reclassification of net assets shown last
b. Certain revenues, less directly related expenses, followed by a subtotal, then other revenues, other expenses, gains and losses,

and reclassification of net assets
c. Expenses followed by revenues, gains and losses, and the reclassification of net assets.

Although in the illustrative statements of activities, expenses are reported by nature in the single-column format example and
by function in the multicolumn format example, expenses may be reported in the statement of activities by either natural
classification or functional classification or by both.

958-205-55-12 The following provide additional illustrations of statements of activities:

a. Example 1 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-5) provides an illustration that shows how items may be sequenced to
distinguish between operating and nonoperating activities or to make other distinctions, if desired.

b. Example 2 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-7) illustrates the display of an appropriately labeled subtotal for
change in a class of net assets before the effects of a discontinued operation.

c. Example 3 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-8) provides three possible methods of displaying fundraising efforts in
the revenue section of the statement of activities if an NFP acts as an agent, trustee, or intermediary in raising resources for
another.

d. Example 1 in Subtopic 958-320 (see paragraph 958-320-55-4) provides an illustration of an NFP that presents:

1. Net investment return
2. Appropriation of funds from the quasi-endowment
3. Appropriation of funds from a donor-restricted endowment fund in which the purpose restrictions on the appropriated

amount have been met during the period.
958-205-55-13 Format A (a single-column format) is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-14 Format B (a multicolumn format) is as follows.

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958-205-55-15 Format C, Part 1 of 2 is as follows.

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958-205-55-16 Format C, Part 2 of 2 is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-17 Format C, Part 2 of 2 (Alternate) is as follows.

 View image

> > > Notes to Financial Statements

958-205-55-21 The following are illustrative notes to financial statements. Note B provides information required by paragraph
958-210-45-9. Note DD provides information required by paragraph 958-210-45-11. Note F provides information required by
paragraph 958-720-45-15. Note G provides information required by paragraphs 958-210-45-7(c) and 958-210-50-1A. Note D
and Note E provide information that is useful to users but is not explicitly required. Note H provides information required by
paragraphs 230-10-50-7 through 50-8. Comparative statements of financial position are provided in the illustrative example
in paragraph 958-205-55-9 only to facilitate understanding of the statement of cash flows. For purposes of applying
paragraphs 230-10-50-7 through 50-8 to this illustrative example, assume that the year ended June 30, 20X1, is the only
period for which a statement of financial position is presented. Additional disclosure examples for contributed nonfinancial
assets recognized are illustrated in paragraph 958-605-55-70U. Additional endowment disclosure requirements are illustrated
in Example 3 included in this Section. All amounts are in thousands.

[The remainder of this paragraph is not shown here because it is unchanged.]

Amendments to Subtopic 958-220
7. Add paragraph 958-220-45-31 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income

Other Presentation Matters

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-220-45-31 An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets, as discussed in paragraph 958-605-45-7A. See paragraph 958-
605-50-1A for disclosure requirements for contributed nonfinancial assets.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-605
8. Add paragraphs 958-605-45-7A, 958-605-50-1A through 50-1B, and 958-605-55-70U through 55-70W and the related
headings and supersede paragraph 958-605-50-1 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4,
as follows:

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Not-for-Profit Entities—Revenue Recognition

Other Presentation Matters

Contributions Received

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-45-7A An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets. See paragraph 958-605-50-1A for disclosure requirements for
contributed nonfinancial assets.

Disclosure

Contributions Received

> Contributed Services

958-605-50-1 Paragraph superseded by Accounting Standards Update No. 2020 – 07. An entity that receives contributed
services shall describe the programs or activities for which those services were used, including the nature and extent of
contributed services received for the period and the amount recognized as revenues for the period. Entities are encouraged
to disclose the fair value of contributed services received but not recognized as revenues if that is practicable. The nature
and extent of contributed services received can be described by nonmonetary information, such as the number and trends
of donated hours received or service outputs provided by volunteer efforts, or other monetary information, such as the
dollar amount of contributions raised by volunteers. Disclosure of contributed services is required regardless of whether
the services received are recognized as revenue in the financial statements. [Content amended and moved to paragraph
958-605-50-1B]

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-50-1A A not-for-profit entity (NFP) shall disclose in the notes to financial statements a disaggregation of the
amount of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities by category that depicts the type
of contributed nonfinancial assets. For each category of contributed nonfinancial assets, an NFP also shall disclose the
following:

a. Qualitative information about whether contributed nonfinancial assets were either monetized or utilized during the reporting
period. If utilized, a description of the programs or other activities in which those assets were used shall be disclosed.

b. The NFP’s policy (if any) about monetizing rather than utilizing contributed nonfinancial assets.
c. A description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.
d. A description of the valuation techniques and inputs used to arrive at a fair value measure in accordance with paragraph 820-

10-50-2( bbb )( 1), at initial recognition.
e. The principal market (or most advantageous market ) used to arrive at a fair value measure if it is a market in which the

recipient NFP is prohibited by a donor-imposed restriction from selling or using the contributed nonfinancial assets.
See paragraph 958-605-50-1B for additional disclosures for contributed services.

> Contributed Services

958-605-50-1B An entity (NFPs and business entities) that receives contributed services shall describe the programs or
activities for which those services were used, including the nature and extent of contributed services received for the
period and the amount recognized as revenues for the period. Entities are encouraged to disclose the {remove glossary
link}fair value{remove glossary link} of contributed services received but not recognized as revenues if that is
practicable. The nature and extent of contributed services received can be described by nonmonetary information, such as
the number and trends of donated hours received or service outputs provided by volunteer efforts, or other monetary
information, such as the dollar amount of contributions raised by volunteers. Disclosure of contributed services is required
regardless of whether the services received are recognized as revenue in the financial statements. [Content amended as
shown and moved from paragraph 958-605-50-1]

Implementation Guidance and Illustrations

Contributions Received

> Illustrations

> > Example 22: Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-55-70U This Example illustrates the requirements described in paragraph 958-605-50-1A. Those disclosure
requirements are not prescriptive on how the information should be disclosed; therefore, this Example demonstrates two
alternative formats. This Example does not illustrate all categories of contributed nonfinancial assets, such as intangible
assets. An NFP may be required to include disclosure information about valuation techniques and inputs, including
assumptions and judgments that an NFP makes, in addition to those included in this Example, which is consistent with the
fair value disclosures required by Topic 820. The valuation language used in this Example is not intended to provide
guidance on how contributions of nonfinancial assets should be valued, including whether the principal market (or most

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advantageous market) disclosed is appropriate in the circumstances. While not illustrated in this Example, there may be
additional information about the nature and extent of contributed services, including nonrecognized contributed services,
that an entity may disclose in accordance with paragraph 958-605-50-1B.

958-605-55-70V The following illustration includes a table disclosing the amounts recognized within the statement of
activities by category as well as a narrative disclosure about donor-imposed restrictions and valuation techniques and
inputs for each category of contributed nonfinancial asset.

[For ease of readability, the new table is not underlined.]

Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

For the years ended December 31, contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities included:

20X9 20X8

Building $ 5 50,000 $ –

Household goods 95,556 100,486

Food 85,407 86,633

Medical Supplies 90,389 115,173

Pharmaceuticals 111,876 113,982

Clothing 85,765 83,890

Vehicles 127,900 –

Services 73,890 65,392

$ 1,220,783 $ 5 65,556

NFP K recognized contributed nonfinancial assets within revenue, including a contributed building, vehicles, household
goods, food, medical supplies, pharmaceuticals, clothing, and services. Unless otherwise noted, contributed nonfinancial
assets did not have donor-imposed restrictions.

It is NFP K’s policy to sell all contributed vehicles immediately upon receipt at auction or for salvage unless the vehicle is
restricted for use in a specific program by the donor. No vehicles received during the period were restricted for use. All
vehicles were sold and valued according to the actual cash proceeds on their disposition.

The contributed building will be used for general and administrative activities. In valuing the contributed building, which is
located in Metropolitan Area B, NFP K estimated the fair value on the basis of recent comparable sales prices in
Metropolitan Area B’s real estate market.

Contributed food was utilized in the following programs: natural disaster services, domestic community development, and
services to community shelters. Contributed household goods were used in domestic community development and
services to community shelters. Contributed clothing was used in specific community shelters. Contributed medical
supplies were utilized in natural disaster services. In valuing household goods, food, clothing, and medical supplies, NFP K
estimated the fair value on the basis of estimates of wholesale values that would be received for selling similar products in
the United States.

Contributed pharmaceuticals were restricted by donors to use outside the United States and were utilized in international
health services and natural disaster services. In valuing contributed pharmaceuticals otherwise legally permissible for sale
in the United States, NFP K used the Federal Upper Limit based on the weighted average of the most recently reported
monthly Average Manufacturer Prices (AMP) that approximate wholesale prices in the United States (that is, the principal
market). In valuing pharmaceuticals not legally permissible for sale in the United States (and primarily consumed in
developing markets), NFP K used third – party sources representing wholesale exit prices in the developing markets in
which the products are approved for sale (that is, the principal markets).

Contributed services recognized comprise professional services from attorneys advising NFP K on various administrative
legal matters. Contributed services are valued and are reported at the estimated fair value in the financial statements based

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on current rates for similar legal services.

958-605-55-70W The following table illustrates the disclosures in paragraph 958 – 605-55-70V for each category of
contributed nonfinancial asset. It includes both amounts and narrative disclosure. For illustrative purposes, only one year is
presented.

[For ease of readability, the new table is not underlined.]

Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

Revenue Recognized Utilization in Programs/Activities Donor
Restrictions

Valu
Tech
and

Building $550,000 General and Administrative No
associated
donor
restrictions

In va
cont
build
is loc
Metr
Area
estim
fair v
basis
com
sales
Metr
Area
estat

Household
goods

$95,556 Domestic Community Development; Community
Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Food $85,407 Natural Disaster Services;
Domestic Community Development; Community
Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Medical
supplies

$90,389 Natural Disaster Services No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Pharmaceuticals $111,876

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International Health Services; Natural Disaster
Services

Restricted to
use outside
the United
States

In va
cont
phar
othe
lega
perm
sale
Unite
NFP
Fede
Limit
the w
aver
mos
repo
mon
Aver
Man
Price
that
appr
who
price
Unite
(that
princ
mark
valui
phar
not l
perm
sale
Unite
(and
cons
deve
mark
used
sour
repre
who
price
deve
mark
whic
prod
appr
sale.

Clothing $85,765 Natural Disaster Services; Domestic Community
Development; Community Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

In va
cloth
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Vehicles $127,900 It is NFP K’s policy to sell all contributed
vehicles immediately upon receipt unless the
vehicle is restricted for use in a specific
program by the donor. All vehicles received
were sold.

No
associated
donor
restrictions

Proc
vehic
are v
acco
actu
proc
their

Services $73,890 Various Administrative legal matters

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No
associated
donor
restrictions

Cont
serv
attor
value
estim
value
curre
simil
serv

Amendments to Status Sections
9. Amend paragraph 820-10-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

820-10-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

820-10-50-2H Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

10. Amend paragraph 958-10-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

958-10-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-10-65-4 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

11. Amend paragraph 958-205-00-1, by adding the following items to the table, as follows:

958-205-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-205-45-36 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-205-55-13
through 55-17

Amended 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-205-55-21 Amended 2020-07 09/17/2020

12. Amend paragraph 958-220-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

958-220-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-220-45-31 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

13. Amend paragraph 958-605-00-1, by adding the following items to the table, as follows:

958-605-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

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Paragraph Action Accounting
Standards Update

Date

Most
Advantageous
Market

Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

Principal Market Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-45-7A Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1 Superseded 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1A Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1B Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-55-70U
through 55-70W

Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

The amendments in this Update were adopted by the unanimous vote of the seven members of the Financial Accounting
Standards Board:

Richard R. Jones, Chairman
James L. Kroeker, Vice Chairman
Christine A. Botosan
Gary R. Buesser
Susan M. Cosper
Marsha L. Hunt
R. Harold Schroeder

Background Information and Basis for Conclusions
Introduction

BC1. The following summarizes the Board’s considerations in reaching the conclusions in this Update. It includes reasons for
accepting certain approaches and rejecting others. Individual Board members gave greater weight to some factors than to
others.

BC2. The Board is issuing the amendments in this Update to enhance the transparency of an NFP’s reporting of contributed
nonfinancial assets by requiring additional presentation and disclosure requirements for those contributions.

Background Information

BC3. Stakeholders raised concerns about an NFP’s reporting of gifts

Accounting homework help


Business Analytics


Introduction:

In this coursework report, the detailed analysis of sales data is performed through IBM SPSS Statistics Software. Sales data analysis is the procedure of gaining insights from sales data, their tendencies, and metrics to analyse sales performance of products. Sales analysis provides information about trends in sales performance, potential opportunities, top-performing sales products, increased sales activities and distribution trends. A product sales analysis assists in identifying top-selling products and under-performing variants, as well as comparing product sales of different products and their variants. It also demonstrates the features of a product which stimulate the interest of buyers and how anyone may use them to promote purchasing intentions. This report analyzes the sales data of a year with their weekly unit prices and weekly distribution. This report includes the visual representation of volumes of sales data for all variants; for the visual representation, the sales trajectories of all variants are illustrated. The summary statistics of all 13 variants is also demonstrated to compare the sales of each variant in 52 weeks. The top-selling variants are also identified based on their average sales. The relationship between the various prices of all variants is identified through correlation analysis. The closely related variants are determined on the basis of their correlation analysis. The methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity are also proposed in this report. The Exploratory Factor analysis is conducted for weekly distribution of all variants and the multivariate regression analysis is performed to identify which prices have direct influence on the sales of 2nd Variant. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 is used for designing line charts, analysing summary statistics, correlation analysis, multilevel regression analysis and exploratory factor analysis. The analysis is presented through graphs and tables for the better understanding of the data.


Question no 1 – Part a:


Visual Representation of Volume of Sales for all Variants

The visual representation of volume of sales and sale trajectories of all variants was designed separately through line charts in SPSS. These sale trajectories presented on line charts are demonstrated as follows:


Sales Trajectory of Variants

Sales trajectory of variant 1 is represented in Graph 1.

Graph 1: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 1

Graph 1 represents that sale trajectory of variant 1 was high on 4th, 5th and 44th week while the sales volume was lowest in 15th week. The sales volume decreased after the 44th week to the end of the year. These finding of graph presents the effective performance of variant 1.

Sales trajectory of variant 2 is represented in Graph 2.

Graph 2: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 2

Graph 2 represents that sale trajectory of variant 2 was high on only 2nd week while the sales volume was lowest in 20th week. After the 20th week, the sales of variant 2 increased based on several weeks which represent the suitable performance of variant 2.

Sales trajectory of variant 3 is represented in Graph 3.

Graph 3: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 3

Graph 3 represents that sale trajectory of variant 3 was high on only 40th week while the sales volume was lowest in 24th week. The sales trajectory was reduced after the 5th week and till the 24th week and the after the increase at the 40th week, the sales again reduced. These findings of graph 3 represent the normal performance of variant 3.

Sales trajectory of variant 4 is represented in Graph 4.

Graph 4: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 4

Graph 4 represents that sale trajectory of variant 4 was high on only 5th week while the sales volume was lowest in 51st week. The sales of variant 4 reduced week after week; therefore the performance of variant 4 is poor.

Sales trajectory of variant 5 is represented in Graph 5.

Graph 5: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 5

Graph 5 represents that sale trajectory of variant 5 was high on only 1st week while the sales volume declined week after week, which represents the under-performance of variant 5.

Sales trajectory of variant 6 is represented in Graph 6.

Graph 6: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 6

Graph 6 represents that sale trajectory of variant 6 was high on 45 week while the sales volume was lowest in 40 week. The sales trajectory of variant 6 increased from the initial week and then reduced after the 25th week till 40th week and again increased. These patterns of sales trajectory of variant 6 represent its satisfactory performance.

Sales trajectory of variant 7 is represented in Graph 7.

Graph 7: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 7

Graph 7 represents the high sales in the initial weeks which then reduced till the 25th week and again increased followed by the reduction in sales. The sales of variant 7 in the last week of the year were similar to the sales in the first week. These findings represent the significant performance of variant 7.

Sales trajectory of variant 8 is represented in Graph 8.

Graph 8: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 8

Graph 8 represents that sale trajectory of variant 8 was high on only 35th week while the sales volume declined week after week which indicated the under-performance of variant 8.

Sales trajectory of variant 9 is represented in Graph 9.

Graph 9: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 9

Graph 9 represents that sale trajectory of variant 9 is struggled to maintain the stable position. The sales of variant 9 were highest at the 26th week and the sales decline and increased week after week which indicates the good performance of variant 9.

Sales trajectory of variant 10 is represented in Graph 10.

Graph 10: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 10

Graph 10 also represents the struggling sale trajectory of variant 10. The sales of variant 10 were high on 27th week and the struggling pattern of the sales demonstrating increase and decrease in sales week after week represents the good performance of variant 10.

Sales trajectory of variant 11 is represented in Graph 11.

Graph 11: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 11

Graph 11 represents that sales trajectory of variant 11 was lowest in the initial weeks while the sales were highest at the 34th to 35th week and again the sales declined which represents the poor performance of variant 11.

Sales trajectory of variant 12 is represented in Graph 12.

Graph 12: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 12

Graph 12 represent that the sales of variant 12 declined from the initial years to the lowest sales in the last week of the year. These findings of graph 12 present the poor performance of variant 12.

Sales trajectory of variant 13 is represented in Graph 13.

Graph 13: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 13

Graph 13 represents that the sales of variant 13 reduced in the 10th week from the initial years and the sales were highest at the 30th week which again declined followed by increase in sales. These findings present the normal performance of variant 13.


Summary Statistics of all Variants

The summary statistics of all 13 variants were analysed through SPSS and are presented in Table 1:

Table 1: Summary Statistics of Variants

Mean

Median

Std. Deviation

Minimum

Maximum

Sales_Variant_1

340863.05

342122.60

33099.908

276408

407164

Sales_Variant_2

128618.41

127768.57

38715.088

63859

218480

Sales_Variant_3

52650.48

53637.83

26089.365

9855

109834

Sales_Variant_4

3168.35

1626.15

3529.989

49

11955

Sales_Variant_5

7851.72

1624.13

13588.322

16

57485

Sales_Variant_6

25254.77

22075.54

15938.630

948

68557

Sales_Variant_7

38559.44

39037.25

12353.866

11131

71377

Sales_Variant_8

1133.64

.00

1686.843

0

5200

Sales_Variant_9

212244.64

205227.52

28441.114

160775

285225

Sales_Variant_10

183583.33

178993.56

27352.637

132821

252682

Sales_Variant_11

21799.41

21137.08

6113.736

14403

43193

Sales_Variant_12

6044.75

8028.62

3533.977

205

10780

Sales_Variant_13

817.16

802.38

152.083

554

1315

Valid N (listwise)

Table 1 represents that the Variant 1 of weekly sales volume has the highest mean of 340863.05 followed by Variant 9 with mean 212244.64 while Variant 13 has the lowest mean value of 817.16. Table 1 demonstrates that Variant 1 has highest weekly sales from the remaining variants, the average sales of variant 9 are 212244.64 and variant 10 has average sales of 183583.33 while Variant 13 has lowest sales with mean value of 817.16 followed by variant 8 with mean of 1133.64. The median value of variant 8 is zero which indicates its reduced sales in a year. The standard deviation of all variants represents the dispersion of the sales and the variants with high standard deviation to their mean values has high dispersion while the low standard deviation values with mean indicate the low dispersion of sales data.

The minimum weekly sales of variant 1 are 276408 while the maximum sales are 407164 while the minimum weekly sales of variant 4 is 49, variant 5 is 16, variant 12 is 205 and variant 13 has minimum sales of 554 while the minimum sales of variant 8 is 0. These findings represents that variant 1 and variant 9 has highest weekly sales while variant 13 and variant 8 has lowest weekly sales in a year.


Part (b)


Top Four Selling Variants:

The top four selling variants from all thirteen variants are following:

· Variant 1

· Variant 9

· Variant 10

· Variant 2

The top 4 selling variants are presented in Figure 1 in a pie chart.

Figure 1: Top four Selling Variables

Figure 1 represents that these Variants has high sales based on their mean and maximum sales values. The average sales volume of variant 1 is 340863.05, variant 10 is 128618.41, variant 9 is 212244.64 and variant 2 is 183583.33. The maximum sales volume value of Variant 1 is 407164, Variant 9 has maximum sales value of 285225, and Variant 10 has maximum sales volume value of 252682, while Variant 2 has maximum sales value of 21848.


Question no 2:


Part (a)


Correlation Analysis

Correlation analysis determines the correlation between the different variables. The analysis also measures the strength of the correlation between variables. The correlation is significant at the level of 0.01 or less than 0.01 and less than 0.05. The correlation analysis was conducted for determining the relationship between the various prices. The correlation analysis is presented in Table 2:

Table 2: Correlation Analysis of Various Prices

Correlations

Prices Variant 1

Prices Variant2

Prices Variant3

Prices Variant 4

Prices Variant 5

Prices Variant 6

Prices Variant 7

Priced Variant 8

Prices Variant 9

Prices Variant 10

Prices Variant 11

Prices Variant 12

Prices Variant 13

Prices

Variant1

Pearson Correlation

1

.263

.185

-.187

-.155

.314*

-.001

-.192

.560**

.518**

.145

.089

.546**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.059

.189

.185

.272

.023

.992

.173

.000

.000

.305

.530

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices

Variant2

Pearson Correlation

.263

1

.314*

.154

-.084

.282*

.336*

-.478**

-.046

.103

.478**

.419**

.463**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.059

.023

.277

.552

.043

.015

.000

.744

.469

.000

.002

.001

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant3

Pearson Correlation

.185

.314*

1

-.254

-.003

.660**

.590**

-.694**

-.005

.128

.690**

.533**

.128

Sig. (2-tailed)

.189

.023

.069

.981

.000

.000

.000

.970

.365

.000

.000

.364

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant4

Pearson Correlation

-.187

.154

-.254

1

.046

-.221

-.238

.260

-.046

-.012

-.197

-.020

-.144

Sig. (2-tailed)

.185

.277

.069

.748

.115

.089

.063

.746

.931

.161

.887

.307

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices

Variant5

Pearson Correlation

-.155

-.084

-.003

.046

1

-.022

-.057

-.029

-.320*

-.441**

.035

.327*

-.089

Sig. (2-tailed)

.272

.552

.981

.748

.874

.686

.840

.021

.001

.805

.018

.533

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant6

Pearson Correlation

.314*

.282*

.660**

-.221

-.022

1

.670**

-.610**

.208

.383**

.577**

.461**

.142

Sig. (2-tailed)

.023

.043

.000

.115

.874

.000

.000

.138

.005

.000

.001

.315

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant7

Pearson Correlation

-.001

.336*

.590**

-.238

-.057

.670**

1

-.699**

-.095

.101

.660**

.533**

.091

Sig. (2-tailed)

.992

.015

.000

.089

.686

.000

.000

.504

.478

.000

.000

.522

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant8

Pearson Correlation

-.192

-.478**

-.694**

.260

-.029

-.610**

-.699**

1

.056

-.083

-.941**

-.831**

-.486**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.173

.000

.000

.063

.840

.000

.000

.692

.559

.000

.000

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant9

Pearson Correlation

.560**

-.046

-.005

-.046

-.320*

.208

-.095

.056

1

.923**

.064

-.160

.372**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.744

.970

.746

.021

.138

.504

.692

.000

.652

.258

.007

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

10

Pearson Correlation

.518**

.103

.128

-.012

-.441**

.383**

.101

-.083

.923**

1

.171

-.057

.319*

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.469

.365

.931

.001

.005

.478

.559

.000

.224

.688

.021

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

11

Pearson Correlation

.145

.478**

.690**

-.197

.035

.577**

.660**

-.941**

.064

.171

1

.800**

.502**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.305

.000

.000

.161

.805

.000

.000

.000

.652

.224

.000

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant 12

Pearson Correlation

.089

.419**

.533**

-.020

.327*

.461**

.533**

-.831**

-.160

-.057

.800**

1

.375**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.530

.002

.000

.887

.018

.001

.000

.000

.258

.688

.000

.006

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

13

Pearson Correlation

.546**

.463**

.128

-.144

-.089

.142

.091

-.486**

.372**

.319*

.502**

.375**

1

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.001

.364

.307

.533

.315

.522

.000

.007

.021

.000

.006

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

*. Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed).

**. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Table 2 represents the significant correlation between various prices. The findings of correlation analysis are as follows: unit price of Variant 1 is significantly correlated with the unit price of Variant 9, 10 and 13. In addition, unit price of Variant 2 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 8, 11 and13. The unit price of Variant 3 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 6, 7, 8, 11 and12. While the unit price of Variant 4 is not significantly correlated with any of other variants. In addition, unit price of Variant 5 is only correlated with unit price of Variant 10. Moreover, unit price of Variant 9 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 1 and 10.


Part (b)


Closely Related Variant – In Terms of Prices

The correlation analysis in Table 2 has presented various variants that are closely related to each other in terms of their prices. The analysis demonstrated that prices of Variant 10 are closely and strongly related with prices of Variant 9.In addition, prices of Variant 11 are closely related with Variant 12. The prices of Variant 1 are closely related to prices of Variant 9. The prices of Variant 3 are closely related to prices of Variant 2 and Variant 8 and prices of Variant 7 are closely related with prices of Variant 8.


Methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity:

There are various methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity, some of these methods include:


Detecting Multicollinearity:

Variation Inflation Factor can be used to detect the multicollinearity between the variables. In addition correlation matrix and correlation plot method can be also used for detecting the multicollinearity


Solving Multicollinearity:

The methods which can be used to solve multicollinearity are as follows:

· The removal of one or more variables with a high correlation is a simple method of correcting multicollinearity. It significantly reduces the multicollinearity between correlated variables.

· Methodologies such as partial least squares regression and principal component analysis are also used for solving the multicollinearity.

· Through the breakdown of data into independent variables, PCA decreases the dimension of data. As a result, new variables with no association are generated.

· Centering the data can also solve the multicollinearity issues.


Part (c)


Exploratory factor analysis of Distribution Variants

Exploratory factor analysis is a statistical approach for reducing data into a smaller number of summary variables and exploring the phenomena’s fundamental theoretical structure. It’s implemented to find out how the relationship between the variable and the respondent is structured. The Exploratory factor analysis of Distribution variants is conducted through SPSS. KMO and Bartlett’s test is presented in Table 3:

Table 3: KMO and Bartlett’s test

KMO and Bartlett’s Test

Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.

.612

Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity

Approx. Chi-Square

1024.101

df

78

Sig.

.000

Table 3 represents the findings of KMO and Bartlett’s test. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) statistic evaluate the appropriateness of factor analysis and a high test statistic between 0.5 and 1 indicates that the data is appropriate for factor analysis.

Accounting homework help

Writing Guide

Is Chocolate Good for You?

Eating dark chocolate regularly is good for your health. Several recent studies have compared the mortality rate of those who eat dark chocolate to the mortality rate of those who do not eat dark chocolate and found that the dark chocolate eaters live longer on average. For example, a recent peer-reviewed article in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) found that eaters of dark chocolate had on average 5% fewer heart attacks, 10% fewer strokes and lived on average 2 years longer than those who did not regularly eat dark chocolate. No similar benefit was found for those who ate milk or white chocolate1.

Some observers have warned that chocolate is high in fat and has added sugar to soften the bitter taste of unsweetened chocolate. Both fat and sugar have been blamed for contributing to America’s obesity epidemic. However, the results from the NEJM study cited above, and from other studies, indicate that the benefits of eating dark chocolate outweigh the risks.

In summary, the studies indicate that it might be beneficial for those who like dark chocolate to consume moderate amounts regularly. The potential benefits could also be obtained by those who do not like chocolate by exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet and controlling weight. And the risk is that one might overdo a good thing and gain weight from too much chocolate. But on balance regular consumption of a moderate amount of dark chocolate has life-aiding benefits.

1) New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. x, No. x, January 1, 20xx.

Note: This essay is entirely fictional. It was created solely to illustrate the points about conclusion, supporting arguments, numerical facts, counter-arguments, and a restatement of the conclusion.

Color coding:

Conclusion

Supporting argument

Facts supporting the conclusion

Acknowledging the counter arguments

Summary/restatement of conclusion

For real information about dark chocolate, go to this web site:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/mar/25/chocolate-the-dark-truth-is-it-good-for-you-health-wellbeing-blood-pressure-flavanols

Accounting homework help

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Not for profit entities (Topic 958)
Publication date: 18 Sep 2020   

Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-07
September 2020

Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958)

Presentation and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

An Amendment of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification®

The FASB Accounting Standards Codification® is the source of authoritative generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)
recognized by the FASB to be applied by nongovernmental entities. An Accounting Standards Update is not authoritative;
rather, it is a document that communicates how the Accounting Standards Codification is being amended. It also provides
other information to help a user of GAAP understand how and why GAAP is changing and when the changes will be effective.

For additional copies of this Accounting Standards Update and information on applicable prices and discount rates contact:

Order Department
Financial Accounting Standards Board
401 Merritt 7
PO Box 5116
Norwalk, CT 06856-5116

Please ask for our Product Code No. ASU2020-07.

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING SERIES (ISSN 0885-9051) is published monthly with the exception of May, July, and October by the
Financial Accounting Foundation, 401 Merritt 7, PO Box 5116, Norwalk, CT 06856-5116. Periodicals postage paid at Norwalk,
CT and at additional mailing offices. The full subscription rate is $312 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
Financial Accounting Series, 401 Merritt 7, PO Box 5116, Norwalk, CT 06856-5116. | No. 498

Copyright © 2020 by Financial Accounting Foundation. All rights reserved. Content
copyrighted by Financial Accounting Foundation may not be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the
Financial Accounting Foundation. Financial Accounting Foundation claims no copyright
in any portion hereof that constitutes a work of the United States Government.

Summary
Why Is the FASB Issuing This Accounting Standards Update (Update)?

The Board is issuing this Update to improve generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) by increasing the transparency of
contributed nonfinancial assets for not-for-profit (NFP) entities through enhancements to presentation and disclosure. The
amendments in this Update address certain stakeholders’ concerns about the lack of transparency about the measurement of
contributed nonfinancial assets recognized by NFPs, as well as the amount of those contributions used in an NFP’s programs
and other activities.

Who Is Affected by the Amendments in This Update?

The amendments in this Update apply to NFPs that receive contributed nonfinancial assets. Contribution revenue may be
presented in the financial statements using different terms (for example, gifts, donations, grants, gifts-in-kind, donated services,
or other terms). The amendments address presentation and disclosure of contributed nonfinancial assets. Contribution and
nonfinancial asset are both defined terms in the Master Glossary of the Codification and are understood in practice. The term
nonfinancial asset includes fixed assets (such as land, buildings, and equipment), use of fixed assets or utilities, materials and
supplies, intangible assets, services, and unconditional promises of those assets.

What Are the Main Provisions?

Viewpoint

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The amendments in this Update require that an NFP:

1. Present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities, apart from contributions of cash and
other financial assets.

2. Disclose:

a. A disaggregation of the amount of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities by
category that depicts the type of contributed nonfinancial assets.

b. For each category of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized (as identified in (a)):

i. Qualitative information about whether the contributed nonfinancial assets were either monetized or utilized
during the reporting period. If utilized, an NFP will disclose a description of the programs or other activities
in which those assets were used.

ii. The NFP’s policy (if any) about monetizing rather than utilizing contributed nonfinancial assets. iii. A
description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.

iii. A description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.
iv. A description of the valuation techniques and inputs used to arrive at a fair value measure, in accordance

with the requirements in Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement, at initial recognition.
v. The principal market (or most advantageous market) used to arrive at a fair value measure if it is a market in

which the recipient NFP is prohibited by a donor-imposed restriction from selling or using the contributed
nonfinancial assets.

How Do the Main Provisions Differ from Current Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and Why Are They
an Improvement?

Subtopic 958-605, Not-for-Profit Entities—Revenue Recognition, specifies requirements for the recognition and initial
measurement of contributions and disclosure requirements for contributed services. Subtopic 958-605 does not include
specific presentation requirements for contributed nonfinancial assets or specific disclosure requirements for contributed
nonfinancial assets other than contributed services. The amendments in this Update improve financial reporting by providing
new presentation and disclosure requirements about contributed nonfinancial assets for NFPs, including additional disclosure
requirements for recognized contributed services. The amendments will not change the recognition and measurement
requirements in Subtopic 958-605 for those assets.

When Will the Amendments Be Effective and What Are the Transition Requirements?

The amendments in this Update should be applied on a retrospective basis and are effective for annual periods beginning after
June 15, 2021, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after June 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted.

Amendments to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification®
Introduction

1. The Accounting Standards Codification is amended as described in paragraphs 2–13. In some cases, to put the change in
context, not only are the amended paragraphs shown but also the preceding and following paragraphs. Terms from the Master
Glossary are in bold type. Added text is underlined, and deleted text is struck out.

Amendments to Master Glossary
2. Add the following Master Glossary terms to Subtopic 958-605 as follows:

Most Advantageous Market

The market that maximizes the amount that would be received to sell the asset or minimizes the amount that would be paid
to transfer the liability, after taking into account transaction costs and transportation costs.

Principal Market

The market with the greatest volume and level of activity for the asset or liability.

Amendments to Subtopic 820-10
3. Add paragraph 820-10-50-2H, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Fair Value Measurement—Overall

Disclosure

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820-10-50-2H See paragraph 958-605-50-1A(d) through (e), which provides disclosures for a not-for-profit entity (NFP) that
recognizes contributed nonfinancial assets within the scope of Subtopic 958-605. Paragraph 958-605-50-1A(d) requires that
an NFP disclose a description of the valuation techniques and inputs used in fair value measurement of those assets in
accordance with paragraph 820-10-50-2(bbb)(1) at initial recognition.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-10
4. Add paragraph 958-10-65-4 and its related heading as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Overall

Transition and Open Effective Date Information

> Transition Related to Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-07, Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958): Presentation
and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-10-65-4 The following represents the transition and effective date information related to Accounting Standards Update
No. 2020-07, Not-for-Profit Entities (Topic 958): Presentation and Disclosures by Not-for-Profit Entities for Contributed
Nonfinancial Assets:

a. The pending content that links to this paragraph shall be effective for a not-for-profit entity (NFP) for annual periods beginning
after June 15, 2021, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after June 15, 2022. Early adoption is permitted.

b. An NFP shall apply the pending content that links to this paragraph retrospectively to all periods presented.
c. An NFP shall provide the transition disclosures required by paragraph 250-10-50-1 in the period of adoption.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-205
5. Add paragraph 958-205-45-36 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Presentation of Financial Statements

Other Presentation Matters

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-205-45-36 An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets, as discussed in paragraph 958-605-45-7A.

6. Amend paragraphs 958-205-55-13 through 55-17 and 958-205-55-21, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as
follows:

Implementation Guidance and Illustrations

> Illustrations

> > Example 1: Illustrative Financial Statements

> > > Statement of Activities

958-205-55-10 The following illustrates the requirements of Subtopic 958-220. Three formats of statements of activities are
presented. To facilitate comparison of the formats, the same level of aggregation is used in each of the statements of
activities. The guidance in Subtopic 958-220 permits flexibility to present information in a number of ways as long as the
requirements are met. Each format has certain advantages, as follows:

a. Format A reports information in a single column. That format most easily accommodates presentation of multiyear comparative
information.

b. Format B reports the same information in columnar (or multicolumn) format with a column for each class of net assets. Use of a
total column is optional as long as the change in total net assets is presented in accordance with paragraph 958-210-45-1. That
format makes evident that the effects of expirations on donor restrictions result in reclassification of net assets. It also
accommodates presentation of aggregated information about contributions and investment return for the entity as a whole.
However, care is needed for labels and headings to ensure that they clearly communicate all columns and subtotals.

c. Format C reports information in two statements with summary amounts from a statement of revenues, expenses, and other
changes in net assets without donor restrictions (Part 1 of 2) and a statement of changes in net assets (Part 2 of 2). Alternative
formats for the statement of changes in net assets—a single-column and a multicolumn or columnar—are illustrated. The two-
statement format focuses attention first on changes in net assets without donor restrictions. That format may be preferred by
membership organizations and other NFPs that view certain transactions and events, including the receipts of donor-restricted
revenues and gains from contributions and investment return, as incidental or insignificant to their daily operations.

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958-205-55-11 The three illustrative statements of activities show items of revenues and gains first, then expenses, then
losses; reclassification of net assets, which must be shown separately, is reported with revenues and gains. Those items
could be arranged in other ways and other subtotals may be included. For example, the items may be sequenced using any
one of the following sequences:

a. Revenues, expenses, gains and losses, and reclassification of net assets shown last
b. Certain revenues, less directly related expenses, followed by a subtotal, then other revenues, other expenses, gains and losses,

and reclassification of net assets
c. Expenses followed by revenues, gains and losses, and the reclassification of net assets.

Although in the illustrative statements of activities, expenses are reported by nature in the single-column format example and
by function in the multicolumn format example, expenses may be reported in the statement of activities by either natural
classification or functional classification or by both.

958-205-55-12 The following provide additional illustrations of statements of activities:

a. Example 1 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-5) provides an illustration that shows how items may be sequenced to
distinguish between operating and nonoperating activities or to make other distinctions, if desired.

b. Example 2 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-7) illustrates the display of an appropriately labeled subtotal for
change in a class of net assets before the effects of a discontinued operation.

c. Example 3 in Subtopic 958-220 (see paragraph 958-220-55-8) provides three possible methods of displaying fundraising efforts in
the revenue section of the statement of activities if an NFP acts as an agent, trustee, or intermediary in raising resources for
another.

d. Example 1 in Subtopic 958-320 (see paragraph 958-320-55-4) provides an illustration of an NFP that presents:

1. Net investment return
2. Appropriation of funds from the quasi-endowment
3. Appropriation of funds from a donor-restricted endowment fund in which the purpose restrictions on the appropriated

amount have been met during the period.
958-205-55-13 Format A (a single-column format) is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-14 Format B (a multicolumn format) is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-15 Format C, Part 1 of 2 is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-16 Format C, Part 2 of 2 is as follows.

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 View image

958-205-55-17 Format C, Part 2 of 2 (Alternate) is as follows.

 View image

> > > Notes to Financial Statements

958-205-55-21 The following are illustrative notes to financial statements. Note B provides information required by paragraph
958-210-45-9. Note DD provides information required by paragraph 958-210-45-11. Note F provides information required by
paragraph 958-720-45-15. Note G provides information required by paragraphs 958-210-45-7(c) and 958-210-50-1A. Note D
and Note E provide information that is useful to users but is not explicitly required. Note H provides information required by
paragraphs 230-10-50-7 through 50-8. Comparative statements of financial position are provided in the illustrative example
in paragraph 958-205-55-9 only to facilitate understanding of the statement of cash flows. For purposes of applying
paragraphs 230-10-50-7 through 50-8 to this illustrative example, assume that the year ended June 30, 20X1, is the only
period for which a statement of financial position is presented. Additional disclosure examples for contributed nonfinancial
assets recognized are illustrated in paragraph 958-605-55-70U. Additional endowment disclosure requirements are illustrated
in Example 3 included in this Section. All amounts are in thousands.

[The remainder of this paragraph is not shown here because it is unchanged.]

Amendments to Subtopic 958-220
7. Add paragraph 958-220-45-31 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4, as follows:

Not-for-Profit Entities—Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income

Other Presentation Matters

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-220-45-31 An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets, as discussed in paragraph 958-605-45-7A. See paragraph 958-
605-50-1A for disclosure requirements for contributed nonfinancial assets.

Amendments to Subtopic 958-605
8. Add paragraphs 958-605-45-7A, 958-605-50-1A through 50-1B, and 958-605-55-70U through 55-70W and the related
headings and supersede paragraph 958-605-50-1 and its related heading, with a link to transition paragraph 958-10-65-4,
as follows:

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Not-for-Profit Entities—Revenue Recognition

Other Presentation Matters

Contributions Received

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-45-7A An NFP shall present contributed nonfinancial assets as a separate line item in the statement of activities,
apart from contributions of cash and other financial assets. See paragraph 958-605-50-1A for disclosure requirements for
contributed nonfinancial assets.

Disclosure

Contributions Received

> Contributed Services

958-605-50-1 Paragraph superseded by Accounting Standards Update No. 2020 – 07. An entity that receives contributed
services shall describe the programs or activities for which those services were used, including the nature and extent of
contributed services received for the period and the amount recognized as revenues for the period. Entities are encouraged
to disclose the fair value of contributed services received but not recognized as revenues if that is practicable. The nature
and extent of contributed services received can be described by nonmonetary information, such as the number and trends
of donated hours received or service outputs provided by volunteer efforts, or other monetary information, such as the
dollar amount of contributions raised by volunteers. Disclosure of contributed services is required regardless of whether
the services received are recognized as revenue in the financial statements. [Content amended and moved to paragraph
958-605-50-1B]

> Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-50-1A A not-for-profit entity (NFP) shall disclose in the notes to financial statements a disaggregation of the
amount of contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities by category that depicts the type
of contributed nonfinancial assets. For each category of contributed nonfinancial assets, an NFP also shall disclose the
following:

a. Qualitative information about whether contributed nonfinancial assets were either monetized or utilized during the reporting
period. If utilized, a description of the programs or other activities in which those assets were used shall be disclosed.

b. The NFP’s policy (if any) about monetizing rather than utilizing contributed nonfinancial assets.
c. A description of any donor-imposed restrictions associated with the contributed nonfinancial assets.
d. A description of the valuation techniques and inputs used to arrive at a fair value measure in accordance with paragraph 820-

10-50-2( bbb )( 1), at initial recognition.
e. The principal market (or most advantageous market ) used to arrive at a fair value measure if it is a market in which the

recipient NFP is prohibited by a donor-imposed restriction from selling or using the contributed nonfinancial assets.
See paragraph 958-605-50-1B for additional disclosures for contributed services.

> Contributed Services

958-605-50-1B An entity (NFPs and business entities) that receives contributed services shall describe the programs or
activities for which those services were used, including the nature and extent of contributed services received for the
period and the amount recognized as revenues for the period. Entities are encouraged to disclose the {remove glossary
link}fair value{remove glossary link} of contributed services received but not recognized as revenues if that is
practicable. The nature and extent of contributed services received can be described by nonmonetary information, such as
the number and trends of donated hours received or service outputs provided by volunteer efforts, or other monetary
information, such as the dollar amount of contributions raised by volunteers. Disclosure of contributed services is required
regardless of whether the services received are recognized as revenue in the financial statements. [Content amended as
shown and moved from paragraph 958-605-50-1]

Implementation Guidance and Illustrations

Contributions Received

> Illustrations

> > Example 22: Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

958-605-55-70U This Example illustrates the requirements described in paragraph 958-605-50-1A. Those disclosure
requirements are not prescriptive on how the information should be disclosed; therefore, this Example demonstrates two
alternative formats. This Example does not illustrate all categories of contributed nonfinancial assets, such as intangible
assets. An NFP may be required to include disclosure information about valuation techniques and inputs, including
assumptions and judgments that an NFP makes, in addition to those included in this Example, which is consistent with the
fair value disclosures required by Topic 820. The valuation language used in this Example is not intended to provide
guidance on how contributions of nonfinancial assets should be valued, including whether the principal market (or most

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10/17

advantageous market) disclosed is appropriate in the circumstances. While not illustrated in this Example, there may be
additional information about the nature and extent of contributed services, including nonrecognized contributed services,
that an entity may disclose in accordance with paragraph 958-605-50-1B.

958-605-55-70V The following illustration includes a table disclosing the amounts recognized within the statement of
activities by category as well as a narrative disclosure about donor-imposed restrictions and valuation techniques and
inputs for each category of contributed nonfinancial asset.

[For ease of readability, the new table is not underlined.]

Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

For the years ended December 31, contributed nonfinancial assets recognized within the statement of activities included:

20X9 20X8

Building $ 5 50,000 $ –

Household goods 95,556 100,486

Food 85,407 86,633

Medical Supplies 90,389 115,173

Pharmaceuticals 111,876 113,982

Clothing 85,765 83,890

Vehicles 127,900 –

Services 73,890 65,392

$ 1,220,783 $ 5 65,556

NFP K recognized contributed nonfinancial assets within revenue, including a contributed building, vehicles, household
goods, food, medical supplies, pharmaceuticals, clothing, and services. Unless otherwise noted, contributed nonfinancial
assets did not have donor-imposed restrictions.

It is NFP K’s policy to sell all contributed vehicles immediately upon receipt at auction or for salvage unless the vehicle is
restricted for use in a specific program by the donor. No vehicles received during the period were restricted for use. All
vehicles were sold and valued according to the actual cash proceeds on their disposition.

The contributed building will be used for general and administrative activities. In valuing the contributed building, which is
located in Metropolitan Area B, NFP K estimated the fair value on the basis of recent comparable sales prices in
Metropolitan Area B’s real estate market.

Contributed food was utilized in the following programs: natural disaster services, domestic community development, and
services to community shelters. Contributed household goods were used in domestic community development and
services to community shelters. Contributed clothing was used in specific community shelters. Contributed medical
supplies were utilized in natural disaster services. In valuing household goods, food, clothing, and medical supplies, NFP K
estimated the fair value on the basis of estimates of wholesale values that would be received for selling similar products in
the United States.

Contributed pharmaceuticals were restricted by donors to use outside the United States and were utilized in international
health services and natural disaster services. In valuing contributed pharmaceuticals otherwise legally permissible for sale
in the United States, NFP K used the Federal Upper Limit based on the weighted average of the most recently reported
monthly Average Manufacturer Prices (AMP) that approximate wholesale prices in the United States (that is, the principal
market). In valuing pharmaceuticals not legally permissible for sale in the United States (and primarily consumed in
developing markets), NFP K used third – party sources representing wholesale exit prices in the developing markets in
which the products are approved for sale (that is, the principal markets).

Contributed services recognized comprise professional services from attorneys advising NFP K on various administrative
legal matters. Contributed services are valued and are reported at the estimated fair value in the financial statements based

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on current rates for similar legal services.

958-605-55-70W The following table illustrates the disclosures in paragraph 958 – 605-55-70V for each category of
contributed nonfinancial asset. It includes both amounts and narrative disclosure. For illustrative purposes, only one year is
presented.

[For ease of readability, the new table is not underlined.]

Contributed Nonfinancial Assets

Revenue Recognized Utilization in Programs/Activities Donor
Restrictions

Valu
Tech
and

Building $550,000 General and Administrative No
associated
donor
restrictions

In va
cont
build
is loc
Metr
Area
estim
fair v
basis
com
sales
Metr
Area
estat

Household
goods

$95,556 Domestic Community Development; Community
Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Food $85,407 Natural Disaster Services;
Domestic Community Development; Community
Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Medical
supplies

$90,389 Natural Disaster Services No
associated
donor
restrictions

NFP
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Pharmaceuticals $111,876

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International Health Services; Natural Disaster
Services

Restricted to
use outside
the United
States

In va
cont
phar
othe
lega
perm
sale
Unite
NFP
Fede
Limit
the w
aver
mos
repo
mon
Aver
Man
Price
that
appr
who
price
Unite
(that
princ
mark
valui
phar
not l
perm
sale
Unite
(and
cons
deve
mark
used
sour
repre
who
price
deve
mark
whic
prod
appr
sale.

Clothing $85,765 Natural Disaster Services; Domestic Community
Development; Community Shelters

No
associated
donor
restrictions

In va
cloth
estim
fair v
basis
estim
who
value
wou
rece
sellin
prod
Unite

Vehicles $127,900 It is NFP K’s policy to sell all contributed
vehicles immediately upon receipt unless the
vehicle is restricted for use in a specific
program by the donor. All vehicles received
were sold.

No
associated
donor
restrictions

Proc
vehic
are v
acco
actu
proc
their

Services $73,890 Various Administrative legal matters

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No
associated
donor
restrictions

Cont
serv
attor
value
estim
value
curre
simil
serv

Amendments to Status Sections
9. Amend paragraph 820-10-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

820-10-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

820-10-50-2H Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

10. Amend paragraph 958-10-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

958-10-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-10-65-4 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

11. Amend paragraph 958-205-00-1, by adding the following items to the table, as follows:

958-205-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-205-45-36 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-205-55-13
through 55-17

Amended 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-205-55-21 Amended 2020-07 09/17/2020

12. Amend paragraph 958-220-00-1, by adding the following item to the table, as follows:

958-220-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

Paragraph Action
Accounting
Standards Update Date

958-220-45-31 Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

13. Amend paragraph 958-605-00-1, by adding the following items to the table, as follows:

958-605-00-1 The following table identifies the changes made to this Subtopic.

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Paragraph Action Accounting
Standards Update

Date

Most
Advantageous
Market

Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

Principal Market Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-45-7A Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1 Superseded 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1A Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-50-1B Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

958-605-55-70U
through 55-70W

Added 2020-07 09/17/2020

The amendments in this Update were adopted by the unanimous vote of the seven members of the Financial Accounting
Standards Board:

Richard R. Jones, Chairman
James L. Kroeker, Vice Chairman
Christine A. Botosan
Gary R. Buesser
Susan M. Cosper
Marsha L. Hunt
R. Harold Schroeder

Background Information and Basis for Conclusions
Introduction

BC1. The following summarizes the Board’s considerations in reaching the conclusions in this Update. It includes reasons for
accepting certain approaches and rejecting others. Individual Board members gave greater weight to some factors than to
others.

BC2. The Board is issuing the amendments in this Update to enhance the transparency of an NFP’s reporting of contributed
nonfinancial assets by requiring additional presentation and disclosure requirements for those contributions.

Background Information

BC3. Stakeholders raised concerns about an NFP’s reporting of gifts

Accounting homework help


Zeeshan Muhammad Tariq

Computerized Accounting ACCT-411

Table of Contents
SET UP FOR A NEW COMPANY 3
HOW TO OPEN AN EXISTING COMPANY 17
ENTERING CHART OF ACCOUNTS IN THE SOFTWARE 24
ENTERING THE BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE ACCOUNTS IN CHART OF ACCOUNTS 27
HOW TO CREATE CUSTOMER RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 30
HOW TO CREATE VENDOR RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 32
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE CUSTOMERS (IF ANY) 35
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE VENDORS (IF ANY) 36
HOW TO EDIT CUSTOMER WINDOW ITEMS 37
PAYMENT TERMS: 38
ACCOUNT AGING: 41
CUSTOM FIELDS: 42
FINANCE CHARGES: 42
PAY METHODS: 43
MAINTAINING INVENTORY ACCOUNT IN THE SOFTWARE 43
AN ILLUSTRATION OF MAINTAING INVENTORY ACCOUNT IN THE SOFTWARE: 46
ENTERING BEGINNING BALANCES OF INVENTORY 49
HOW TO MAKE A PURCHASE ORDER 52
HOW TO RECORD RECEIVING OF INVENTORY 55
RECEIVING INVENTORY WITHOUT ISSUING PURCHASE ORDER: 58
RECEIVING SOME INVENTORY AFTER ISSUING & WITHOUT ISSUING PURCHASE ORDER: 60
HOW TO MAKE A QUOTATION IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 63
HOW TO MAKE A SALE ORER IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 65
HOW TO MAKE A SALE INVOICE IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE 70
HOW TO RECEIVE THE CASH IN THE SOFTWARE 70
HOW TO RECORD SALES RETURN IN THE SOFTWARE 72
HOW TO RECORD SALES RETURN IN THE SOFTWARE 76
HOW TO RECORD A JOURNAL ENTRY IN PEACHTREE SOFTWARE 80
HOW TO USE GLOBAL OPTION IN PEACHTREE SOFTWARE 81
HOW TO SET SECURITY CODE FOR PEACHTREE USERS 84





SET UP FOR A NEW COMPANY

Following are the steps involved in order to create a new company using Peachtree accounting software 2004:


From this screen click on “Set up a new company”. Following is a wizard screen which will be appeared on the screen by clicking on “Set up a new company”.

This wizard scheme will provide us with five options which are required to be entered in the software in order to complete our steps involved in the creation of the company. First we press the “Next” button and the following “company information” wizard scheme appears on the screen.

After filling the above shown wizard, we click the “Next” button in order to continue our steps towards the creation of our company in Peachtree accounting software 2004.

Then this wizard scheme of “Chart of Accounts” will be appeared after filling all the required information in “Company information” wizard Scheme. From this wizard of “Chart of Accounts”, we will click on “Build your own company”. Following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” will be appeared on the screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

We have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to convert a company data from another software into Peachtree software then we select the second last option which is “Convert a company from another accounting program”, the following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for the conversion of a company from another software will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to copy settings of an already existed company in Peachtree software then we select the third last option which is “Copy settings from an existing Peachtree Accounting company”, the following wizard scheme of “Accounting Method” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for Copy settings from an existing Peachtree Accounting company will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard of “chart of accounts” we first select the available company in “Available Peachtree companies” window and after this we press “View chart of accounts” and get the list of accounts for that company in the window above “View chart of accounts”. From here we select the accounts which we want to add in our new company and press the “Next” Button. After this the rest of the procedure remains the same for creation of our company.

From this new wizard scheme of “Copy Company information”, we can select different options which we require to be copied from the existing available companies in the Peachtree software. We select the options required to be copied and then press the “Next” Button in order to continue the formation of a new company. On pressing “Next” we arrive on to the following wizard scheme.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Congratulations” on implementing this procedure.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and within 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have five different options available in wizard scheme “Chart of accounts”. If we want to set up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies in Peachtree software then we select the second option from the beginning which is “Set up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies”, and click on the “Next” button and the following wizard scheme of “Chart of Accounts” appears on the screen. The remaining steps for settings up a new company using an extensive chart of accounts from one of many sample companies from an existing Peachtree Accounting company will be implemented in the same manner as implemented for “Build your own company”.

From this wizard scheme of “Chart of accounts “we can select the industry or the company related to our company. If we want to form a new store then we will be selecting “Retail Company” from the “Available chart of accounts” option. If we wish to see the list of accounts available in the retail company chart of accounts then we can do this simply by clicking on “retail company” option and then clicking on “View chart of Accounts” option. By doing this the following screen of the list of chart of accounts for a retail company will be displayed on our screen.

From this window we can scroll down and have a look on the accounts listed in the chart of accounts of the retail company. From these accounts we can add the accounts in our new company. Now we will close this window and press the “Next” button in order to get to the next wizard scheme “Accounting Method”.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This “Defaults “wizard scheme displays the default settings made by the Peachtree accounting software for our new company which we can change after creation of the company. From this we press the “Next” button and get to the following screen of “Congratulation”.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and within 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.

As we have left only with the procedure of creating a company from the first option so we are going to create a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004 using this first option of “Set up a new Retail, Service, Construction, Manufacturing, or Distribution company, using a specified chart of accounts”. From this wizard scheme of “chart of accounts”, now we select the first option which is “Set up a new Retail, service, Construction, Manufacturing or Distribution company using a simplified chart of accounts”. By using this option we will be able to get the simplified sample chart of accounts already prepared in the Peachtree software for different companies. Press the “Next” button and arrive to the following wizard scheme on the desktop screen.

In this new wizard we have the “Available Chart of accounts” for a Retail company, Service Company, Construction Company, Manufacturing Company and Distribution Company. We can select any company as per our requirements and can click on “Next” button to complete our process of creation of a company. We can also view the chart of accounts of a specific available company by clicking on that required company and then clicking on “View chart of accounts” option. By doing this we will be arriving on the following wizard scheme.

From this list of chart of accounts we can scroll down and have a look on the available accounts in that list. Now we close this list and press the “next” button after selecting our required company. We get the following screen after following this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Method”, we select “Accrual” and then click on “Next” button to continue our steps toward creation of a new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. After following this step, we get the following wizard screen of “Posting Method” on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme of “Posting Method”, we select “Real Time” option and click on “Next” button to proceed towards the creation of a new company on Peachtree Accounting Software 2004. We get the Following Screen of “Accounting Periods” on implementing this procedure.

From this wizard scheme of “Accounting Periods”, we select the option of “12 monthly accounting periods” option as per our requirement and then click on “Next” Button to proceed. After following this procedure, we reach to the following “Monthly Accounting Periods” Wizard scheme.



From this Wizard scheme of “Monthly Accounting Periods”, we select “January” as Month and “2012” as year for our requirement, “When do you want your fiscal year to start?”. Then we select “February” as month and “2012” as year for our requirement of “What is the first month you will be entering your data?”. After this we select “2012” in our requirement of “What is the first year you will be entering payroll?”. After filling this we click the “Next” button and get the following screen on our desktop screen.

This “Defaults “wizard scheme displays the default settings made by the Peachtree accounting software for our new company which we can change after creation of the company. From this we press the “Next” button and get to the following screen of “Congratulation”.

This is the last wizard scheme involved in the creation of our new company in Peachtree accounting software 2004. In this wizard, we press the “Finish “button after which a new company starts its creation and with in 10 seconds the Peachtree software creates a new company for us.



HOW TO OPEN AN EXISTING COMPANY

We can open an existing company using our Peachtree software which we had already created in the past or had been created by someone else in the past. For this the existing company must be saved in the hard drive of the computer on which the Peachtree software is installed. For this first we open the Peachtree software and arrive on the following wizard scheme on our desktop.

From this wizard scheme we select the first option “Open an existing company”. On clicking “Open an existing company”, following wizard is shown on our desktop screen.

From this wizard scheme we Press the “Browse” button on the left side of the wizard and locate our existing company folder in the hard drive. On clicking “Browse” button we arrive on the following screen.

From here we select our drive in which we have saved the files of the existing company. After selecting that drive we further locate the folder in which we have saved our files of existing company from the “Directories” portion. Drive can be selected by the following method.

After selecting the drive in which we have saved the data folder of our already existed company we finally locate the company folder and select that folder from the screen as follows and click the “Ok” button.

One thing should be kept in mind that on selecting the Company the folder sign with that company should be of closed folder rather than opened folder. The difference between both the folders has been illustrated in the following diagram.

After clicking the “Ok” button the existing company data will be restored in the software and a new screen will be opened on the desktop screen as follows.

This window is the main screen for our company which we were willing to open. At the top of the Peachtree software we will find the name of the company with which we had already created it in the past.

OR

There is another method of opening an existing company using Peachtree software. In this method we directly copy the files of the existing company which was created in the past and paste them in the companies’ directory of Peachtree Accounting Software. For this first of all we select the data folder of the already existed company which we are willing to open using Peachtree. After selecting it we Right click on it and Click on “Copy” as shown in the following screen.

After clicking on “Copy” we open the drive in which the Peachtree software is installed. Mostly this is the Drive “C” where we save our software as well as windows but it may vary Pc to Pc. On opening the Drive “C” we see the following screen on our desktop.

From this window we double click on the folder “Program Files” and get to the following screen.

From this window we open the “Peachtree” folder by double clicking on it. By doing this we arrive on the following screen on our desktop.

From this window we open the “Company” folder by double clicking on it and arrive on the following screen on our desktop.

Here we paste the folder of the existing company which we already copied in the start of the process by using a shortcut key CTRL + V or we can Right click within the window and click on Paste if we have already copied it from the original directory as we did in the start.

After pasting it in this folder we again go back to the Peachtree Software or open it again. After opening it we get the following screen on our desktop.

From this wizard scheme we select the first option “Open an existing company”. On clicking “Open an existing company”, following wizard is shown on our desktop screen.

From this we select our company which we have copied in the company folder and click the “Ok” button. On clicking “Ok” the main screen for our company which we were willing to open appears on the desktop screen. At the top of the Peachtree software we will find the name of the company with which we had already created it in the past.



ENTERING CHART OF ACCOUNTS IN THE SOFTWARE

If we have chosen the “Build your own company” in the beginning from the “Chart of accounts” wizard scheme then we will have to make our own chart of accounts after the formation of the company is completed. For this first we open the company in which we want to enter the chart of the accounts. The first page of the company will be opened in the same manner as described above. Following front page of the company appears on the desktop screen on opening the window.

From this screen we first select the “Maintain” option from the above taskbar and by clicking on the “Maintain” option, following options further appears on the screen.

From these options we select the “Chart of accounts” option in order to enter the chart of accounts in the software. On clicking on “Chart of accounts”, following screen appears on the desktop screen.

This is the window where we enter the accounts related to our company or store whatever is our concern. It contains “Account ID” option in which we enter the Code of the account or the ID of the account. Another option is “Description” in which we add the name of the account. Like Petty cash, cash in hand, cash at bank, account receivable, account payable and so on. The third option is “Account type”. From this option we can select the type or the nature of the account which we are adding in the list of chart of accounts. For instance the type of account for petty cash and cash at bank will be “Cash”, the type of account for account receivable will be “Account receivable” and so on. There is another option of “Inactive”. By selecting this option our account will be inactivated and we will not be able to record any financial entry regarding that account. That account will be closed for recording the transactions and marinating the records. The next option is “Change ID”, from where we can change the ID of the account if we have entered it incorrectly. We can even delete the account using this window. All these are explained in the further pages. We enter the Code of the account in the “Account ID” as follows.

Below this “Account ID” option there is another option “Description”. We enter the name of the account in this portion as illustrated follows.

After this we select the “Account type” by clicking on it. On clicking it, different options for the account type appears on the desktop screen from which we select the appropriate account type for our account. Following options appear on the screen on clicking “Account type”.

If we have made any mistake in our chart of accounts with any of our account then we can also rectify our mistake. If we had written wrong description or ID for the account or selected the wrong account type for the account then these mistakes can be rectified by using the following procedure.

If we want to change the ID of our account then we need to first select that account from the list and after selecting it we press the button of “Change ID” in the top of the “Maintain chart of accounts” wizard scheme. On doing this, following screen appears on the desktop screen.

Here we enter our new correct ID for the account in “Enter New Account ID” and click on “ok”. After this the ID of the account will be changed to our new entered ID. If we want to change the description or the account type of any account then we can also do it. First we will have to select that particular account which requires to be amended and the click on description and change the description or account type click on account type and change the account type to our required account type. After changing the description or account type press the save button which have been shown below.

We can also inactive any account. On inactivating the account that account will be inactivated and we will be not is allowed to use that account later in the future transactions. To inactivate any account we must select that account from the list and then click on the inactive box as shown below.



ENTERING THE BEGINNING BALANCES OF THE ACCOUNTS IN CHART OF ACCOUNTS

Now we have to enter the opening balances in the accounts. We click on “Beginning Balances” button in order to enter our beginning balances. The button of “Beginning balances” has been shown below in the wizard scheme.

From this we press the “Beginning balances” button and on clicking it, following window appears on the desktop screen.

If we have to enter the balance for the month of February then we will have to enter the data in January month. Same if the balance of March is required to be entered as beginning balance then we will enter the beginning balance in the month of February. The amounts or balance entered will be the closing balance of February which will become the opening balance of March. One more thing which is very important is that the first digit in the date is of MONTH not DAY as it’s American software where MONTH is written before DAY in date.

On selecting the period we click on the “Ok” button and the following screen appears on the desktop screen.

Here we enter the balances in the account. The left side is for the Assets and Expenses while the right side is for Liabilities, equity and Income. We enter the opening balances of our respective accounts. The amounts or the balances will only be entered in the white portion which is for the NORMAL BALANCE for that respective account. It means if we have selected Assets as the type of account for Cash the Assets portion which is the left side will become white and eligible for balance entry. We must enter the data in such a manner that the left side and right side of the trial balance is equal to each other because e the arithmetical accuracy of the data is proved by the equal balance of trial balance.



HOW TO CREATE CUSTOMER RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE

After opening the company in our Peachtree accounting software, the first thing we do in order to create the customer record is that we Click on “maintain” option at the top of the software’s toolbar and on clicking it, following window appears on our desktop screen.

From this window we select the first option which is “Customers/Prospectus….” In order to create our customer records. On clicking it following window scheme appears on the screen.

We fill this window for each of our client or customer. Every customer will be allocated with a separate and unique ID which will be written in “Customer ID” portion. This ID cannot be repeated for any other customer. Every customer will have a unique and different ID as we allocated different ID for different accounts while preparing chart of Accounts in the beginning. After this we write the name of the organization with which we are dealing in the “Name” portion in this window. After writing the name of the organization we first fill the “General” part of the requirements. We enter the name of that person or the post of that person as per the conditions with whom we are going to engage in. This can be sales representative, salesman, Sales manager or any other person as per the requirements. After this we enter the address of that customer in the “Address” portion. Only 30 alphabets or numbers can be written in a single line in “Address” option. If the address is longer than 30 alphabets then we can write the remaining address in the 2nd line for address. Then we write the city and so on. In “Customer Type” we mention which type of customer is he/she is according to our categorizations. This Customer account is a subsidiary ledger account which will be entered in sales revenue account. After filling the other required information in “General’ we move onwards on to Sales Defaults by clicking on it. Customer ID, Name and GL Sales acct must be entered in order to create the record for any customer.

Here we enter all the required information. In the “GL Sales Acct” portion we write the ID of our sales revenue account. If we do write any ID which doesn’t exist in the chat of accounts then the blank area in “GL Sales Acct” start blinking. After filling this information we move on to the “Payment Defaults” by clicking on it.

Here we enter all the required information regarding the payment to the client. After filling this portion we move forward to Custom Fields by clicking on it.

Here we enter the Second contact if required, Reference if required and so. These Field labels can be changed easily on the customer default window. After completing this “Custom Fields” we move forward to “History” by clicking on it.

This is the last window before completion of a single customer record. After filling these all required information, we click on “Save” button in order to save the record which we have entered in the software for that specific customer. After this we can again repeat our whole process in order to create more records for different customers. Following is the Save Button.

Z:\COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING\save.bmp



HOW TO CREATE VENDOR RECORDS IN PEACHTREE ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE

After opening the company in our Peachtree accounting software, the first thing we do in order to create the vendor record is that we Click on “maintain” opt

Accounting homework help

Identifier Edition Statement Place of Publication Date of Publication Publisher Title Author Contributors Corporate Author Corporate Contributors Former owner Engraver Issuance type Flickr URL Shelfmarks
206 London 1879 [1878] S. Tinsley & Co. Walter Forbes. [A novel.] By A. A A. A. FORBES, Walter. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000206 British Library HMNTS 12641.b.30.
216 London; Virtue & Yorston 1868 Virtue & Co. All for Greed. [A novel. The dedication signed: A. A. A., i.e. Marie Pauline Rose, Baroness Blaze de Bury.] A., A. A. BLAZE DE BURY, Marie Pauline Rose – Baroness monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000216 British Library HMNTS 12626.cc.2.
218 London 1869 Bradbury, Evans & Co. Love the Avenger. By the author of “All for Greed.” [The dedication signed: A. A. A., i.e. Marie Pauline Rose, Baroness Blaze de Bury.] A., A. A. BLAZE DE BURY, Marie Pauline Rose – Baroness monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000218 British Library HMNTS 12625.dd.1.
472 London 1851 James Darling Welsh Sketches, chiefly ecclesiastical, to the close of the twelfth century. By the author of “Proposals for Christian Union” (E. S. A. [i.e. Ernest Appleyard]) A., E. S. Appleyard, Ernest Silvanus. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000472 British Library HMNTS 10369.bbb.15.
480 A new edition, revised, etc. London 1857 Wertheim & Macintosh [The World in which I live, and my place in it. By E. S. A. [i.e. Letitia Willgoss Stone.] Edited by … J. H. Broome.] A., E. S. BROOME, John Henry. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000480 British Library HMNTS 9007.d.28.
481 Fourth edition, revised, etc. London 1875 William Macintosh [The World in which I live, and my place in it. By E. S. A. [i.e. Letitia Willgoss Stone.] Edited by … J. H. Broome.] A., E. S. BROOME, John Henry. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000481 British Library HMNTS 9006.ee.10.
519 London 1872 The Author Lagonells. By the author of Darmayne (F. E. A. [i.e. Florence Emily Ashley]) A., F. E. ASHLEY, Florence Emily. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000519 British Library HMNTS 12637.e.3.
667 pp. 40. G. Bryan & Co: Oxford, 1898 The Coming of Spring, and other poems. By J. A. [i.e. J. Andrews.] A., J.|A., J. ANDREWS, J. – Writer of Verse monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000667 British Library HMNTS 011652.g.73.
874 London] 1676 A Warning to the inhabitants of England, and London in particular … By M. A. [i.e. Mary Adams.] Remaʿ. ADAMS, Mary. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000000874 British Library HMNTS 11645.bb.42.
1143 London 1679 A Satyr against Vertue. (A poem: supposed to be spoken by a Town-Hector. [By John Oldham. The preface signed: T. A.]) A., T. OLDHAM, John. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000001143 British Library HMNTS 11602.ee.10.(2.)
1280 Coventry 1802 Printed by J. Turner An Account of the many and great Loans, Benefactions and Charities, belonging to the City of Coventry … A new edition. [The dedication signed: AB, CD, EF, GH, &c. By Edward Jackson and Samuel Carte.] CARTE, Samuel.|JACKSON, Edward – Rector of Southam, and CARTE (Samuel) monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000001280 British Library HMNTS 1430.g.17.
1808 Christiania 1859 Erindringer som Bidrag til Norges Historie fra 1800-1815. Anden Udgave … Udgivet med nogle Rettelser og Tillæg af Christian C. A. Lange. Med Forfatterens Portraet, og hans Biographi af Amtmand J. C. Aall AALL, Jacob. AALL, J. C.|LANGE, Christian Christoph Andreas. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000001808 British Library HMNTS 9425.cc.37.
1905 Firenze 1888 Gli Studi storici in terra d’Otranto … Frammenti estratti in gran parte dall’ Archivio Storico Italiano … a cura e spese di L(uigi) G(iuseppe) D(e) S(imone) AAR, Ermanno – pseud. [i.e. Luigi Giuseppe Oronzo Mariano Raffaele Francesco Fortunato Felice de Simone.] S., L. G. D.|SIMONE, Luigi Giuseppe Oronzo Mariano Raffaele Francesco Fortunato Felice de. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000001905 British Library HMNTS 10136.g.22.
1929 Amsterdam 1839, 38-54 De Aardbol. Magazijn van hedendaagsche land- en volkenkunde … Met platen en kaarten. [Deel 4-9 by P. H. W.] WITKAMP, Pieter Harme. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000001929 British Library HMNTS 10002.g.16-19.
2836 Savona 1897 Cronache Savonesi dal 1500 al 1570 … Accresciute di documenti inediti pubblicate e annotate dal dott. G. Assereto ABATE, Giovanni Agostino. ASSERETO, Giovanni. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000002836 British Library HMNTS 10136.h.24.
2854 London 1865 E. Moxon & Co. See-Saw; a novel … Edited [or rather, written] by W. W. Reade ABATI, Francesco. READE, William Winwood. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000002854 British Library HMNTS 12623.bbb.12.
2956 Paris 1860-63 Géodésie d’une partie de la Haute Éthiopie, revue et rédigée par R. Radau. fasc. 1-3 ABBADIE, Antoine Thompson d’. RADAU, Rodolphe. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000002956 British Library HMNTS 10096.i.19.
2957 Paris 1873 [With eleven maps.] ABBADIE, Antoine Thompson d’. RADAU, Rodolphe. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000002957 British Library HMNTS 10095.i.13.
3017 Nueva edicion, anotada … y continuada … por J. J. de Acosta y Calbo. Puerto-Rico 1866 [Historia geográfica, civil y politica de la Isla de S. Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico, Dala a luz A. Valladares de Sotomayor.] ABBAD Y LASIERRA, Agustín Íñigo – Bishop of Barbastro ACOSTA Y CALBO, José Julian de. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000003017 British Library HMNTS 10480.h.18.
3131 New York 1899 W. Abbatt The Crisis of the Revolution, being the story of Arnold and André now for the first time collected from all sources, and illustrated with views of all places identified with it … Illustrations from original photographs by E. S. Bennett, etc ABBATT, William. ANDRÉ, John – Major|ARNOLD, Benedict. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000003131 British Library HMNTS 9603.g.14.
4598 Hull 1814 The Author Peace: a lyric poem. [With prefatory address by F. Wrangham?] ABBOTT, Thomas Eastoe. WRANGHAM, Francis. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000004598 British Library HMNTS 11641.f.1.
4884 London 1820 J. Hatchard & Son Abdallah; or, The Arabian Martyr: a Christian drama, in three acts. [In verse.] [By Thomas Foster Barham, the Elder.] BARHAM, Thomas Foster – the Elder monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000004884 British Library HMNTS 994.l.1.(7.)
4976 [Another edition.] Abdollatiphi historiæ Ægypti compendium … Partim ipse vertit, partim a Pocockio versum edendum curavit, notisque illustravit J. White. Arab. & Lat. Oxonii 1800 J. Cooke, etc. [Abdollatiphi Historiæ Ægypti compendium. [With a Latin version by Edward Pocock the younger.] Arab. & Lat.] WHITE, Joseph – Canon of Christ Church monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000004976 British Library HMNTS 983.e.6.|British Library HMNTS 148.d.4.|British Library HMNTS G.15137.
5382 London 1847, 48 [1846-48] Punch Office The Comic History of England … With … coloured etchings, and … woodcuts, by John Leech A’BECKETT, Gilbert Abbott. LEECH, John – Artist monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000005382 British Library HMNTS C.131.d.16.|British Library HMNTS 9505.d.3.
5385 [Another edition.] Illustrated by John Leech. London [1897?] Bradbury, Agnew & Co. [The comic history of England … With twenty coloured etchings, and two hundred woodcuts. By John Leech.] A’BECKETT, Gilbert Abbott. LEECH, John – Artist monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000005385 British Library HMNTS 9503.f.4.
5389 [Another edition.] London [1897?] Bradbury, Agnew & Co. [The Comic History of Rome … Illustrated by John Leech.] A’BECKETT, Gilbert Abbott. LEECH, John – Artist monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000005389 British Library HMNTS 9039.i.11.
5432 Milano 1893 Signa: opera in tre atti [founded on the novel entitled: “Signa” by Ouida] … Traduzione ritmica di G. Mazzucato A’BECKETT, Gilbert Arthur – and RUDALL (H. A.) MAZZUCATO, Giovanni Andrea.|RUDALL, H. A.|Ouida monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000005432 British Library HMNTS 11779.g.8.(10.)
6036 London 1805 C. & R. Baldwin The Venetian Outlaw, a drama in three acts … Translated [from the French translation of J. H. D. Zschokke’s “Abällino, oder der grosse Bandit”] and adapted to the English stage by R. W. Elliston ELLISTON, Robert William. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000006036 British Library HMNTS 642.i.25.|British Library HMNTS 164.g.68.
6821 Aberdeen 1837 J. Davidson & Co. Description of the Coast between Aberdeen and Leith. [By William Duncan.]: Appendix DUNCAN, William – Clerk of Police, Aberdeen monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000006821 British Library HMNTS 797.d.2.
7521 Wien 1896 Aus Kaukasischen Ländern. Reisebriefe von H. Abich. Herausgegeben von dessen Witwe (A. Abich) ABICH, Wilhelm Hermann. ABICH, Adelaïde. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000007521 British Library HMNTS 10077.h.21.
7630 Abingdon 1898 W. H. Hooke Selections from the Municipal Chronicles of the Borough of Abingdon from A.D. 1555 to A.D. 1897. Edited by B. Challenor CHALLENOR, Bromley. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000007630 British Library HMNTS 10352.dd.26.
8239 Quebec 1899 L. J. Demers & Frère The Plains of Abraham, 1759, a spot sacred to the memory of Wolfe and Montcalm. An appeal to all Canada for the preservation of the Plains of Abraham as portion of the public domain BROTANEK, Rudolf. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000008239 British Library HMNTS 10470.ff.20.
8435 London 1892 Effingham Wilson & Co. The Witwatersrand Gold Mines. A true and unvarnished account of their origin and progress … Translated … by H. C. Simonsen ABRAHAM, Félix – Writer on Mining SIMONSEN, H. C. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000008435 British Library HMNTS 7106.b.46.
8440 London 1894 Effingham Wilson The New Era of the Goldmining Industry in the Witwatersrand … Translated from the German by H. C. Simonsen. With an authentic map of the fields ABRAHAM, Félix – Writer on Mining SIMONSEN, H. C. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000008440 British Library HMNTS 07108.g.6.
11361 Leipzig [1894-96 Tirol und Vorarlberg … Mit … einer Karte, zahlreichen Illustrationen, etc ACHLEITNER, Arthur – and UBL (E.) UBL, E. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000011361 British Library HMNTS 10201.g.13.
11852 pp. 40. W. Cann: Plymouth, [1876?] A Question of Holy Writ, suggested by a lecture on Buddha and Buddhism, delivered before the Literary Society of Exeter, by Lieut. Ackland, R.N., and answered in the following lines, etc. [By Joseph Plimsoll.]: Bible. Appendix. Miscellaneous ACKLAND – Lieut., R.N PLIMSOLL, Joseph. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000011852 British Library HMNTS 011650.k.89.(4.)
13074 London 1899 W. Thacker & Co. A Summer in High Asia: being a record of sport and travel in Baltistan and Ladakh … With an appendix on Central Asian trade by Capt. S. H. Godfrey … Illustrated from drawings by the author, photographs, and a map of the route ADAIR, Frederick Edward Shafto. GODFREY, Stuart Hill. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000013074 British Library HMNTS 10077.d.27.|British Library OC V 3030
13364 London [1885] Griffith, Farran & Co. A Hand-book and History of Sidmouth from the Triassic period up to “Now.” By אדם [Adam, i.e. P. O. Hutchinson]. Illustrated … With map HUTCHINSON, Peter Orlando. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000013364 British Library HMNTS 10358.g.35.(4.)|British Library HMNTS 10352.d.32.
14466 London [1860?] Adams & King The Historie of Eald Street, now called Old Street, with memoranda of the Parish of St. Luke and of the Chartreuse KING – Printer, of Goswell Street monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000014466 British Library HMNTS 10352.i.24.
14703 1845 1846 First (-Third) Annual Report on the Geology of the State of Vermont ADAMS, Charles Baker. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000014703 British Library HMNTS 1254.h.9.
15141 London 1893 T. Fisher Unwin The New Egypt. A social sketch. [Edited by J. W. Longsdon.] ADAMS, Francis William Lauderdale. LONGSDON, J. W. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000015141 British Library HMNTS 010096.e.61.
15146 London 1894 T. Fisher Unwin Tiberius: a drama … With introduction by W. M. Rossetti ADAMS, Francis William Lauderdale. ROSSETTI, William Michael. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000015146 British Library HMNTS 11781.gg.4.
16173 enk 1817 printed by W. Thorne, and published by J. Callow; J. Hunter; and J. Ridgway Memoirs of the Life and Doctrines of the late John Hunter, Esq., etc ADAMS, Joseph – M.D., F.L.S HUNTER, John – F.R.S monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000016173 British Library HMNTS 982.c.27.|British Library HMNTS RB.23.b.4745.
16543 London 1816 John Murray The Narrative of Robert Adams, a sailor, who was wrecked on the Western Coast of Africa, in the year 1810 … With a map, etc. [Edited by S. Cock.] Adams, Robert – Sailor COCK, Simon. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000016543 British Library HMNTS 983.e.7.|British Library HMNTS 147.e.3.|British Library HMNTS G.2842.
16544 [Another edition.] Boston 1817 Wells & Lilley [The Narrative of Robert Adams, a sailor, who was wrecked on the Western Coast of Africa, in the year 1810 … With a map, etc. [Edited by S. Cock.]] ADAMS, Robert – Sailor COCK, Simon. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000016544 British Library HMNTS 789.bb.21.
17602 London 1897 J. Bowden East End Idylls … With an introduction by the Hon. and Rev. J. G. Adderley Adcock, Arthur St. John ADDERLEY, James Granville – Hon monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000017602 British Library HMNTS 012625.i.5.
17752 Upsaliæ [1833] Acta historiam regis Chistierni II. illustrantia. Quae … præside mag. Erico Gust. Geijer … pro gradu philosophico p.p. P. A. Adde, etc ADDE, Petrus Adolphus. GEIJER, Erik Gustaf. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000017752 British Library HMNTS 9425.bb.13.
18173 [Another edition.] With a complete index. [With a portrait engraved by Hopewood.] London 1804 Vernor & Hood [The Works of the late Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Esq. … The third edition, etc. [Edited by Thomas Tickell.]]: Works ADDISON, Joseph – Right Hon TICKELL, Thomas. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000018173 British Library HMNTS 12269.d.7.
18218 Edinburgh 1859 James Nichol The Poetical Works of Joseph Addison; Gay’s Fables; and Somerville’s Chase. With memoirs and critical dissertations by Rev. George Gilfillan: Two or more Works Addison, Joseph Gilfillan, George monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000018218 British Library HMNTS 11603.f.1.
18347 Yverdon 1777 L’Esprit d’Addisson, ou les Beautés du Spectateur, du Babillard et du Gardien, consistant principalement dans une collection des feuilles de Mr. Addisson, avec un précis de sa vie. Ouvrage nouvellement traduit de l’anglais par Mr. J. P. A: Essays from the Spectator, Guardian and Tatler ADDISON, Joseph – Right Hon A., J. P. – Mr monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000018347 British Library HMNTS 12270.pp.15.
18469 Londini 1799 F. & C. Rivington Addisoni Epistola missa ex Italiâ ad illustrem Dominum Halifax, anno 1701. [A translation into Latin hexameter verse.] Auctore A. Murphy. (Addison’s Letter to Lord Halifax.) Lat. & Eng: Miscellaneous Single Works ADDISON, Joseph – Right Hon MURPHY, Arthur. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000018469 British Library HMNTS 11647.f.44.(2.)
19340 St. Petersburg 1827 Augustin Freiherr von Meyerberg und seine Reise nach Russland. Nebst einer von ihm auf diese Reise veranstalteten Sammlung von Ansichten, Gebräuchen, Bildnissen u. s. w ADELUNG, Friedrich von. MAYER, Augustin – Baron von Mayerberg monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000019340 British Library HMNTS 10291.e.1.
20207 Berlin 1866 Studien zur Cultur-Geschichte Polens. Bd. 1 ADLER, Carl – Writer on Poland Długosz, Jan. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000020207 British Library HMNTS 9475.bbb.21.
20960 London 1853 Addey & Co. The Diary and Houres of the Ladye Adolie, a faythfulle childe. 1552. [Edited, or rather written, by Lady C. M. Pepys.] PEPYS, Charlotte Maria – Lady monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000020960 British Library HMNTS 12620.d.7.
21119 London 1874 Chapman & Hall Lays of Modern Oxford, by Adon. Illustrated by M. E. Edwards, F. Lockwood, and the author EDWARDS, Mary Ellen.|LOCKWOOD, Frank – Sir monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000021119 British Library HMNTS 11650.g.9.
21430 London 1790 J. Johnson Adriano; or, the first of June, a poem. By the author of The Village Curate [i.e. James Hurdis] Hurdis, James monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000021430 British Library HMNTS 11632.d.48.(2.)|British Library HMNTS 992.k.27.(3.)|British Library HMNTS 1508/379.(2.)
21782 London [1817.] J. Johnston The Adventures of a Post Captain. By a Naval Officer. [In verse.] With … engravings, by Mr. Williams WILLIAMS, Samuel – Wood Engraver monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000021782 British Library HMNTS 11642.g.19.
22060 Sceaux 1883 Histoire de la Ville de Sceaux depuis son origine jusqu’à nos jours … Sous la direction de … M. Charaire … Ouvrage illustré de gravures, etc ADVIELLE, Victor. CHARAIRE, Michel. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000022060 British Library HMNTS 10169.k.5.
22105 London 1795 J. Debrett The National Advocates, a poem. Affectionately inscribed to the Honourable Thomas Erskine and Vicary Gibbs, Esquire [in praise of their exertions in defence of Thomas Hardy, Horne Tooke and others]. [By William Hayley.] GIBBS, Vicary – Sir monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000022105 British Library HMNTS 644.k.24.(5.)|British Library HMNTS 11641.h.11.(7.)
22278 Coblenz 1865 Das Hochgebirge von Grindelwald. Naturbilder aus der schweizerischen Alpenwelt von C. Aeby und E. v. Fellenberg … und Gerwer. Mit … einer Karte in Farbendruck von R. Leuzinger AEBY, Christoph. FELLENBERG, Edmund von.|GERWER, Rud. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000022278 British Library HMNTS 10196.f.21.
23565 London 1877 Chatto & Windus Prometheus the Fire-giver. An attempted restoration of the lost first part of the Prometheian Trilogy of Æschylus. [By William Cox Bennett.]: Appendix Aeschylus. BENNETT, William Cox. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000023565 British Library HMNTS 11652.c.8.
24344 Leipzig 1853 Cosmographiam Æthici Istrici ab Hieronymo ex Graeco in Latinum breviarium redactam … separato libello expressam primum edidit Henricus Wuttke. Accedunt duae tabulae, etc WUTTKE, Heinrich. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000024344 British Library HMNTS 10006.d.7.(1.)
24878 London 1886, [1885] Hodder & Stoughton The Children of Africa. Written for all English-speaking children. By … the author of “The Children of India,” etc. [i.e. A. W. Marston] MARSTON, Annie Wright. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000024878 British Library HMNTS 10095.e.1.
27797 London [1834] William W. Clowes Prospectus of an Expedition into the Interior of South Africa from Dalagoa Bay, etc. [By W. D. Cooley.]: General Appendix COOLEY, William Desborough. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000027797 British Library HMNTS 010096.h.36.
28615 Carlstad, Stockholm 1852-63 Försök till en statsekonomisk statistik öfver Sverige. (Den statsekonomiska afdelningen af C. A. Agardh, den statistiska af C. E. Ljungberg.) Agardh, C. A. (Carl Adolf) LJUNGBERG, Carl Edvard. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000028615 British Library HMNTS 10281.e.6.
28630 Carlstad 1857 Inledning till Sveriges fysiska geografi. Jemte upplysningar rörande ankologisk och fysisk karta öfver Sverige Agardh, C. A. (Carl Adolf) DAHLMAN, Carl Edvard. monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000028630 British Library HMNTS 10280.ee.3.
28758 Boston 1866, 76 Ticknor & Fields; J. R. Osgood Geological Sketches. [The preface signed: E. C. A., i.e. Elizabeth C. Agassiz. With a portrait.] Agassiz, Louis A., E. C.|Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary monographic http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/tags/sysnum000028758 British Library HMNTS 7108.aa.5.
28784 Paris 1869 Voyage au Brésil, traduit de l’anglais … par F. Vogeli. Ouvrage illustré, etc Agassiz, Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary|VOGELI, Félix. monographic http://www

Accounting homework help


Business Analytics


Introduction:

In this coursework report, the detailed analysis of sales data is performed through IBM SPSS Statistics Software. Sales data analysis is the procedure of gaining insights from sales data, their tendencies, and metrics to analyse sales performance of products. Sales analysis provides information about trends in sales performance, potential opportunities, top-performing sales products, increased sales activities and distribution trends. A product sales analysis assists in identifying top-selling products and under-performing variants, as well as comparing product sales of different products and their variants. It also demonstrates the features of a product which stimulate the interest of buyers and how anyone may use them to promote purchasing intentions. This report analyzes the sales data of a year with their weekly unit prices and weekly distribution. This report includes the visual representation of volumes of sales data for all variants; for the visual representation, the sales trajectories of all variants are illustrated. The summary statistics of all 13 variants is also demonstrated to compare the sales of each variant in 52 weeks. The top-selling variants are also identified based on their average sales. The relationship between the various prices of all variants is identified through correlation analysis. The closely related variants are determined on the basis of their correlation analysis. The methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity are also proposed in this report. The Exploratory Factor analysis is conducted for weekly distribution of all variants and the multivariate regression analysis is performed to identify which prices have direct influence on the sales of 2nd Variant. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 is used for designing line charts, analysing summary statistics, correlation analysis, multilevel regression analysis and exploratory factor analysis. The analysis is presented through graphs and tables for the better understanding of the data.


Question no 1 – Part a:


Visual Representation of Volume of Sales for all Variants

The visual representation of volume of sales and sale trajectories of all variants was designed separately through line charts in SPSS. These sale trajectories presented on line charts are demonstrated as follows:


Sales Trajectory of Variants

Sales trajectory of variant 1 is represented in Graph 1.

Graph 1: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 1

Graph 1 represents that sale trajectory of variant 1 was high on 4th, 5th and 44th week while the sales volume was lowest in 15th week. The sales volume decreased after the 44th week to the end of the year. These finding of graph presents the effective performance of variant 1.

Sales trajectory of variant 2 is represented in Graph 2.

Graph 2: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 2

Graph 2 represents that sale trajectory of variant 2 was high on only 2nd week while the sales volume was lowest in 20th week. After the 20th week, the sales of variant 2 increased based on several weeks which represent the suitable performance of variant 2.

Sales trajectory of variant 3 is represented in Graph 3.

Graph 3: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 3

Graph 3 represents that sale trajectory of variant 3 was high on only 40th week while the sales volume was lowest in 24th week. The sales trajectory was reduced after the 5th week and till the 24th week and the after the increase at the 40th week, the sales again reduced. These findings of graph 3 represent the normal performance of variant 3.

Sales trajectory of variant 4 is represented in Graph 4.

Graph 4: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 4

Graph 4 represents that sale trajectory of variant 4 was high on only 5th week while the sales volume was lowest in 51st week. The sales of variant 4 reduced week after week; therefore the performance of variant 4 is poor.

Sales trajectory of variant 5 is represented in Graph 5.

Graph 5: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 5

Graph 5 represents that sale trajectory of variant 5 was high on only 1st week while the sales volume declined week after week, which represents the under-performance of variant 5.

Sales trajectory of variant 6 is represented in Graph 6.

Graph 6: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 6

Graph 6 represents that sale trajectory of variant 6 was high on 45 week while the sales volume was lowest in 40 week. The sales trajectory of variant 6 increased from the initial week and then reduced after the 25th week till 40th week and again increased. These patterns of sales trajectory of variant 6 represent its satisfactory performance.

Sales trajectory of variant 7 is represented in Graph 7.

Graph 7: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 7

Graph 7 represents the high sales in the initial weeks which then reduced till the 25th week and again increased followed by the reduction in sales. The sales of variant 7 in the last week of the year were similar to the sales in the first week. These findings represent the significant performance of variant 7.

Sales trajectory of variant 8 is represented in Graph 8.

Graph 8: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 8

Graph 8 represents that sale trajectory of variant 8 was high on only 35th week while the sales volume declined week after week which indicated the under-performance of variant 8.

Sales trajectory of variant 9 is represented in Graph 9.

Graph 9: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 9

Graph 9 represents that sale trajectory of variant 9 is struggled to maintain the stable position. The sales of variant 9 were highest at the 26th week and the sales decline and increased week after week which indicates the good performance of variant 9.

Sales trajectory of variant 10 is represented in Graph 10.

Graph 10: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 10

Graph 10 also represents the struggling sale trajectory of variant 10. The sales of variant 10 were high on 27th week and the struggling pattern of the sales demonstrating increase and decrease in sales week after week represents the good performance of variant 10.

Sales trajectory of variant 11 is represented in Graph 11.

Graph 11: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 11

Graph 11 represents that sales trajectory of variant 11 was lowest in the initial weeks while the sales were highest at the 34th to 35th week and again the sales declined which represents the poor performance of variant 11.

Sales trajectory of variant 12 is represented in Graph 12.

Graph 12: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 12

Graph 12 represent that the sales of variant 12 declined from the initial years to the lowest sales in the last week of the year. These findings of graph 12 present the poor performance of variant 12.

Sales trajectory of variant 13 is represented in Graph 13.

Graph 13: Line Chart of Sales Trajectory of Variant 13

Graph 13 represents that the sales of variant 13 reduced in the 10th week from the initial years and the sales were highest at the 30th week which again declined followed by increase in sales. These findings present the normal performance of variant 13.


Summary Statistics of all Variants

The summary statistics of all 13 variants were analysed through SPSS and are presented in Table 1:

Table 1: Summary Statistics of Variants

Mean

Median

Std. Deviation

Minimum

Maximum

Sales_Variant_1

340863.05

342122.60

33099.908

276408

407164

Sales_Variant_2

128618.41

127768.57

38715.088

63859

218480

Sales_Variant_3

52650.48

53637.83

26089.365

9855

109834

Sales_Variant_4

3168.35

1626.15

3529.989

49

11955

Sales_Variant_5

7851.72

1624.13

13588.322

16

57485

Sales_Variant_6

25254.77

22075.54

15938.630

948

68557

Sales_Variant_7

38559.44

39037.25

12353.866

11131

71377

Sales_Variant_8

1133.64

.00

1686.843

0

5200

Sales_Variant_9

212244.64

205227.52

28441.114

160775

285225

Sales_Variant_10

183583.33

178993.56

27352.637

132821

252682

Sales_Variant_11

21799.41

21137.08

6113.736

14403

43193

Sales_Variant_12

6044.75

8028.62

3533.977

205

10780

Sales_Variant_13

817.16

802.38

152.083

554

1315

Valid N (listwise)

Table 1 represents that the Variant 1 of weekly sales volume has the highest mean of 340863.05 followed by Variant 9 with mean 212244.64 while Variant 13 has the lowest mean value of 817.16. Table 1 demonstrates that Variant 1 has highest weekly sales from the remaining variants, the average sales of variant 9 are 212244.64 and variant 10 has average sales of 183583.33 while Variant 13 has lowest sales with mean value of 817.16 followed by variant 8 with mean of 1133.64. The median value of variant 8 is zero which indicates its reduced sales in a year. The standard deviation of all variants represents the dispersion of the sales and the variants with high standard deviation to their mean values has high dispersion while the low standard deviation values with mean indicate the low dispersion of sales data.

The minimum weekly sales of variant 1 are 276408 while the maximum sales are 407164 while the minimum weekly sales of variant 4 is 49, variant 5 is 16, variant 12 is 205 and variant 13 has minimum sales of 554 while the minimum sales of variant 8 is 0. These findings represents that variant 1 and variant 9 has highest weekly sales while variant 13 and variant 8 has lowest weekly sales in a year.


Part (b)


Top Four Selling Variants:

The top four selling variants from all thirteen variants are following:

· Variant 1

· Variant 9

· Variant 10

· Variant 2

The top 4 selling variants are presented in Figure 1 in a pie chart.

Figure 1: Top four Selling Variables

Figure 1 represents that these Variants has high sales based on their mean and maximum sales values. The average sales volume of variant 1 is 340863.05, variant 10 is 128618.41, variant 9 is 212244.64 and variant 2 is 183583.33. The maximum sales volume value of Variant 1 is 407164, Variant 9 has maximum sales value of 285225, and Variant 10 has maximum sales volume value of 252682, while Variant 2 has maximum sales value of 21848.


Question no 2:


Part (a)


Correlation Analysis

Correlation analysis determines the correlation between the different variables. The analysis also measures the strength of the correlation between variables. The correlation is significant at the level of 0.01 or less than 0.01 and less than 0.05. The correlation analysis was conducted for determining the relationship between the various prices. The correlation analysis is presented in Table 2:

Table 2: Correlation Analysis of Various Prices

Correlations

Prices Variant 1

Prices Variant2

Prices Variant3

Prices Variant 4

Prices Variant 5

Prices Variant 6

Prices Variant 7

Priced Variant 8

Prices Variant 9

Prices Variant 10

Prices Variant 11

Prices Variant 12

Prices Variant 13

Prices

Variant1

Pearson Correlation

1

.263

.185

-.187

-.155

.314*

-.001

-.192

.560**

.518**

.145

.089

.546**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.059

.189

.185

.272

.023

.992

.173

.000

.000

.305

.530

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices

Variant2

Pearson Correlation

.263

1

.314*

.154

-.084

.282*

.336*

-.478**

-.046

.103

.478**

.419**

.463**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.059

.023

.277

.552

.043

.015

.000

.744

.469

.000

.002

.001

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant3

Pearson Correlation

.185

.314*

1

-.254

-.003

.660**

.590**

-.694**

-.005

.128

.690**

.533**

.128

Sig. (2-tailed)

.189

.023

.069

.981

.000

.000

.000

.970

.365

.000

.000

.364

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant4

Pearson Correlation

-.187

.154

-.254

1

.046

-.221

-.238

.260

-.046

-.012

-.197

-.020

-.144

Sig. (2-tailed)

.185

.277

.069

.748

.115

.089

.063

.746

.931

.161

.887

.307

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices

Variant5

Pearson Correlation

-.155

-.084

-.003

.046

1

-.022

-.057

-.029

-.320*

-.441**

.035

.327*

-.089

Sig. (2-tailed)

.272

.552

.981

.748

.874

.686

.840

.021

.001

.805

.018

.533

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant6

Pearson Correlation

.314*

.282*

.660**

-.221

-.022

1

.670**

-.610**

.208

.383**

.577**

.461**

.142

Sig. (2-tailed)

.023

.043

.000

.115

.874

.000

.000

.138

.005

.000

.001

.315

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant7

Pearson Correlation

-.001

.336*

.590**

-.238

-.057

.670**

1

-.699**

-.095

.101

.660**

.533**

.091

Sig. (2-tailed)

.992

.015

.000

.089

.686

.000

.000

.504

.478

.000

.000

.522

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant8

Pearson Correlation

-.192

-.478**

-.694**

.260

-.029

-.610**

-.699**

1

.056

-.083

-.941**

-.831**

-.486**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.173

.000

.000

.063

.840

.000

.000

.692

.559

.000

.000

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant9

Pearson Correlation

.560**

-.046

-.005

-.046

-.320*

.208

-.095

.056

1

.923**

.064

-.160

.372**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.744

.970

.746

.021

.138

.504

.692

.000

.652

.258

.007

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

10

Pearson Correlation

.518**

.103

.128

-.012

-.441**

.383**

.101

-.083

.923**

1

.171

-.057

.319*

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.469

.365

.931

.001

.005

.478

.559

.000

.224

.688

.021

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

11

Pearson Correlation

.145

.478**

.690**

-.197

.035

.577**

.660**

-.941**

.064

.171

1

.800**

.502**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.305

.000

.000

.161

.805

.000

.000

.000

.652

.224

.000

.000

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant 12

Pearson Correlation

.089

.419**

.533**

-.020

.327*

.461**

.533**

-.831**

-.160

-.057

.800**

1

.375**

Sig. (2-tailed)

.530

.002

.000

.887

.018

.001

.000

.000

.258

.688

.000

.006

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

Prices Variant

13

Pearson Correlation

.546**

.463**

.128

-.144

-.089

.142

.091

-.486**

.372**

.319*

.502**

.375**

1

Sig. (2-tailed)

.000

.001

.364

.307

.533

.315

.522

.000

.007

.021

.000

.006

N

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

52

*. Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed).

**. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Table 2 represents the significant correlation between various prices. The findings of correlation analysis are as follows: unit price of Variant 1 is significantly correlated with the unit price of Variant 9, 10 and 13. In addition, unit price of Variant 2 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 8, 11 and13. The unit price of Variant 3 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 6, 7, 8, 11 and12. While the unit price of Variant 4 is not significantly correlated with any of other variants. In addition, unit price of Variant 5 is only correlated with unit price of Variant 10. Moreover, unit price of Variant 9 is significantly correlated with unit price of Variant 1 and 10.


Part (b)


Closely Related Variant – In Terms of Prices

The correlation analysis in Table 2 has presented various variants that are closely related to each other in terms of their prices. The analysis demonstrated that prices of Variant 10 are closely and strongly related with prices of Variant 9.In addition, prices of Variant 11 are closely related with Variant 12. The prices of Variant 1 are closely related to prices of Variant 9. The prices of Variant 3 are closely related to prices of Variant 2 and Variant 8 and prices of Variant 7 are closely related with prices of Variant 8.


Methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity:

There are various methods for detecting and solving multicollinearity, some of these methods include:


Detecting Multicollinearity:

Variation Inflation Factor can be used to detect the multicollinearity between the variables. In addition correlation matrix and correlation plot method can be also used for detecting the multicollinearity


Solving Multicollinearity:

The methods which can be used to solve multicollinearity are as follows:

· The removal of one or more variables with a high correlation is a simple method of correcting multicollinearity. It significantly reduces the multicollinearity between correlated variables.

· Methodologies such as partial least squares regression and principal component analysis are also used for solving the multicollinearity.

· Through the breakdown of data into independent variables, PCA decreases the dimension of data. As a result, new variables with no association are generated.

· Centering the data can also solve the multicollinearity issues.


Part (c)


Exploratory factor analysis of Distribution Variants

Exploratory factor analysis is a statistical approach for reducing data into a smaller number of summary variables and exploring the phenomena’s fundamental theoretical structure. It’s implemented to find out how the relationship between the variable and the respondent is structured. The Exploratory factor analysis of Distribution variants is conducted through SPSS. KMO and Bartlett’s test is presented in Table 3:

Table 3: KMO and Bartlett’s test

KMO and Bartlett’s Test

Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.

.612

Bartlett’s Test of Sphericity

Approx. Chi-Square

1024.101

df

78

Sig.

.000

Table 3 represents the findings of KMO and Bartlett’s test. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) statistic evaluate the appropriateness of factor analysis and a high test statistic between 0.5 and 1 indicates that the data is appropriate for factor analysis.

Accounting homework help

Discussion 1

Tana Thorne works in a public accounting firm and hopes to eventually be a partner. The

management of Allnet Company invites Thorne to prepare a bid to audit Allnet’s financial statements. In discussing the audit fee, Allnet’s management suggests a fee range in which the amount depends on the reported profit of Allnet. The higher its profit, the higher will be the audit fee paid to Thorne’s firm.

Required (least 300 words )

1. Identify the parties potentially affected by this audit and the fee plan proposed. 

2. What are the ethical factors in this situation? Explain.

3. Would you recommend that Thorne accept this audit fee arrangement? Why or why not?

4. Describe some ethical considerations guiding your recommendation.

Accounting homework help

Assignment Information:

· Use A4 size page leaving at least a 2.5cm margin on either side, Arial 11 font, single spaced

· This assignment is worth 15% of the total assessment for this unit. This assignment will be marked out of 50 and scaled down to being out of 15.

· Word Limit: Word limit is kept open.

· Follow Harvard Referencing Style in the Assignment.

Question

“The definition of liabilities is comprehensive in its coverage: indeed, some would argue that it is too comprehensive in that it does not attempt to distinguish between liabilities and commitments. It includes obligations arising from firm contracts where neither the entity nor the counterparty has honoured its promises.”

References:

Australian Accounting Research Foundation (AARF), (1998),” Measurement in Financial Accounting”, Accounting Theory Monograph, AARF, Melbourne, p. 36.

Required:

A. Describe what you understand by the term liabilities and briefly summarize the various ways they are and can be measured by entities. [10 marks]

B. Explain what you think is meant by the AARF statement. [10 marks]

C. Discuss liabilities and the problems of their measurement in the context of the conceptual framework. [10 marks]

D. Select a company from the Australian Securities Exchange website and download the 2021 annual report. Explain the categorization and treatment of liabilities in the annual report. [10 marks]

E. Establish links between the measurement of liabilities in your selected annual report and decision-useful information. Please refer to examples from your selected annual report. [10 marks]

The following rubrics/comments should provide you with a guide on how the Assignment will be assessed.

QA: Excellent understanding of liabilities, types of liabilities and measurement.

QB: Excellent understanding of liabilities concept by AARF.

QC: Excellent understanding of liabilities and the problems of their measurement in the context of the conceptual framework.

QD: Excellent explanation the categorization and treatment of liabilities in the selected annual report.

QE: Excellent Establish links between the measurement of liabilities in your selected annual report and decision useful information

Accounting homework help

Discussion #1 and #2: All components of discussion prompt addressed in initial posting. Very clear that readings were understood by incorporation into postings. Includes research, in-text citations, and a formal references page in APA style. Post has no errors in spelling, grammar, sentence structure, etc.

Discussion #1: For your initial post, review your email inbox. Note any work-related or business-related emails. These could be from professionals, bosses, coworkers, or a business that you use (for instance, a bank or other company that emails you as a client of customer). Without providing names or other identifying information, copy and paste the communication. Next, list the ways this communication could have been more effective had it followed the guidelines provided in Chapter 4 Revising Business Messages.

Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2018). Essentials of Business Communication (11th Edition). Cengage Learning US. https://ccis.vitalsource.com/books/9781337670791

Discussion #2: In your initial post, describe the technology used on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for a business. This could be where you work, or it could be the communication you receive on a regular basis from a company of which you are a customer. What does that communication look like? What forms of digital communication are used? How often? Is this the most effective means of communication given the audience? Why or why not? Can you defend the idea of reducing the methods of communication? Should they increase the methods of communication?

Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2018). Essentials of Business Communication (11th Edition). Cengage Learning US. https://ccis.vitalsource.com/books/9781337670791

Accounting homework help

ACCT 611 – Managerial Accounting Name _____________________________

Final Examination

Due Thursday, May 5, 2022

1. DRC Incorporated is preparing its cash budget for December. The budgeted beginning cash balance is $23,000. Budgeted cash receipts total $114,000 and budgeted cash disbursements total $89,000. The desired ending cash balance is $65,000. The company can borrow up to $110,000 at any time from a local bank, with interest not due until the following month. (30 points)

Required:

Prepare the company’s cash budget for December in good form. Make sure to indicate what borrowing, if any, would be needed to attain the desired ending cash balance.

2. Arien Diner is a charity supported by donations that provide free meals to the homeless. The diner’s budget for February was based on 4,000 meals, but the diner served 3,400 meals. The diner’s director has provided the following cost formulas to use in budgets: (35 points)

 

Fixed costs

per month

 

Variable cost

per meal

Groceries

$

0

 

 

$

2.20

 

Kitchen operations

$

4,100

 

 

$

1.90

 

Administrative expenses

$

3,600

 

 

$

0.60

 

Fundraising expenses

$

1,100

 

 

$

0.00

 

Required:

Prepare the diner’s flexible budget for the actual number of meals served in February. The budget will only contain the costs listed above; no revenues will be on the budget.

3. Forrest Company reported the following results from last year’s operations: (35 points)

Sales

$7,200,000

Variable expenses

5,210,000

Contribution margin

1,990,000

Fixed expenses

1,486,000

Net operating income

$504,000

Average operating assets

$4,000,000

At the beginning of this year, the company has a $1,200,000 investment opportunity with the following characteristics:

Sales

$1,560,000

Contribution margin ratio

30%

of sales

Fixed expenses

$343,200

The company’s minimum required rate of return is 14%.

Required:

a. What was last year’s margin? (Round to the nearest 0.1%.)

b. What was last year’s turnover? (Round to the nearest 0.01.)

c. What was last year’s return on investment (ROI)? (Round to the nearest 0.1%.)

d. What is the ROI related to this year’s investment opportunity? (Round to the nearest 0.1%.)

e. If Forrest’s chief executive officer earns a bonus only if the ROI for this year exceeds the ROI for last year, would the CEO pursue the investment opportunity?

f. Would the owners of the company want the CEO to pursue the investment opportunity?

4. HDT Corporation’s management keeps track of the time it takes to process orders. During the most recent month, the following average times (days) were recorded per order: (30 points)

 

Wait time 6.2

Inspection time 2.4

Process time 3.7

Move time 2.3

Queue time 3.7

Required:

a. Compute the throughput time. 

b. Compute the manufacturing cycle efficiency (MCE).

c. What percentage of the production time is spent in non-value-added activities? 

d. Compute the delivery cycle time. 

5. Felicity Company currently buys 50,000 units of a part used to manufacture its product at $200 per unit. Recently the supplier informed Wildcat Company that a 20 percent increase will take effect next year. Wildcat has some additional space and could produce the units for the following per-unit costs (based on 50,000 units): (35 points)

Direct materials

$72

Direct labor

68

Variable overhead

60

Fixed overhead

 52

Total

$252

If the units are purchased from the supplier, Felicity would continue to incur $700,000 of fixed costs.

Required:

a. Should Felicity Company buy the parts externally or make them internally? Prepare differential analysis to support your decision.

b. Should Felicity Company buy the parts externally or make them internally, assuming that they can rent the plant for $350,000 per year to Alpha Corporation when the parts are purchased externally? Prepare differential analysis to support your decision.

6. Fatima Corporation has the following information about the purchase of a new piece of equipment: (35 points)

Cash revenues less cash expenses $40,000 per year

Cost of equipment $70,000

Salvage value at the end of the 6th year $7,000

Increase in working capital requirements $30,000

Tax rate 30 percent

Life 6 years

The cost of capital is 11 percent.

Required:

a. Calculate the following assuming straight-line depreciation:

i. Calculate the after-tax net income for each of the six years.

ii. Calculate the after-tax cash flows for each of the six years.

iii. Calculate the after-tax payback period.

iv. Calculate the accrual accounting rate of return on original investment for each of the six years.

v. Calculate the net present value (NPV).

vi. Calculate the internal rate of return (IRR).

b. Calculate the following assuming that depreciation expense is $18,000, $15,000, $12,000, $9,000, $6,000 and $3,000 for years 1 through 6, respectively:

i. Calculate the after-tax cash flows for each of the six years.

ii. Calculate the after-tax payback period.

iii. Calculate the net present value (NPV).

iv. Calculate the internal rate of return (IRR).

Bonus question (15 points)

Information from the records of the Freya Corporation for the month of April 2019 is as follows:

Direct materials inventory, beginning $25,000

Direct materials inventory, ending 28,000

Direct labor 45,000

Direct material purchases 58,000

Factory wages 18,000

Finished goods inventory, beginning 25,000

Finished goods inventory, ending 22,000

Indirect materials 11,000

Rent on factory building 23,000

Sales 220,000

Selling and administrative expenses 21,000

Utilities in the factory 12,000

WIP inventory, beginning 7,000

WIP inventory, ending 15,000

Assume a tax rate of 30 percent.

Required:

a. Calculate direct materials used for April.

b. Calculate the cost of goods manufactured for April.

c. Calculate gross profit for April.

d. Calculate after-tax net income for April.

e. Calculate prime costs for April.

f Calculate conversion costs for April.

Accounting homework help

UL19/0075

Page 1 of 5

THIS PAPER IS NOT TO BE REMOVED FROM THE EXAMINATION HALL

AC3193 ZA

BSc DEGREES AND GRADUATE DIPLOMAS IN ECONOMICS, MANAGEMENT,
FINANCE AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES, THE DIPLOMA IN ECONOMICS AND
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND THE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION IN SOCIAL
SCIENCES

Accounting Theory

Tuesday 7 May 2019: 10.00 – 13.00

Time allowed: 3 hours

DO NOT TURN OVER UNTIL TOLD TO BEGIN

Candidates should answer FOUR of the following EIGHT questions: TWO from
Section A and TWO from Section B. All questions carry equal marks. If you answer
more than two from any section, only the first two answers will be marked.

Workings should be submitted for all questions requiring calculations. Any necessary
assumptions introduced in answering a question are to be stated.

Extracts from compound interest tables are given after the final question on this paper.

A handheld calculator may be used when answering questions on this paper and it
must comply in all respects with the specification given with your Admission Notice.
The make and type of machine must be clearly stated on the front cover of the answer
book.

© University of London 2019

UL19/0075

Page 2 of 5

Section A

Answer any TWO questions from this section.

1. SandyMandy Ltd is a company that specialises in the disposal of construction

waste. The company does not find it useful to rely on modified historical cost values
and is considering alternative valuations of its non-current assets. The company’s
accountant has collected a range of values on three of its lorries (non-current
assets). The information is presented in the table below:

SandyMandy Ltd Truck P Truck Q Truck R

£ £ £

Historical cost of asset 84,600 274,000 153,800

Annual depreciation rate 10% 10% 10%

Expected sales value net of all selling costs 57,000 132,400 143,000
Current purchase price of an asset in a
similar condition 95,000 299,000 235,600

The following additional notes on the three lorries may be relevant:

 Truck P is used as a stand-by vehicle for when other lorries are off the road due to

breakdowns or scheduled maintenance. If the use of Truck P was not available it
is estimated that SandyMandy Ltd would have to spend £24,300 per annum to rent
an equivalent truck from another firm. Annual maintenance costs for Truck P is
£19,600. It is expected that a stand-by facility will be continuously offered to ensure
that the company is able to operate even when its vehicles are off the road.

 Truck Q is one of the company’s regularly used vehicles. It has an expected life of

12 years and the company is able to generate £38,500 annually during its expected
life from the use of this asset.

 Truck R is another of the company’s frequently used vehicles. It has an expected

life of 8 years and is able to generate £35,000 annually for the span of its expected
life.

The company’s expected return on capital invested is 10%.

Required:

a) What is deprival value? Critically assess the usefulness of deprival value for a
company like SandyMandy Ltd.

(11 marks)

b) Calculate the deprival value for Trucks P, Q and R to the nearest £1. You should
ignore the effects of taxation.

(14 marks)

(Total: 25 marks)

UL19/0075

Page 3 of 5

2. Compare, contrast and critically evaluate two alternative ‘positive / descriptive’
theories of accounting regulation in practice.

(25 marks)

3. Describe and critically evaluate Chua’s (1986) attempt to classify different

approaches to the development of accounting theories.
(25 marks)

4. What type of accounting theory might be understood as critical? Give examples

of critical approaches and assess their contribution to accounting theory.
(25 marks)

Section B

Answer any TWO questions from this section.

5. In relation to management control, what is the issue of myopia and how does it

arise? How might one attempt to resolve this myopia problem?
(25 marks)

6. How does the type of organisational unit or business context impact upon the

method of setting budget targets? What issues are relevant in setting the difficulty
level of targets?

(25 marks)

7. How should management control systems be adapted in the context of a

company expanding into a new environment?
(25 marks)

8. Outline the strengths and limitations of using market-based measures of
performance in the context of management control.

(25 marks)

END OF PAPER

UL19/0075

Page 4 of 5

Present Value interest factor per £1.00 due at the end of n years for interest rate of:
% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
n
1 0.990 0.980 0.971 0.962 0.952 0.943 0.935 0.926 0.917 0.909
2 0.980 0.961 0.943 0.925 0.907 0.890 0.873 0.857 0.842 0.826
3 0.971 0.942 0.915 0.889 0.864 0.840 0.816 0.794 0.772 0.751
4 0.961 0.924 0.888 0.855 0.823 0.792 0.763 0.735 0.708 0.683
5 0.951 0.906 0.863 0.822 0.784 0.747 0.713 0.681 0.650 0.621
6 0.942 0.888 0.837 0.790 0.746 0.705 0.666 0.630 0.596 0.564
7 0.933 0.871 0.813 0.760 0.711 0.665 0.623 0.583 0.547 0.513
8 0.923 0.853 0.789 0.731 0.677 0.627 0.582 0.540 0.502 0.467
9 0.914 0.837 0.766 0.703 0.645 0.592 0.544 0.500 0.460 0.424

10 0.905 0.820 0.744 0.676 0.614 0.558 0.508 0.463 0.422 0.386
11 0.896 0.804 0.722 0.650 0.585 0.527 0.475 0.429 0.388 0.350
12 0.887 0.788 0.701 0.625 0.557 0.497 0.444 0.397 0.356 0.319
13 0.879 0.773 0.681 0.601 0.530 0.469 0.415 0.368 0.326 0.290
14 0.870 0.758 0.661 0.577 0.505 0.442 0.388 0.340 0.299 0.263
15 0.861 0.743 0.642 0.555 0.481 0.417 0.362 0.315 0.275 0.239
16 0.853 0.728 0.623 0.534 0.458 0.394 0.339 0.292 0.252 0.218
17 0.844 0.714 0.605 0.513 0.436 0.371 0.317 0.270 0.231 0.198
18 0.836 0.700 0.587 0.494 0.416 0.350 0.296 0.250 0.212 0.180
19 0.828 0.686 0.570 0.475 0.396 0.331 0.277 0.232 0.194 0.164
20 0.820 0.673 0.554 0.456 0.377 0.312 0.258 0.215 0.178 0.149
21 0.811 0.660 0.538 0.439 0.359 0.294 0.242 0.199 0.164 0.135
22 0.803 0.647 0.522 0.422 0.342 0.278 0.226 0.184 0.150 0.123
23 0.795 0.634 0.507 0.406 0.326 0.262 0.211 0.170 0.138 0.112
24 0.788 0.622 0.492 0.390 0.310 0.247 0.197 0.158 0.126 0.102
25 0.780 0.610 0.478 0.375 0.295 0.233 0.184 0.146 0.116 0.092

% 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
n
1 0.901 0.893 0.885 0.877 0.870 0.862 0.855 0.847 0.840 0.833
2 0.812 0.797 0.783 0.769 0.756 0.743 0.731 0.718 0.706 0.694
3 0.731 0.712 0.693 0.675 0.658 0.641 0.624 0.609 0.593 0.579
4 0.659 0.636 0.613 0.592 0.572 0.552 0.534 0.516 0.499 0.482
5 0.593 0.567 0.543 0.519 0.497 0.476 0.456 0.437 0.419 0.402
6 0.535 0.507 0.480 0.456 0.432 0.410 0.390 0.370 0.352 0.335
7 0.482 0.452 0.425 0.400 0.376 0.354 0.333 0.314 0.296 0.279
8 0.434 0.404 0.376 0.351 0.327 0.305 0.285 0.266 0.249 0.233
9 0.391 0.361 0.333 0.308 0.284 0.263 0.243 0.225 0.209 0.194

10 0.352 0.322 0.295 0.270 0.247 0.227 0.208 0.191 0.176 0.162
11 0.317 0.287 0.261 0.237 0.215 0.195 0.178 0.162 0.148 0.135
12 0.286 0.257 0.231 0.208 0.187 0.168 0.152 0.137 0.124 0.112
13 0.258 0.229 0.204 0.182 0.163 0.145 0.130 0.116 0.104 0.093
14 0.232 0.205 0.181 0.160 0.141 0.125 0.111 0.099 0.088 0.078
15 0.209 0.183 0.160 0.140 0.123 0.108 0.095 0.084 0.074 0.065
16 0.188 0.163 0.141 0.123 0.107 0.093 0.081 0.071 0.062 0.054
17 0.170 0.146 0.125 0.108 0.093 0.080 0.069 0.060 0.052 0.045
18 0.153 0.130 0.111 0.095 0.081 0.069 0.059 0.051 0.044 0.038
19 0.138 0.116 0.098 0.083 0.070 0.060 0.051 0.043 0.037 0.031
20 0.124 0.104 0.087 0.073 0.061 0.051 0.043 0.037 0.031 0.026
21 0.112 0.093 0.077 0.064 0.053 0.044 0.037 0.031 0.026 0.022
22 0.101 0.083 0.068 0.056 0.046 0.038 0.032 0.026 0.022 0.018
23 0.091 0.074 0.060 0.049 0.040 0.033 0.027 0.022 0.018 0.015
24 0.082 0.066 0.053 0.043 0.035 0.028 0.023 0.019 0.015 0.013
25 0.074 0.059 0.047 0.038 0.030 0.024 0.020 0.016 0.013 0.010

UL19/0075

Page 5 of 5

Present Value interest factor for an annuity of £1.00 for a series of n years for interest
rate of:
% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
n
1 0.990 0.980 0.971 0.962 0.952 0.943 0.935 0.926 0.917 0.909
2 1.970 1.942 1.913 1.886 1.859 1.833 1.808 1.783 1.759 1.736
3 2.941 2.884 2.829 2.775 2.723 2.673 2.624 2.577 2.531 2.487
4 3.902 3.808 3.717 3.630 3.546 3.465 3.387 3.312 3.240 3.170
5 4.853 4.713 4.580 4.452 4.329 4.212 4.100 3.993 3.890 3.791
6 5.795 5.601 5.417 5.242 5.076 4.917 4.767 4.623 4.486 4.355
7 6.728 6.472 6.230 6.002 5.786 5.582 5.389 5.206 5.033 4.868
8 7.652 7.325 7.020 6.733 6.463 6.210 5.971 5.747 5.535 5.335
9 8.566 8.162 7.786 7.435 7.108 6.802 6.515 6.247 5.995 5.759

10 9.471 8.983 8.530 8.111 7.722 7.360 7.024 6.710 6.418 6.145
11 10.368 9.787 9.253 8.760 8.306 7.887 7.499 7.139 6.805 6.495
12 11.255 10.575 9.954 9.385 8.863 8.384 7.943 7.536 7.161 6.814
13 12.134 11.348 10.635 9.986 9.394 8.853 8.358 7.904 7.487 7.103
14 13.004 12.106 11.296 10.563 9.899 9.295 8.745 8.244 7.786 7.367
15 13.865 12.849 11.938 11.118 10.380 9.712 9.108 8.559 8.061 7.606
16 14.718 13.578 12.561 11.652 10.838 10.106 9.447 8.851 8.313 7.824
17 15.562 14.292 13.166 12.166 11.274 10.477 9.763 9.122 8.544 8.022
18 16.398 14.992 13.754 12.659 11.690 10.828 10.059 9.372 8.756 8.201
19 17.226 15.678 14.324 13.134 12.085 11.158 10.336 9.604 8.950 8.365
20 18.046 16.351 14.877 13.590 12.462 11.470 10.594 9.818 9.129 8.514
21 18.857 17.011 15.415 14.029 12.821 11.764 10.836 10.017 9.292 8.649
22 19.660 17.658 15.937 14.451 13.163 12.042 11.061 10.201 9.442 8.772
23 20.456 18.292 16.444 14.857 13.489 12.303 11.272 10.371 9.580 8.883
24 21.243 18.914 16.936 15.247 13.799 12.550 11.469 10.529 9.707 8.985
25 22.023 19.523 17.413 15.622 14.094 12.783 11.654 10.675 9.823 9.077

% 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
n
1 0.901 0.893 0.885 0.877 0.870 0.862 0.855 0.847 0.840 0.833
2 1.713 1.690 1.668 1.647 1.626 1.605 1.585 1.566 1.547 1.528
3 2.444 2.402 2.361 2.322 2.283 2.246 2.210 2.174 2.140 2.106
4 3.102 3.037 2.974 2.914 2.855 2.798 2.743 2.690 2.639 2.589
5 3.696 3.605 3.517 3.433 3.352 3.274 3.199 3.127 3.058 2.991
6 4.231 4.111 3.998 3.889 3.784 3.685 3.589 3.498 3.410 3.326
7 4.712 4.564 4.423 4.288 4.160 4.039 3.922 3.812 3.706 3.605
8 5.146 4.968 4.799 4.639 4.487 4.344 4.207 4.078 3.954 3.837
9 5.537 5.328 5.132 4.946 4.772 4.607 4.451 4.303 4.163 4.031

10 5.889 5.650 5.426 5.216 5.019 4.833 4.659 4.494 4.339 4.192
11 6.207 5.938 5.687 5.453 5.234 5.029 4.836 4.656 4.486 4.327
12 6.492 6.194 5.918 5.660 5.421 5.197 4.988 4.793 4.611 4.439
13 6.750 6.424 6.122 5.842 5.583 5.342 5.118 4.910 4.715 4.533
14 6.982 6.628 6.302 6.002 5.724 5.468 5.229 5.008 4.802 4.611
15 7.191 6.811 6.462 6.142 5.847 5.575 5.324 5.092 4.876 4.675
16 7.379 6.974 6.604 6.265 5.954 5.668 5.405 5.162 4.938 4.730
17 7.549 7.120 6.729 6.373 6.047 5.749 5.475 5.222 4.990 4.775
18 7.702 7.250 6.840 6.467 6.128 5.818 5.534 5.273 5.033 4.812
19 7.839 7.366 6.938 6.550 6.198 5.877 5.584 5.316 5.070 4.843
20 7.963 7.469 7.025 6.623 6.259 5.929 5.628 5.353 5.101 4.870
21 8.075 7.562 7.102 6.687 6.312 5.973 5.665 5.384 5.127 4.891
22 8.176 7.645 7.170 6.743 6.359 6.011 5.696 5.410 5.149 4.909
23 8.266 7.718 7.230 6.792 6.399 6.044 5.723 5.432 5.167 4.925
24 8.348 7.784 7.283 6.835 6.434 6.073 5.746 5.451 5.182 4.937
25 8.422 7.843 7.330 6.873 6.464 6.097 5.766 5.467 5.195 4.948

Accounting homework help

Discussion 1

Tana Thorne works in a public accounting firm and hopes to eventually be a partner. The

management of Allnet Company invites Thorne to prepare a bid to audit Allnet’s financial statements. In discussing the audit fee, Allnet’s management suggests a fee range in which the amount depends on the reported profit of Allnet. The higher its profit, the higher will be the audit fee paid to Thorne’s firm.

Required (least 300 words )

1. Identify the parties potentially affected by this audit and the fee plan proposed. 

2. What are the ethical factors in this situation? Explain.

3. Would you recommend that Thorne accept this audit fee arrangement? Why or why not?

4. Describe some ethical considerations guiding your recommendation.

Accounting homework help

1

Figures title: 11

Week 6 External and Internal Environments Assignment

Student’s Full Name

BUS499 Business Administration Capstone

Professor’s Name

Date

Template Instructions (delete this page before submitting)

This template is provided to help you meet the assignment requirements.

This page should NOT be submitted with your assignment, as it is not part of an academically written paper. Note the “Clarity, writing mechanics, and formatting requirements” section of the grading rubric.


HOW TO USE THIS TEMPLATE

· Read the explanations provided in the template for each section of your paper.

· The explanations are in blue font below.

· You should have already read the assignment instructions in Blackboard.

· Type your response to each of the assignment requirements within the designated sections.

· Each assignment requirement is identified using a section Heading that is in black font

· DO NOT add extra spaces between sections.

· DO NOT change the margins.

· You are required to have a heading for each of the sections in your paper.

· The required headings have been provided for you.

· Follow the instructions below to customize the Headings as directed.

· DO NOT type the assignment instructions into the sections.

· After typing your responses, change the font color to black and make sure it is not in bold.

· Be sure to change the font color on the title page to black after typing your name, professor’s name, and date.

· Everything in blue font below should be deleted and replaced with your responses.

· DELETE this entire page before you submit your assignment to avoid losing points. Do not leave a blank page here.


REMINDERS

· The assignment is due in week 6. Late submissions negatively impact your grade.

· Use the same public corporation you used for the Week 3 assignment.

· Do not copy content from other assignments in this class or others.

· Include at least 4 full and complete academically written pages that address the requirements. The title page, this instruction page, and the source page do not count.

· Use at least 3 quality sources, one of which MUST be the course textbook.

· Strayer uses SafeAssign – an automated plagiarism checker. It is advised that you do your own writing and use external resources to support what you have written in your own words.

Week 6 External and Internal Environments Assignment

Write your introduction here. Include one paragraph (not more than 6 lines of text) that explains what your paper will discuss. Much of your introduction may be taken from the assignment instructions (in your own words). Read all assignment resources to understand what should be included in your paper. Be sure to review the assignment instructions in Blackboard, the grading rubric, and relevant course announcements to understand the requirements. Do not exceed 6 lines of text in this introduction. There should be no direct quotes in this section. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your introduction and change the font color to black.

General Environment

In this section you will choose the two segments of the general environment that would rank highest in their influence on the public corporation you chose for assignment 1. You must select from the segments discussed in the course. Hint: see table 2.1 in the textbook. Do not assess all the segments—only assess the two segments that rank highest in influencing your corporation. You will then assess how these segments affect the corporation and the industry in which it operates. There are two subsections below, each has a heading. The heading “Segment 1” should be changed to the first segment of the general environment you select. The heading “Segment 2” should be changed to the second segment of the general environment you select. Replace this paragraph with a very brief introduction that includes the identification of the two segments of the general environment you selected and change the font color to black.

Segment 1

This subsection is where you assess the first of the two segments of the general environment you think ranks highest in its influence on the public corporation you chose for the Week 3 assignment. Change the subheading for this section, which currently says “Segment 1” to the name of the selected segment. Assess how this segment affects the corporation and the industry in which it operates. Remember that to assess a concept, you will weigh all aspects to judge the importance or relevance of that concept. Do not simply define the segment. Do not copy from your Week 3 assignment submission.

Your assessment should demonstrate that you have read, understand, and can apply the concepts covered in the course resources regarding the segment. Your writing here should thoroughly assess how the selected segment influences your corporation. Do not write about the general environment in general terms. Your assessment should be directly related to your selected corporation. A thorough assessment is defined as providing a complete response that is not superficial or partial regarding the various details of the concepts as described in the course. You will need to apply and incorporate key concepts from the course material to your assessment. Do not Google “segments of the general environment” or provide high-level summaries. You must display, in specific detail, an understanding based on what is studied in this course and demonstrate your ability to apply the concepts in a real-world assessment of a corporation. Read chapter 2 in the course textbook. Review the Week 2 Learn Reading for supporting content. Properly cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your assessment and change the font color to black.

Segment 2

This subsection is where you assess the second of the two segments of the general environment you selected. Change the subheading for this section, which currently says “Segment 2” to the name of the selected segment of the general environment that would rank highest in its influence on the public corporation you chose for the Week 2 assignment. Repeat the evaluation instructions provided in the “Segment 1” subsection above for this second segment of the general environment. Re-read the instructions above to ensure you have covered all of the requirements for this second segment of the general environment. After completing this section, replace this blue text with your evaluation and change the font color to black.

Five Forces of Competition

In this section you will consider the five forces of competition and choose the two that you estimate are the most significant for the corporation you chose in assignment 1. Hint: see figure 2.2 in the textbook. You will then, evaluate how well the company has addressed each of these two forces in the recent past. There are two subsections below, each has a heading. The heading “Force 1” should be changed to the first of the two forces of competition you select. The heading “Force 2” should be changed to the second of the two forces of competition you select. Replace this paragraph with a very brief introduction that includes the identification of the two forces of competition you selected and change the font color to black.

Force 1

This subsection is where you evaluate the first of two forces of competition that you estimate to be the most significant to the corporation you chose. Change the subheading for this section, which currently says “Force 1” to the name of your selected force. Provide a thorough assessment of why you think the selected force is significant to your corporation. A thorough assessment is defined as providing a complete response that is not superficial or partial regarding the various details of the concept as described in the course. Do not Google “five forces of competition” or simply provide a definition. You will need to apply and incorporate key concepts from the course material in your assessment.

Evaluate how well the company addressed the selected force in the recent past. This will require some research. Remember that to evaluate a concept, you will break down all components to determine or analyze facts, value, or views. Your evaluation should demonstrate that you have read, understand, and can apply the concepts covered in the textbook and course resources. Do not write about the selected force in general terms. Your evaluation should be directly related to your selected corporation and include a thorough evaluation of how the company has addressed the force recently. You must display an understanding based on what is studied in this course and demonstrate an ability to apply the concepts in a real-world evaluation of a corporation. You will need to read the chapters and listen to the lectures to understand the key concepts for each force. Read chapter 2 in the course textbook and review the Week 2 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite all sources and limit the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your evaluation and change the font color to black.

Force 2

Choose another one of the five forces of competition that you estimate to be the most significant for the corporation you chose. This should not be the same force assessed in the “Force 1” section above. Change the subheading for this section, which currently says “Force 2” to the name of the selected force. This subsection is where you evaluate the second of the two forces of competition that you selected. Repeat the evaluation instructions provided in the “Force 1” subsection above for this second force of competition. Re-read the instructions above to ensure you have covered all of the requirements for this second force of competition. After completing this section, replace this blue text with your evaluation and change the font color to black.

Future Improvements

With the same two forces assessed and evaluated in the previous two sub-sections above, predict what the company might do to improve its ability to address the forces in the near future. Your writing here should provide a thorough prediction of what the company should do to address impacts from the selected forces. Do not simply discuss company information published by your sources. This section should be your prediction of what the corporation should do. Your prediction should be your own, not predictions or recommendations from your sources or actions your corporation has already taken or plans to take. Remember that a thorough evaluation is defined as providing a complete response that is not superficial or partial regarding the various details of the concepts as described in the course. Your prediction should be specific to your selected corporation, relevant to the evaluation you conducted, and directly related to improvements the corporation could make to address the two forces you selected in the two sub-sections above. Read chapter 2 in the course textbook and review the Week 2 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your prediction and change the font color to black.

Greatest External Threat

Identify what you consider to be the greatest external threat to the corporation you selected. The threat should be specific to your corporation. Justify why you consider the threat to be the greatest. Support your justification with an assessment of the impact the threat has on the corporation. For example, your justification could include a comparison of other threats or an evaluation of facts that support the magnitude of the threat’s impact. Follow this justification with a discussion on how the corporation should address the threat. Specifically describe the strategy and provide a justification that supports why you believe the strategy will be successful in combating the threat. This section must include both a clearly identified external threat and a clearly articulated action\strategy the corporation should take to address the threat. Do not write in general terms. Your writing here should be specific and incorporate the course concepts relating to threats and the external environment. Read chapter 2 in the course textbook. The textbook provides a solid background for this section. Review the Week 2 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your response and change the font color to black.

Greatest Opportunity

Identify what you consider to be the greatest opportunity to the corporation you selected. The opportunity should be specific to your corporation. Justify why you consider the opportunity to be the greatest. Support your justification with an assessment of the impact the opportunity could have on the corporation. For example, your justification could include a comparison of other opportunities or an evaluation of facts that support the magnitude of the opportunity’s impact. Follow this justification with a discussion on how the corporation could best take advantage of the opportunity. Specifically describe the strategy and provide a justification that supports why you believe the strategy will be successful in adding value to the corporation. This section must include both a clearly identified opportunity and a clearly articulated action the corporation should take to take advantage of the opportunity. Do not write in general terms. Your writing here should be specific and incorporate the course concepts relating to opportunities and the external environment. Read chapter 2 in the course textbook. The textbook provides a solid background for this section. Review the Week 2 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your response and change the font color to black.

Strengths and Weaknesses

Give your opinion on the corporation’s greatest strengths and most significant weaknesses. Keep in mind that strengths and weaknesses are internal to the organization (i.e. the internal environment). You will need to address both the greatest strengths and most significant weaknesses. Do not choose one or the other. Both the greatest strengths and most significant weaknesses must be addressed. Do not write in general terms. The identified strengths and weaknesses should be specific to your selected corporation. Include a justification that supports your opinions. This section must include both clearly identified strengths and clearly identified weaknesses. Read Chapter 2 and 3 in the course textbook. The textbook provides a solid background for this section. Review the Week 2 and Week 3 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your application and change the font color to black.

Strategy or Tactic

Choose the strategies or tactics the corporation should select to take maximum advantage of the strengths you identified in the section above, and the strategies or tactics the corporation should select to fix the most significant weaknesses you identified. You will need to select strategies/tactics for both the strengths and weaknesses. Do not choose one or the other. Strategies/tactics for both the strengths and weaknesses must be addressed. Justify your choices. Your justifications should be sound and thoroughly explained. For example, do not simply state that the corporation should choose a selected strategy, but rather explain why the strategy is a good choice for your corporations’ specific strengths or weaknesses. Read Chapter 2 and 3 in the course textbook. The textbook provides a solid background for this section. Review the Week 2 and Week 3 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your responses and change the font color to black.

Resources, Capabilities, and Core Competencies

Determine the company’s resources, capabilities, and core competencies. Your determination should include an explanation of the relevance of each resource, capability, and core competency. Do not simply list the resources, capabilities, and core competencies. Remember that a thorough determination will provide a complete response that is not superficial or partial regarding the various details of the concepts as described in the course. Use your course materials to demonstrate your understanding of the key course concepts regarding resources, capabilities, and core competencies. Do not write in general terms. Your determination should display that you can apply the course concepts to your selected corporation.
R

ead Chapter 3 in the course textbook. The textbook provides a solid background to this section. Review the Week 3 Learn Reading for supporting content. Cite your sources and avoid the use of direct quotes. After reading these instructions, replace this blue text with your determination and change the font color to black.

Sources

1. Michael A. Hitt. 2020. Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases: Competitiveness and Globalization 13th ed. Cengage Learning.

2. Author. Publication Date. Title. Page # (written as p. #). How to Find (e.g. web address)

3. Author. Publication Date. Title. Page # (written as p. #). How to Find (e.g. web address)

Accounting homework help

Discussion #1 and #2: All components of discussion prompt addressed in initial posting. Very clear that readings were understood by incorporation into postings. Includes research, in-text citations, and a formal references page in APA style. Post has no errors in spelling, grammar, sentence structure, etc.

Discussion #1: For your initial post, review your email inbox. Note any work-related or business-related emails. These could be from professionals, bosses, coworkers, or a business that you use (for instance, a bank or other company that emails you as a client of customer). Without providing names or other identifying information, copy and paste the communication. Next, list the ways this communication could have been more effective had it followed the guidelines provided in Chapter 4 Revising Business Messages.

Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2018). Essentials of Business Communication (11th Edition). Cengage Learning US. https://ccis.vitalsource.com/books/9781337670791

Discussion #2: In your initial post, describe the technology used on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for a business. This could be where you work, or it could be the communication you receive on a regular basis from a company of which you are a customer. What does that communication look like? What forms of digital communication are used? How often? Is this the most effective means of communication given the audience? Why or why not? Can you defend the idea of reducing the methods of communication? Should they increase the methods of communication?

Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2018). Essentials of Business Communication (11th Edition). Cengage Learning US. https://ccis.vitalsource.com/books/9781337670791

Accounting homework help


VRIO human resources (value, rareness, imitability, organization)

Children’s Nest has a friendly director that is clear about her goals. Her focus is completely on the development of all those students that are present in her care. She is very helpful towards her staff and students. (About Us) These capabilities make her valuable because it contributes to the healthy environment of the organization which ultimately leads to the success of the company. Her friendly behavior makes communication easy with staff, which means there is a great collaboration between her and her staff. A focused leader can lead her team in a more effective manner. These capabilities also make her rare, because it isn’t easy to find these qualities in a single person. Comment by Ashley Salaiz: Who is this referring to? Each center has a different director and Tripp manages all of them. Comment by Ashley Salaiz: When mentioning valuable, tie it to increasing revenues and/or decreasing costs.

Moreover, the experienced and innovative staff is the other success factor for Children’s nest. The diversity in staff makes them more effective. Their highly accommodating staff knows how to deal with the diverse behaviors of children. The staff used their experience for the development of the students. To create a nurturing environment, the staff uses their innovative knowledge, because they want to make a safe, loving, stimulating, and warm environment for their students. (About Us)

Furthermore, it is valuable because the staff is the asset of the organization. The success and growth of the organization depend on them. It isn’t rare because almost every organization demands experienced and innovative employees. It isn’t costly to imitate because every person knows about the trend of the market. To capture value, it is organized in the most effective manner, because parents will prefer teachers that are friendly, innovative and have experiences for their children. This factor will help to attract the attention of potential customers. Comment by Ashley Salaiz: When mentioning valuable, tie it to increasing revenues and/or decreasing costs.

Accounting homework help

In this project, you will be opening your own specialty cookie company to see how product costing methods and changes in production affect business decisions. You will be creating a series of reports and analyzing the results using the template provided to guide you through the project.

The learning objectives of this project are as follows:

1. Gain an understanding of product costing (direct materials, direct labor, and overhead).

2. Review job order costing.

3. Review process costing.

4. Make business decisions based on analyzing accounting data.

You will prepare a four- to five-page written report (including spreadsheets) with at least two scholarly sources using the  

Unit II Project Template

 . Your report will provide the following information:

Introduction

Part 1: Establish a cookie business selling only one type of specialty cookie with two employees making the cookies.

· Create a name and establish a location for the business.

· Construct a mission statement for the business.

· Decide on the type of cookie you want to make and sell.

Part 2: Develop costing and sales information for 1,000 cookies.

· Estimate and explain the cost per cookie based on job order costing (manufacturing overhead is 30% of direct labor costs). Prepare a job order cost sheet by researching and identifying the top five ingredients and their estimated costs as your direct materials. Research and identify the cost of wages for your two employees as your direct labor. It typically takes two days to make 1,000 cookies.

· Estimate and explain the cost per cookie based on process costing with 40% conversion costs. Identify the top three processes you feel are needed to make the cookies and prepare a production cost sheet for one of those processes.

· Estimate and explain the sales price you plan to set per cookie based on the cost data.

Part 3: Compare and contrast the costing methods used in this project, including which you believe provides the most useful information as a manager.

Part 4: Discuss what will happen to revenue if the number of the cookies sold increases or decreases.

Accounting homework help

Week 1 Project

Acct. 601

The topic that I am choosing to discuss in this paper is the world of fraud and how it can

affect a business both on the accounting side on the customer side. Fraud is a constant thing that

will always be around, and in more ways than just one. Since I am going into accounting, with

my undergraduate in finance, I feel that this is a big area to know about. A lot of companies out

there struggle with fraud, either from within the company, or from outside the company.

Knowing how to handle this is imperative for a company to be successful over a long period of

time. The first area I am looking to touch on is accounting fraud and how it could affect a

business. This is basically going to look more into the financial aspect of the company. Next we

are going to be touching on the factors that go into why companies would commit a fraudulent

act. Fraud isn’t just something that comes up to come up, companies are pushed to it and we are

going to look at why. Another type of fraud we are going to look at, and one that is very

important to me because of my line of work, is banking fraud. Since I have my undergraduate in

finance I feel that it is important that we touch on this a bit because it affects consumers, as well

as businesses. Knowing the importance of how to protect you in banking could really help a

company. Lastly I am going to look at international fraud since a lot of businesses out there

operate internationally. This is huge because international laws are different when it comes to the

financial aspects of a business and we are going to look at that as well.

Like I said at the beginning I feel this is a good topic to discuss in an accounting class

because not a lot of people are aware that fraud is even out there. It can take some many different

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forms that it is important as an accountant to be aware of it. I hope over the course of the paper

the people reading it have a better understanding of it as well.

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Accounting homework help

This case was prepared by Senior Lecturer Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, MBA 2015, and Cate Reavis, Associate Director,
Curriculum Development.

Copyright © 2015, Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San
Francisco, California 94105, USA.

15-164
Revised March 27, 2018

Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

In the June 7-8, 2014 weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal, an article entitled “Accounting Errors
Hit Hertz Hard” caught auto industry analyst Abby Devins’s attention. Devins recalled that Hertz had
hinted in March about the possibility of having to restate its 2011 financial statements, but by June the
situation appeared worse than previously anticipated. “Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.,” read the article,
“would have to restate and correct results from the past three years, according to a regulatory filing
Friday that indicated more widespread accounting problems at the auto-rental company than had been
thought.”1 The article also mentioned that Hertz’s stock had closed down about 9% in Friday’s trading.

Keenly aware that car rental companies like Hertz provided a significant source of steady demand for
automotive manufacturers, Devins was curious whether Hertz’s accounting issues could be related in
some way to its large rental fleet and what impact this might have on the company’s future vehicle
acquisition plans.

Car Rental Industry

As of 2013, the U.S. car rental industry totaled approximately $36 billion in revenue, which was divided
between leisure travelers, business travelers, and leasing, with rentals taking place both at airport and
off-airport locations (Exhibit 1). Since the majority of car rental demand came from leisure and
business travel, the industry suffered during the 2008-09 recession, with revenue growth plummeting
into negative territory (Exhibit 2). Revenue growth resumed, however, as the subsequent economic
recovery began to take hold.

1 Michael Calia, “Accounting Errors Hit Hertz Hard,” The Wall Street Journal, June 7-8, 2014.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 2

Due to a wave of consolidations, three companies dominated the market with a combined 71% market
share — Enterprise Holdings (Enterprise, National, and Alamo brands); Avis Budget Group (Avis,
Budget, and Payless brands); and Hertz Global Holdings (Hertz, Dollar, and Thrifty brands).2

Company Background

History

Hertz’s beginnings trace back to 1918 when 22-year old Walter L. Jacobs launched Rent-a-Car, Inc. in
Chicago, Illinois, with a dozen Model T Fords that he repaired and painted himself. After having
generated $1 million in revenue over five years, Jacobs sold his company to John D. Hertz who renamed
the company in his name and made it a subsidiary of his Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing
Company.

Over the next century, Hertz changed hands several times and was owned on separate occasions by
both General Motors and the Ford Motor Company. In 2005, Hertz was acquired by a trio of private
equity investment companies, which then took the company public in 2006. See Exhibit 3 for a
corporate timeline.

At of the end of 2013, with over 30,000 employees, Hertz had almost 12,000 worldwide car rental
locations, spanning 145 countries, and a rental fleet topping 700,000 cars (524,000 in the U.S. and
179,500 internationally).3

Operations and Financial Performance

After going public in 2006, Hertz grew from a single brand with an on-airport focus on business
travelers to a multi-brand operation.4 The company acquired the $1.5 billion annual revenue business
of Dollar Thrifty in November 2012. Hertz’s addition of the rental brands Dollar Rent A Car and Thrifty
Car created an immediate leadership position in the budget-friendly leisure market. In 2013, Hertz
launched a deep value brand, Firefly, focused on price conscious leisure travelers. That same year,
Hertz expanded into the Chinese car rental market by acquiring a 20% stake in China Auto Rental, the
largest car rental company in China. U.S. and international car rental revenue in 2013 totaled $6.3
billion and $2.4 billion, respectively (Exhibit 4).

Through its Donlen subsidiary, acquired in September 2011, Hertz provided a comprehensive array of
commercial fleet leasing and management services. Donlen leased car and light- to medium-truck
fleets, generally with a minimum 12-month lease term. It also provided additional services during
leases, including fuel purchasing and management, preventative maintenance, repair consultation,
accident management, and telematics-based location and driver performance reporting. Hertz also

2 Zachary Harris, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2015.
3 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc., 2013 Annual Report.
4 Details of Hertz’s operations from Hertz Global Holdings, Inc., 2013 Annual Report.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 3

operated an industrial and construction equipment rental business. Exhibit 5 provides a breakdown of
Hertz’s 2013 revenue by business segment.

Hertz stock more or less mirrored the S&P 500 Index from the end of 2006 until the summer of 2012
when it began to outperform the broader market (Exhibit 6). The pattern of Hertz’s earnings closely
tracked its stock price (Exhibit 7). Company earnings rose between 2006 and 2007 but turned sharply
negative with the 2008 financial crisis as both business and leisure travel slowed. During the ensuing
economic recovery, Hertz’s earnings rebounded, once again entering positive territory in 2011. The
company reported record revenue and EBITDA for 2013.5 Mark Frissora, Hertz Chairman and CEO,
commented on the company’s strong 2013 financial performance on an earnings call with analysts and
investors: “We continue to successfully drive both record revenue and earnings growth by leveraging
industry leading rental car brands, capitalizing on strategic acquisitions, penetrating new markets in
equipment rental, and being relentless on efficiency programs and cost management.”6

Hertz’s 2013 10-K indicated that the company had increased revenue by roughly 30% and more than
doubled net income to common shareholders since 2011. Over this same three-year period, depreciation
averaged around 25% of total expenses. See Exhibit 8 for Hertz’s 2013 income statement. The
relatively high level of depreciation was consistent with the capital intensive nature of Hertz’s
operations. The company’s largest asset in 2012 and 2013 was revenue earning equipment (i.e., cars
and trucks), which comprised in excess of 50% of total assets in both years. See Exhibit 9 for Hertz’s
2013 balance sheet.

Calculating Depreciation

Once an asset like equipment is recorded on the balance sheet, its cost must be transferred over time
from the balance sheet to the income statement and reported as an expense. This process is referred to
as depreciation. Managers have a certain amount of discretion in recording depreciation expense
because of the assumptions that underlie the calculations.

Two estimates are required to compute the amount of depreciation expense for each accounting period:

1. Useful life is the period of time over which an asset is expected to provide economic
benefits to a company, which need not correspond to its physical life.

2. Residual or salvage value is the expected value of an asset at the end of its useful life.

The depreciable base is computed by subtracting the residual value from an asset’s acquisition cost.
This amount is then depreciated over an asset’s useful life. The most common way for allocating
depreciation over an asset’s useful life is the straight-line method. Exhibit 10 provides an example of

5 “Hertz Report Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2013 Results,” Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Press Release, March 18, 2014.
6 Q4 2013 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Earnings Conference Call, March 18, 2014.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 4

depreciation of an automobile with a $50,000 acquisition cost, a $10,000 residual value, and a 5-year
useful life.

The amount of annual depreciation expense for the automobile in this example is $8,000. As this
example also shows, when depreciation is recognized as an expense on the income statement, which
has the effect of reducing retained earnings on the balance sheet, the book value of the corresponding
asset is reduced by an equal amount with a balancing entry in accumulated depreciation, a contra asset
account associated with PP&E.

When an asset is disposed of, any difference between its sale price and net book value is recognized on
the income statement as a gain/loss on sale. In the above example, a loss on sale of $2,500 would result
if the automobile were sold at the end of Year 5 for $7,500, which reflects the fact that its sales price
($7,500) is lower than its net book value ($10,000) at that time.

Depreciation of Rental Fleet

Hertz’s 2013 financial statements included a footnote disclosure that described how the company
accounted for depreciation of revenue earning equipment:

Generally, when revenue earning equipment is acquired, we estimate the period that we will
hold the asset, primarily based on historical measures of the amount of rental activity (e.g.,
automobile mileage and equipment usage) and the targeted age of equipment at the time of
disposal. We also estimate the residual value of the applicable revenue earning equipment at
the expected time of disposal. The residual values for rental vehicles are affected by many
factors, including make, model and options, age, physical condition, mileage, sale location,
time of the year and channel of disposition (e.g., auction, retail, dealer direct). The residual
value for rental equipment is affected by factors which include equipment age and amount of
usage.

Depreciation is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated holding period.
Depreciation rates are reviewed on a quarterly basis based on management’s ongoing
assessment of present and estimated future market conditions, their effect on residual values at
the time of disposal and the estimated holding periods. Market conditions for used vehicle and
equipment sales can also be affected by external factors such as the economy, natural disasters,
fuel prices and incentives offered by manufacturers of new cars. These key factors are
considered when estimating future residual values and assessing depreciation rates. As a result
of this ongoing assessment, we make periodic adjustments to depreciation rates of revenue
earning equipment in response to changing market conditions.7

7 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 5

U.S. GAAP also required Hertz to disclose useful life estimates for its major asset classes. Exhibit 11
provides this information for each year between 2006-13.

Hertz’s car rental fleet comprised program and non-program cars. Program cars were purchased by
rental car companies under repurchase or guaranteed depreciation programs. Under these programs,
automotive manufacturers agreed to repurchase cars at a specified price or guarantee the depreciation
rate on cars during a specified time period. Non-program cars, in contrast, were subject to residual price
risk at the time of disposal. Exhibit 12 shows Hertz’s program cars purchased as a percentage of total
cars purchased for each year between 2006-13 by the U.S. and international operations. Exhibit 13
provides summary data on used car market pricing trends.

Data Collection

To begin her analysis, Devins pulled together Hertz’s revenue earning equipment balances and
associated depreciation expense amounts between 2006-13, doing the same for Avis Budget Group,
Hertz’s main publicly-traded competitor, for comparison purposes (Exhibit 14). As she was putting the
finishing touches on her spreadsheet, Devins contemplated what significance, if any, depreciation
would ultimately have in Hertz’s larger than previously announced accounting issues.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 6

Exhibit 1 U.S. Car Rental Demand by Purpose and Location

Source: Andy Brennan, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2014.

Exhibit 2 Revenue and Growth Trends in U.S. Car Rental Industry

Source: Andy Brennan, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2014.

-8

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

25,000

27,500

30,000

32,500

35,000

37,500

40,000

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Revenue ($ Millions) % Growth

Leisure
43%

Business
35%

Leasing
20%

Car Sharing
2%

Airport –
Leisure

35%

Airport –
Business

30%

Off-Airport
35%

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 7

Exhibit 3 Hertz Timeline8

1918 Rent-a-Car, Inc. founded by Walter L. Jacobs

1923 Jacobs sold company to John D. Hertz, President of Yellow Cab and Yellow Truck and
Coach Manufacturing Company, who renamed business Hertz Drive-Ur-Self System;
Jacobs stayed on to run car rental operations

1926 Yellow Truck sold to General Motors

1953 Omnibus Corporation purchased Hertz from GM and took company public one year later;
Jacobs became Hertz’s first President and served in that position until his retirement in
1960

1975 O.J. Simpson helped bring Hertz name to American households through advertising
campaign that had him running through airport and leaping over counters9

1994 Hertz became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ford Motor Company

2005 Three private equity investment companies, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, The Carlyle Group,
and Merrill Lynch Global Private Equity, purchased Hertz from Ford

2006 Hertz taken public for second time10

Exhibit 4 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Car Rental Revenue ($ Millions)

2011 2012 2013
U.S. Car Rental 4,468.9 4,893.2 6,324.4

International Car Rental 2,471.9 2,268.5 2,382.5

Total Car Rental 6,940.8 7,161.7 8,706.9

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

8 https://www.hertz.com/rentacar/abouthertz/index.jsp?targetPage=CorporateProfile.jsp&c=aboutHertzHistoryView (accessed May 2015).
9 “Q&A with Stuart Elliott,” The New York Times, August 25, 2008.
10 http://www.nasdaq.com/markets/ipos/company/hertz-global-holdings-inc-710494-50741 (accessed May 2015).

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 8

Exhibit 5 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Breakdown of 2013 Revenue by Business Segment

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

Exhibit 6 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Stock Performance

Source: Center for Research in Security Prices.

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

11/16/2006 04/25/2008 09/29/2009 03/04/2011 08/07/2012 01/14/2014

$
P

ri
ce

HTZ S&P 500

U.S. Car
Rental
59%

Int’l Car
Rental
22%

Equip.
Rental
14%

Other
5%

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 9

Exhibit 7 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Earnings Performance

Source: Compustat.

Exhibit 8 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2013 Income Statement ($ Millions)

Year Ended December 31,

2011 2012 2013
Revenues:

Worldwide car rental 6,940.8

7,161.7

8,706.9
Worldwide equipment rental 1,209.5

1,385.4

1,538.0

All other operations 149.0

477.8

527.0
Total revenues 8,299.3

9,024.9

10,771.9

Expenses:

Direct operating 4,573.1

4,806.0

5,752.0
Depreciation of revenue earning equipment and lease charges 1,896.2

2,128.9

2,525.5

Selling, general and administrative 767.7

968.1

1,022.2
Interest expense 699.7

649.9

716.0

Interest income (5.5)

(4.9)

(11.6)
Other (income) expense, net 62.5

35.5

104.7

Total expenses 7,993.7

8,583.5

10,108.8

Income before income taxes 305.6

441.4

663.1
(Provision) benefit for taxes on income (loss) (121.8)

(202.8)

(316.9)

Net income (loss) 183.8

238.6

346.2
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest (19.6)

0.0

0.0

Net income attributable to Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 164.2

238.6

346.2

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc 10-K, December 31, 2013.

0.48
0.82

-3.74

-0.34 -0.12

0.42 0.58
0.82

-5.00

-4.00

-3.00

-2.00

-1.00

0.00

1.00

2.00

2006 2007 2011 2012 2013

E
P

S
$

2008 2009 2010

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 10

Exhibit 9 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2013 Balance Sheet ($ Millions)

December 31,

2012
December 31,

2013

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents 545.5

423.2
Restricted cash and cash equivalents 551.6

859.9

Receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $30.8 and $29.3 1,879.6

1,512.6
Inventories, at lower of cost or market 105.7

92.3

Prepaid expenses and other assets 489.3

717.2
Revenue earning equipment, at cost:

Cars 12,548.8

14,456.6
Less accumulated depreciation (1,850.4)

(2,679.6)

Other equipment 3,240.1

3,512.2
Less accumulated depreciation (1,041.9)

(1,095.8)

Total revenue earning equipment 12,896.6

14,193.4
Property and equipment, at cost:

Land, buildings and leasehold improvements 1,288.8

1,362.1
Service equipment and other 1,261.1

1,257.0

Less accumulated depreciation (1,113.5)

(1,104.8)
Total property and equipment 1,436.4

1,514.3

Other intangible assets, net 4,030.2

3,928.0
Goodwill 1,329.3

1,347.5

Total assets 23,264.3

24,588.2

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Accounts payable 1,003.2

967.9
Accrued liabilities 1,163.1

1,104.7

Accrued taxes 144.6

140.4
Debt 15,448.6

16,309.4

Public liability and property damage 332.2

347.7
Deferred taxes on income 2,686.4

2,947.1

Total liabilities 20,778.1

21,817.2
Equity:

Common stock 4.2

4.5
Additional paid in capital 3,233.9

3,225.9

Accumulated deficit (725.0)

(378.8)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (26.9)

7.1

Treasury stock 0.0

(87.5)
Total equity 2,486.2

2,771.2

Total liabilities and equity 23,264.3

24,588.2

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 11

Exhibit 10 Depreciation Example

PP&E,
Gross

Accumulated
Depreciation

PP&E,

Net

Depreciation

Expense

Year 1 50,000 8,000 42,000 8,000 = (50,000 – 10,000) / 5 years

Year 2 50,000 16,000 34,000 8,000

Year 3 50,000 24,000 26,000 8,000

Year 4 50,000 32,000 18,000 8,000

Year 5 50,000 40,000 10,000 8,000

Exhibit 11 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Useful Life Estimates

Cars
Other

Equipment

2006
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2007
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2008
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2009
4 to 24
months

24 to 108
months

2010
4 to 26
months

24 to 108
months

2011
4 to 26
months

24 to 108
months

2012
4 to 28
months

24 to 108
months

2013
4 to 36
months

24 to 108
months

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 12

Exhibit 12 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Program Cars Purchased as Percentage of Total Cars
Purchased

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
U.S. 61% 42% 55% 48% 54% 45% 19% 18%

International 71% 65% 59% 57% 56% 55% 53% 57%

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks.

Exhibit 13 Manheim Consulting Used Vehicle Value Index

Source: http://www.manheim.com/services/consulting?WT.svl=m_hdr_mnav_services_consulting#monthlyIndex (accessed

May 2015).

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

Jan-95 Jan-97 Jan-99 Jan-01 Jan-03 Jan-05 Jan-07 Jan-09 Jan-11 Jan-13

January 1995 = 100

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 13

Exhibit 14 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. and Avis Budget Group, Inc. Revenue Earning Equipment Data ($ Millions)

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.
Revenue Earning Equipment, Gross 10,876 11,681 10,344 10,788 11,191 12,509 15,789 17,969

Depreciation Expense for Revenue Earning Equipment 1,762 1,906 2,020 1,780 1,747 1,912 2,146 2,408

Gain/Loss on Sale of Revenue Earning Equipment 36 -21 -83 -72 -43 112 97 -37

Income before Taxes 241 389 -1,383 -150 32 306 441 663

Avis Budget Group, Inc.
Revenue Earning Equipment, Gross 8,042 8,496 8,383 6,912 7,557 9,614 10,619 10,993

Depreciation Expense for Revenue Earning Equipment 1,362 1,565 1,639 1,391 1,277 1,395 1,438 1,678

Gain/Loss on Sale of Revenue Earning Equipment 0 40 -7 30 24 234 97 6

Income before Taxes -677 -992 -1,343 -77 72 36 300 97

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks; Avis Budget Group, Inc. 2007-13 10Ks.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 14

Accounting homework help

Case Study Overview:

The airline industry is impacted by changes in its external environment from
political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal factors. These
aren’t controlled directly by the companies in the industry, but the companies
nevertheless might be forced to alter their business models, pricing, revenue, and
cost structures, etc. in response to changing conditions. Knowledge of external
environmental trends can help predict opportunities and risks. Knowledge of ratio
analysis can help assess what is working in a company’s strategy to adapt to
changing conditions.

In this case study, we will look at the

– Financial statements of a couple of different major players in the airline
industry, as well as international routes companies are flying out of the U.S.

The focus will be on knowledge of Excel, practice with Excel functions and
practice creating and using a pivot table, and visualization.

Case Study Resources :

DATA OVERIEW There are two data sources for this project that are included as
resources:

1. Delta_Airlines_Financial_Statements.xlsx
2. Departures_fy_2015_and_2016_Student.xlsx

The data provided includes nonstop commercial traffic traveling between U.S.
airports and international cities. (Caveat: Note that global air travel systems are
comprised of complex, everchanging networks and alliances, and the majority of
international passengers to and from the U.S. make at least one connection before
reaching their final destination—that information is not contained in the data. U.S.
carriers serve some international points only through an international connection;
therefore, it might look as if no U.S. carrier serves a certain international point,
when in fact U.S. carrier traffic is first flowing through a connecting city. Figures
for the U.S. nonstop market share do not necessarily correlate to the total service
provided to that point by all U.S. carriers.)

Case Study Instructions: There are two parts to this case study:

1. Part One involves an analysis of the financial ratios of Delta Airlines over
several years.

2. Part Two involves analyzing travel destinations by carrier, and looking at
trends and factors that could affect the air travel industry.

3.

CASE STUDY: DATA AND ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS

Part One: Ratio Analysis Data Description The Delta Air Lines Inc. data
(Delta_Air_Lines_Financial_Statements.xls) has been provided to you, along
with the computations of the ratios (the formulas are contained in the Excel
worksheet, Ratios.) The workbook includes worksheets for Ratios, Consolidated
Balance Sheet, and Statements of Operations, Cash, and Stockholders’ Equity.

(Note that there are two inventories to consider for the company: Fuel
and expendable parts. The ratios provided ONLY take fuel into account.)

1- Identify each of the following ratios that are provided in the

spreadsheet for the year 2017, and provide an explanation of its
meaning, comparable to other years:

• Current Ratio
• Asset Turnover
• Inventory Turnover
• Debt to Asset Ratio
• Interest Coverage
• Profit Margin
• Return on Assets
• Return on Equity

2. Based on the ratios provided, identify 2-3 questions you might have
about the company’s operations that you would like more information
about if you were an analyst, company manager, or investor

Part Two: Environmental Analysis

The Board of Directors of a major airline is concerned about the possibility of an
economic downturn affecting demand for air travel. Consider that you are a
manager and have been tasked to do an environmental analysis for the industry and
a destination analysis to determine which of the flight destinations are most
popular.

1. Identify some of the questions you might have about the overall
environmental industry trends (political, economic, social, technological,
environmental, and legal, or others). You might include questions such as “What
affects demand?” or “Who is likely to travel the most in the next five years?”
“How are fuel prices determined” or “How can fuel efficiency be improved?”, for
instance.

a. Identify at least one question for each of the environmental factors
(political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal).

b. For at least one of the questions, hypothesize the answers to it, and
identify where you might go to evaluate resources. For instance, if you
asked a question regarding what affects demand, you might hypothesize that
personal income could be a factor, and you might conclude that evaluating
the overall U.S. economy or household income from data on the Bureau of
Economic Analysis site could be valuable information.

2. Open the Excel workbook, Departures_fy_2015_and_2016_Student.xls, and
familiarize yourself with the fields in each of the worksheets

a. Apply your knowledge of Pivot Tables to answer the following questions
based on the data: (See last page for instructions for the Pivot Table)

1- What was the top destination for all carriers from the U.S. in the
Year 2016 and how many total departures for that destination were
there?

2- What was the top destination for all carriers from the U.S. in the
Year 2016 and how many total departures for that destination were
there?

3- What was the top destination for ONLY Delta Air Lines, Inc.,
United Airlines, and American Airlines from the U.S. in the Year
2016 and how many combined total departures for that destination
were there?

Accounting homework help

1

Name Md Sanowar Khan


Training Program Title: Joyful Bakers Company Training.

Training Specialist/Designer:

Pre-training

In pre-training, we need to engage the learners fully and secure their attention to set the pace for the other phases. At first, the training will be communicated through memos, social media pages, and workers groups to make sure every employee is reached out. After the official communication, the learners need to be motivated and excited about the new program (Joshi et al.,2020). To engage the learner’s needs setting clear learning goals, making learning convenient, rewarding learners for their engagement, and creating open communication channels between the learners and the trainers. The learners must register early in advance after receiving the training call, venue and dates. The earlier the registration, the higher the reward.

Additionally, the learners are encouraged to research the subject of the training so that they can contribute and answer related questions.

Other materials needed to accomplish the training are notepads, questionnaires to be filled, and audiovisual equipment to foster demonstrations. Trainees must also have a set of questions related to the topic for more understanding (Joshi et al.,2020). Additionally, electronic gadgets such as phones and laptops can also be used for recording and research activities.

Learning Event

Time

Training Event

Objectives

Assessment

9:00 am – 9:30 am

Welcoming the trainees.

Appreciation for participation note.

Guest introduction.

Introduction of the objectives.

A brief overview of the session.

Introduction of the new strategy.

We are addressing the weaknesses of joyful baker’s company.

Employees training and engagement. Teamwork simulation.

We are assessing the existing strategy.

Assessing the vulnerabilities and weaknesses.

9:30 am – 10:00 am

Introducing the training technique.

Engaging the trainee in the topic discussion.

Introducing audiovisual presentation of concept maps.

Internet research through personal gadgets.

Personal training while answering individual questions.

Discussion stage.

Trainee participation.

Question and answer stage.

10:00am-10:30 am

Short break

Snacks and mid-day tea.

Trainee interaction.

Building interpersonal interaction.

10:30am-11:30 am

Answering individual questions.

Issuing a new strategy.

From the trainee research, any questions will be discussed.

Discussing the new strategy.

Fixing the vulnerabilities and weaknesses from the previous strategy.

Assessing the new strategy.

11:30 am-12.30 am

Closing up and refreshments.

Guest leaving at their pleasure.

Closing remarks from the instructor.

Offering Refreshments.

Clarifying any underlying question. Vote of thanks to the participants.

Post-Training

After training, the trainees need to be assessed based on the training objectives. The assessment will be done in self-assessment questionnaires. Informal feedback through a personal instructor channel and focusing on peer groups will highly be appreciated (Nahshan et al., 2021). Other assessments will be done to work through observation and actual job key performance monitoring to ensure the new strategies are tracked.

The effectiveness of the training must be gauged to know if it’s meeting the goals. The instructor will use performance metrics, learner outcome, and process measures in this case. Learner outcome entails a thorough observation of the trainees to ensure their productivity and customer services have increased (Nahshan et al., 2021). It will be done through test scores, job satisfaction, and customer feedback review. Alternatively, the instructor will engage the trainee on their satisfaction with the training and participation engagement in the session; this will also help gauge the training session quality.

Concept Map/Curriculum Road Map/Storyboard

There is a close transition of objectives from the previous recommendations. The main goal is to improve the sales and profitability index while upgrading customer services for a better image.

· Advanced management.

· Employees’ training recommendation.

· Building customer relationships.

Training session objectives;

· Solving the weaknesses and vulnerabilities to leas with the objectives.

· Training and employee engagement.

· New strategy implementation.

· Follow up to ensure improvement.

References :

Joshi, M., Chen, D., Liu, Y., Weld, D. S., Zettlemoyer, L., & Levy, O. (2020). Spanbert: Improving pre-training by representing and predicting spans. Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics8, 64-77.

Nahshan, Y., Chmiel, B., Baskin, C., Zheltonozhskii, E., Banner, R., Bronstein, A. M., & Mendelson, A. (2021). Loss aware post-training quantization. Machine Learning110(11), 3245-3262.

Accounting homework help

CU_Horiz_RGB

CU_Horiz_RGB

Financial Accounting Principles

Assessment 2: Adjusting Entries, Inventory, and Cost of Goods Sold

Use this worksheet to complete the following two exercises for Assessment 2. Refer to the instructions in the course for submitting your assessment.

Exercise 2-1

For this exercise, use the following fiscal year-end unadjusted trial balance for the Bigelow Company.

Note: Rent and salary expenses are divided equally between general/administrative and selling activities. Bigelow uses a perpetual inventory system.

BIGELOW COMPANY

Unadjusted Trial Balance

April 30, 2012 (Fiscal year-end)

Debit

Credit

Cash

$2,150

Merchandise inventory

12,100

Store supplies

4,600

Prepaid insurance

2,100

Store equipment

42,350

Accumulated depreciation—Store equipment

$12,000

Accounts payable

8,700

Common stock

4,500

Retained earnings

25,400

Dividends

1,800

Sales

108,500

Sales discounts

950

Sales returns and allowances

1,750

Cost of goods sold

36,300

Depreciation expense—Store equipment

0

Salaries expense

32,500

Insurance expense

0

Rent expense

13,800

Store supplies expense

0

Advertising expense

8,700

_______

Totals

$159,100

$159,100

Prepare adjusting journal entries for the following:

$1,700 of store supplies remaining at the end of the fiscal year.

$1,800 of expired insurance for the fiscal year (administrative expense).

$1,250 depreciation expense on store equipment for the fiscal year (selling expense).

$11,200 of merchandise inventory remaining at the end of the fiscal year (based on a physical count to estimate shrinkage).

Adjustment (a):

Adjustment (b):

Adjustment (c):

Adjustment (d):

Prepare a fiscal year 2012 multiple-step income statement. For distinguished performance, prepare both multiple- and single-step income statements.

BIGELOW COMPANY

Income Statement

For Year Ended April 30, 2011

[Create the 2011 multiple-step income statement here.]

Prepare a fiscal year 2012 single-step income statement.

BIGELOW COMPANY

Income Statement

For Year Ended April 30, 2011

[Create the 2011 single-step income statement here.]

Compute the following ratios as of April 30, 2012.

Current ratio.

Acid test ratio.

[Compute the ratios here.]

For distinguished performance, compute the gross margin ratio.

[Compute the ratio here.]

Exercise 2-2

The following A. B. Murphy Company data show purchase and sales transactions for the month of April. A. B. Murphy uses a perpetual inventory system.

Date

Activities

Units Purchased
(at cost)

Units Sold
(at retail)

Apr 1

Beginning inventory

065 units @ $40/unit

Apr 8

Purchase

225 units @ $45/unit

Apr 12

Sales

235 units @ 75/unit

Apr 19

Purchase

050 units @ $50/unit

Apr 23

Purchase

125 units @ $55/unit

0

Apr 27

Sales

________

95 units @ 80/unit

Totals

465 units

330 units

Compute the following:

Cost of (1) goods available for sale and (2) number of units for sale.

Number of units in ending inventory.

Cost assigned to ending inventory, using any three of the following four methods. Compute costs using all four methods for distinguished performance. Round per unit costs to three decimal places and inventory balances to the nearest dollar.

FIFO.

LIFO.

Weighted average.

Specific identification (see note below).

FIFO Perpetual

Date

Goods Purchased

Cost of Goods Sold

Inventory Balance

LIFO Perpetual

Date

Goods Purchased

Cost of Goods Sold

Inventory Balance

Weighted Average Perpetual

Date

Goods Purchased

Cost of Goods Sold

Inventory Balance

Specific Identification

Note: The April 12 sale comprised 55 units from beginning inventory and 180 units from the April 8 purchase. The April 27 sale comprised 30 units from the April 19 purchase and 65 units from the April 23 purchase.

Date

Goods Purchased

Cost of Goods Sold

Inventory Balance

Gross profit, using FIFO, LIFO, weighted average, and specific identification.

FIFO

LIFO

Weighted

Average

Specific

Identifi-cation

1

Accounting homework help

expansion
by Xxx Ccc

Submission date: 01-May-2022 02:40PM (UTC+0300)
Submission ID: 1825173627
File name: International_Expansion.edited.docx (22.22K)
Word count: 1028
Character count: 5159

1

2

4

3

5

6

9%
SIMILARITY INDEX

5%
INTERNET SOURCES

4%
PUBLICATIONS

5%
STUDENT PAPERS

1 2%
2 2%

3 2%

4 1%
5 1%
6 1%

Exclude quotes On

Exclude bibliography On

Exclude matches Off

expansion
ORIGINALITY REPORT

PRIMARY SOURCES

actionprgroup.com
Internet Source

Submitted to Management Development
Institute Of Singapore
Student Paper

Submitted to Manchester Metropolitan
University
Student Paper

Submitted to American University in Cairo
Student Paper

www.sealifebase.ca
Internet Source

“United Arab Emirates”, Our World, 2020
Publication

Accounting homework help

This case was prepared by Senior Lecturer Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, MBA 2015, and Cate Reavis, Associate Director,
Curriculum Development.

Copyright © 2015, Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San
Francisco, California 94105, USA.

15-164
Revised March 27, 2018

Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

In the June 7-8, 2014 weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal, an article entitled “Accounting Errors
Hit Hertz Hard” caught auto industry analyst Abby Devins’s attention. Devins recalled that Hertz had
hinted in March about the possibility of having to restate its 2011 financial statements, but by June the
situation appeared worse than previously anticipated. “Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.,” read the article,
“would have to restate and correct results from the past three years, according to a regulatory filing
Friday that indicated more widespread accounting problems at the auto-rental company than had been
thought.”1 The article also mentioned that Hertz’s stock had closed down about 9% in Friday’s trading.

Keenly aware that car rental companies like Hertz provided a significant source of steady demand for
automotive manufacturers, Devins was curious whether Hertz’s accounting issues could be related in
some way to its large rental fleet and what impact this might have on the company’s future vehicle
acquisition plans.

Car Rental Industry

As of 2013, the U.S. car rental industry totaled approximately $36 billion in revenue, which was divided
between leisure travelers, business travelers, and leasing, with rentals taking place both at airport and
off-airport locations (Exhibit 1). Since the majority of car rental demand came from leisure and
business travel, the industry suffered during the 2008-09 recession, with revenue growth plummeting
into negative territory (Exhibit 2). Revenue growth resumed, however, as the subsequent economic
recovery began to take hold.

1 Michael Calia, “Accounting Errors Hit Hertz Hard,” The Wall Street Journal, June 7-8, 2014.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 2

Due to a wave of consolidations, three companies dominated the market with a combined 71% market
share — Enterprise Holdings (Enterprise, National, and Alamo brands); Avis Budget Group (Avis,
Budget, and Payless brands); and Hertz Global Holdings (Hertz, Dollar, and Thrifty brands).2

Company Background

History

Hertz’s beginnings trace back to 1918 when 22-year old Walter L. Jacobs launched Rent-a-Car, Inc. in
Chicago, Illinois, with a dozen Model T Fords that he repaired and painted himself. After having
generated $1 million in revenue over five years, Jacobs sold his company to John D. Hertz who renamed
the company in his name and made it a subsidiary of his Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing
Company.

Over the next century, Hertz changed hands several times and was owned on separate occasions by
both General Motors and the Ford Motor Company. In 2005, Hertz was acquired by a trio of private
equity investment companies, which then took the company public in 2006. See Exhibit 3 for a
corporate timeline.

At of the end of 2013, with over 30,000 employees, Hertz had almost 12,000 worldwide car rental
locations, spanning 145 countries, and a rental fleet topping 700,000 cars (524,000 in the U.S. and
179,500 internationally).3

Operations and Financial Performance

After going public in 2006, Hertz grew from a single brand with an on-airport focus on business
travelers to a multi-brand operation.4 The company acquired the $1.5 billion annual revenue business
of Dollar Thrifty in November 2012. Hertz’s addition of the rental brands Dollar Rent A Car and Thrifty
Car created an immediate leadership position in the budget-friendly leisure market. In 2013, Hertz
launched a deep value brand, Firefly, focused on price conscious leisure travelers. That same year,
Hertz expanded into the Chinese car rental market by acquiring a 20% stake in China Auto Rental, the
largest car rental company in China. U.S. and international car rental revenue in 2013 totaled $6.3
billion and $2.4 billion, respectively (Exhibit 4).

Through its Donlen subsidiary, acquired in September 2011, Hertz provided a comprehensive array of
commercial fleet leasing and management services. Donlen leased car and light- to medium-truck
fleets, generally with a minimum 12-month lease term. It also provided additional services during
leases, including fuel purchasing and management, preventative maintenance, repair consultation,
accident management, and telematics-based location and driver performance reporting. Hertz also

2 Zachary Harris, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2015.
3 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc., 2013 Annual Report.
4 Details of Hertz’s operations from Hertz Global Holdings, Inc., 2013 Annual Report.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 3

operated an industrial and construction equipment rental business. Exhibit 5 provides a breakdown of
Hertz’s 2013 revenue by business segment.

Hertz stock more or less mirrored the S&P 500 Index from the end of 2006 until the summer of 2012
when it began to outperform the broader market (Exhibit 6). The pattern of Hertz’s earnings closely
tracked its stock price (Exhibit 7). Company earnings rose between 2006 and 2007 but turned sharply
negative with the 2008 financial crisis as both business and leisure travel slowed. During the ensuing
economic recovery, Hertz’s earnings rebounded, once again entering positive territory in 2011. The
company reported record revenue and EBITDA for 2013.5 Mark Frissora, Hertz Chairman and CEO,
commented on the company’s strong 2013 financial performance on an earnings call with analysts and
investors: “We continue to successfully drive both record revenue and earnings growth by leveraging
industry leading rental car brands, capitalizing on strategic acquisitions, penetrating new markets in
equipment rental, and being relentless on efficiency programs and cost management.”6

Hertz’s 2013 10-K indicated that the company had increased revenue by roughly 30% and more than
doubled net income to common shareholders since 2011. Over this same three-year period, depreciation
averaged around 25% of total expenses. See Exhibit 8 for Hertz’s 2013 income statement. The
relatively high level of depreciation was consistent with the capital intensive nature of Hertz’s
operations. The company’s largest asset in 2012 and 2013 was revenue earning equipment (i.e., cars
and trucks), which comprised in excess of 50% of total assets in both years. See Exhibit 9 for Hertz’s
2013 balance sheet.

Calculating Depreciation

Once an asset like equipment is recorded on the balance sheet, its cost must be transferred over time
from the balance sheet to the income statement and reported as an expense. This process is referred to
as depreciation. Managers have a certain amount of discretion in recording depreciation expense
because of the assumptions that underlie the calculations.

Two estimates are required to compute the amount of depreciation expense for each accounting period:

1. Useful life is the period of time over which an asset is expected to provide economic
benefits to a company, which need not correspond to its physical life.

2. Residual or salvage value is the expected value of an asset at the end of its useful life.

The depreciable base is computed by subtracting the residual value from an asset’s acquisition cost.
This amount is then depreciated over an asset’s useful life. The most common way for allocating
depreciation over an asset’s useful life is the straight-line method. Exhibit 10 provides an example of

5 “Hertz Report Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2013 Results,” Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Press Release, March 18, 2014.
6 Q4 2013 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Earnings Conference Call, March 18, 2014.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 4

depreciation of an automobile with a $50,000 acquisition cost, a $10,000 residual value, and a 5-year
useful life.

The amount of annual depreciation expense for the automobile in this example is $8,000. As this
example also shows, when depreciation is recognized as an expense on the income statement, which
has the effect of reducing retained earnings on the balance sheet, the book value of the corresponding
asset is reduced by an equal amount with a balancing entry in accumulated depreciation, a contra asset
account associated with PP&E.

When an asset is disposed of, any difference between its sale price and net book value is recognized on
the income statement as a gain/loss on sale. In the above example, a loss on sale of $2,500 would result
if the automobile were sold at the end of Year 5 for $7,500, which reflects the fact that its sales price
($7,500) is lower than its net book value ($10,000) at that time.

Depreciation of Rental Fleet

Hertz’s 2013 financial statements included a footnote disclosure that described how the company
accounted for depreciation of revenue earning equipment:

Generally, when revenue earning equipment is acquired, we estimate the period that we will
hold the asset, primarily based on historical measures of the amount of rental activity (e.g.,
automobile mileage and equipment usage) and the targeted age of equipment at the time of
disposal. We also estimate the residual value of the applicable revenue earning equipment at
the expected time of disposal. The residual values for rental vehicles are affected by many
factors, including make, model and options, age, physical condition, mileage, sale location,
time of the year and channel of disposition (e.g., auction, retail, dealer direct). The residual
value for rental equipment is affected by factors which include equipment age and amount of
usage.

Depreciation is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated holding period.
Depreciation rates are reviewed on a quarterly basis based on management’s ongoing
assessment of present and estimated future market conditions, their effect on residual values at
the time of disposal and the estimated holding periods. Market conditions for used vehicle and
equipment sales can also be affected by external factors such as the economy, natural disasters,
fuel prices and incentives offered by manufacturers of new cars. These key factors are
considered when estimating future residual values and assessing depreciation rates. As a result
of this ongoing assessment, we make periodic adjustments to depreciation rates of revenue
earning equipment in response to changing market conditions.7

7 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 5

U.S. GAAP also required Hertz to disclose useful life estimates for its major asset classes. Exhibit 11
provides this information for each year between 2006-13.

Hertz’s car rental fleet comprised program and non-program cars. Program cars were purchased by
rental car companies under repurchase or guaranteed depreciation programs. Under these programs,
automotive manufacturers agreed to repurchase cars at a specified price or guarantee the depreciation
rate on cars during a specified time period. Non-program cars, in contrast, were subject to residual price
risk at the time of disposal. Exhibit 12 shows Hertz’s program cars purchased as a percentage of total
cars purchased for each year between 2006-13 by the U.S. and international operations. Exhibit 13
provides summary data on used car market pricing trends.

Data Collection

To begin her analysis, Devins pulled together Hertz’s revenue earning equipment balances and
associated depreciation expense amounts between 2006-13, doing the same for Avis Budget Group,
Hertz’s main publicly-traded competitor, for comparison purposes (Exhibit 14). As she was putting the
finishing touches on her spreadsheet, Devins contemplated what significance, if any, depreciation
would ultimately have in Hertz’s larger than previously announced accounting issues.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 6

Exhibit 1 U.S. Car Rental Demand by Purpose and Location

Source: Andy Brennan, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2014.

Exhibit 2 Revenue and Growth Trends in U.S. Car Rental Industry

Source: Andy Brennan, “IBISWorld Industry Report – Car Rental in the US,” February 2014.

-8

-6

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

25,000

27,500

30,000

32,500

35,000

37,500

40,000

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Revenue ($ Millions) % Growth

Leisure
43%

Business
35%

Leasing
20%

Car Sharing
2%

Airport –
Leisure

35%

Airport –
Business

30%

Off-Airport
35%

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 7

Exhibit 3 Hertz Timeline8

1918 Rent-a-Car, Inc. founded by Walter L. Jacobs

1923 Jacobs sold company to John D. Hertz, President of Yellow Cab and Yellow Truck and
Coach Manufacturing Company, who renamed business Hertz Drive-Ur-Self System;
Jacobs stayed on to run car rental operations

1926 Yellow Truck sold to General Motors

1953 Omnibus Corporation purchased Hertz from GM and took company public one year later;
Jacobs became Hertz’s first President and served in that position until his retirement in
1960

1975 O.J. Simpson helped bring Hertz name to American households through advertising
campaign that had him running through airport and leaping over counters9

1994 Hertz became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ford Motor Company

2005 Three private equity investment companies, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, The Carlyle Group,
and Merrill Lynch Global Private Equity, purchased Hertz from Ford

2006 Hertz taken public for second time10

Exhibit 4 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Car Rental Revenue ($ Millions)

2011 2012 2013
U.S. Car Rental 4,468.9 4,893.2 6,324.4

International Car Rental 2,471.9 2,268.5 2,382.5

Total Car Rental 6,940.8 7,161.7 8,706.9

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

8 https://www.hertz.com/rentacar/abouthertz/index.jsp?targetPage=CorporateProfile.jsp&c=aboutHertzHistoryView (accessed May 2015).
9 “Q&A with Stuart Elliott,” The New York Times, August 25, 2008.
10 http://www.nasdaq.com/markets/ipos/company/hertz-global-holdings-inc-710494-50741 (accessed May 2015).

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 8

Exhibit 5 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Breakdown of 2013 Revenue by Business Segment

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

Exhibit 6 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Stock Performance

Source: Center for Research in Security Prices.

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

11/16/2006 04/25/2008 09/29/2009 03/04/2011 08/07/2012 01/14/2014

$
P

ri
ce

HTZ S&P 500

U.S. Car
Rental
59%

Int’l Car
Rental
22%

Equip.
Rental
14%

Other
5%

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 9

Exhibit 7 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Earnings Performance

Source: Compustat.

Exhibit 8 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2013 Income Statement ($ Millions)

Year Ended December 31,

2011 2012 2013
Revenues:

Worldwide car rental 6,940.8

7,161.7

8,706.9
Worldwide equipment rental 1,209.5

1,385.4

1,538.0

All other operations 149.0

477.8

527.0
Total revenues 8,299.3

9,024.9

10,771.9

Expenses:

Direct operating 4,573.1

4,806.0

5,752.0
Depreciation of revenue earning equipment and lease charges 1,896.2

2,128.9

2,525.5

Selling, general and administrative 767.7

968.1

1,022.2
Interest expense 699.7

649.9

716.0

Interest income (5.5)

(4.9)

(11.6)
Other (income) expense, net 62.5

35.5

104.7

Total expenses 7,993.7

8,583.5

10,108.8

Income before income taxes 305.6

441.4

663.1
(Provision) benefit for taxes on income (loss) (121.8)

(202.8)

(316.9)

Net income (loss) 183.8

238.6

346.2
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest (19.6)

0.0

0.0

Net income attributable to Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 164.2

238.6

346.2

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc 10-K, December 31, 2013.

0.48
0.82

-3.74

-0.34 -0.12

0.42 0.58
0.82

-5.00

-4.00

-3.00

-2.00

-1.00

0.00

1.00

2.00

2006 2007 2011 2012 2013

E
P

S
$

2008 2009 2010

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 10

Exhibit 9 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2013 Balance Sheet ($ Millions)

December 31,

2012
December 31,

2013

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents 545.5

423.2
Restricted cash and cash equivalents 551.6

859.9

Receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $30.8 and $29.3 1,879.6

1,512.6
Inventories, at lower of cost or market 105.7

92.3

Prepaid expenses and other assets 489.3

717.2
Revenue earning equipment, at cost:

Cars 12,548.8

14,456.6
Less accumulated depreciation (1,850.4)

(2,679.6)

Other equipment 3,240.1

3,512.2
Less accumulated depreciation (1,041.9)

(1,095.8)

Total revenue earning equipment 12,896.6

14,193.4
Property and equipment, at cost:

Land, buildings and leasehold improvements 1,288.8

1,362.1
Service equipment and other 1,261.1

1,257.0

Less accumulated depreciation (1,113.5)

(1,104.8)
Total property and equipment 1,436.4

1,514.3

Other intangible assets, net 4,030.2

3,928.0
Goodwill 1,329.3

1,347.5

Total assets 23,264.3

24,588.2

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Accounts payable 1,003.2

967.9
Accrued liabilities 1,163.1

1,104.7

Accrued taxes 144.6

140.4
Debt 15,448.6

16,309.4

Public liability and property damage 332.2

347.7
Deferred taxes on income 2,686.4

2,947.1

Total liabilities 20,778.1

21,817.2
Equity:

Common stock 4.2

4.5
Additional paid in capital 3,233.9

3,225.9

Accumulated deficit (725.0)

(378.8)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (26.9)

7.1

Treasury stock 0.0

(87.5)
Total equity 2,486.2

2,771.2

Total liabilities and equity 23,264.3

24,588.2

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 10-K, December 31, 2013.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 11

Exhibit 10 Depreciation Example

PP&E,
Gross

Accumulated
Depreciation

PP&E,

Net

Depreciation

Expense

Year 1 50,000 8,000 42,000 8,000 = (50,000 – 10,000) / 5 years

Year 2 50,000 16,000 34,000 8,000

Year 3 50,000 24,000 26,000 8,000

Year 4 50,000 32,000 18,000 8,000

Year 5 50,000 40,000 10,000 8,000

Exhibit 11 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. Useful Life Estimates

Cars
Other

Equipment

2006
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2007
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2008
5 to 16
months

24 to 108
months

2009
4 to 24
months

24 to 108
months

2010
4 to 26
months

24 to 108
months

2011
4 to 26
months

24 to 108
months

2012
4 to 28
months

24 to 108
months

2013
4 to 36
months

24 to 108
months

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 12

Exhibit 12 Hertz Globing Holdings, Inc. Program Cars Purchased as Percentage of Total Cars
Purchased

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
U.S. 61% 42% 55% 48% 54% 45% 19% 18%

International 71% 65% 59% 57% 56% 55% 53% 57%

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks.

Exhibit 13 Manheim Consulting Used Vehicle Value Index

Source: http://www.manheim.com/services/consulting?WT.svl=m_hdr_mnav_services_consulting#monthlyIndex (accessed

May 2015).

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

Jan-95 Jan-97 Jan-99 Jan-01 Jan-03 Jan-05 Jan-07 Jan-09 Jan-11 Jan-13

January 1995 = 100

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 13

Exhibit 14 Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. and Avis Budget Group, Inc. Revenue Earning Equipment Data ($ Millions)

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.
Revenue Earning Equipment, Gross 10,876 11,681 10,344 10,788 11,191 12,509 15,789 17,969

Depreciation Expense for Revenue Earning Equipment 1,762 1,906 2,020 1,780 1,747 1,912 2,146 2,408

Gain/Loss on Sale of Revenue Earning Equipment 36 -21 -83 -72 -43 112 97 -37

Income before Taxes 241 389 -1,383 -150 32 306 441 663

Avis Budget Group, Inc.
Revenue Earning Equipment, Gross 8,042 8,496 8,383 6,912 7,557 9,614 10,619 10,993

Depreciation Expense for Revenue Earning Equipment 1,362 1,565 1,639 1,391 1,277 1,395 1,438 1,678

Gain/Loss on Sale of Revenue Earning Equipment 0 40 -7 30 24 234 97 6

Income before Taxes -677 -992 -1,343 -77 72 36 300 97

Source: Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. 2007-13 10-Ks; Avis Budget Group, Inc. 2007-13 10Ks.

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS, INC.
Christopher Noe, Lauren Pully, and Cate Reavis

Rev. March 27, 2018 14

Accounting homework help

Case Study Overview:

The airline industry is impacted by changes in its external environment from
political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal factors. These
aren’t controlled directly by the companies in the industry, but the companies
nevertheless might be forced to alter their business models, pricing, revenue, and
cost structures, etc. in response to changing conditions. Knowledge of external
environmental trends can help predict opportunities and risks. Knowledge of ratio
analysis can help assess what is working in a company’s strategy to adapt to
changing conditions.

In this case study, we will look at the

– Financial statements of a couple of different major players in the airline
industry, as well as international routes companies are flying out of the U.S.

The focus will be on knowledge of Excel, practice with Excel functions and
practice creating and using a pivot table, and visualization.

Case Study Resources :

DATA OVERIEW There are two data sources for this project that are included as
resources:

1. Delta_Airlines_Financial_Statements.xlsx
2. Departures_fy_2015_and_2016_Student.xlsx

The data provided includes nonstop commercial traffic traveling between U.S.
airports and international cities. (Caveat: Note that global air travel systems are
comprised of complex, everchanging networks and alliances, and the majority of
international passengers to and from the U.S. make at least one connection before
reaching their final destination—that information is not contained in the data. U.S.
carriers serve some international points only through an international connection;
therefore, it might look as if no U.S. carrier serves a certain international point,
when in fact U.S. carrier traffic is first flowing through a connecting city. Figures
for the U.S. nonstop market share do not necessarily correlate to the total service
provided to that point by all U.S. carriers.)

Case Study Instructions: There are two parts to this case study:

1. Part One involves an analysis of the financial ratios of Delta Airlines over
several years.

2. Part Two involves analyzing travel destinations by carrier, and looking at
trends and factors that could affect the air travel industry.

3.

CASE STUDY: DATA AND ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS

Part One: Ratio Analysis Data Description The Delta Air Lines Inc. data
(Delta_Air_Lines_Financial_Statements.xls) has been provided to you, along
with the computations of the ratios (the formulas are contained in the Excel
worksheet, Ratios.) The workbook includes worksheets for Ratios, Consolidated
Balance Sheet, and Statements of Operations, Cash, and Stockholders’ Equity.

(Note that there are two inventories to consider for the company: Fuel
and expendable parts. The ratios provided ONLY take fuel into account.)

1- Identify each of the following ratios that are provided in the

spreadsheet for the year 2017, and provide an explanation of its
meaning, comparable to other years:

• Current Ratio
• Asset Turnover
• Inventory Turnover
• Debt to Asset Ratio
• Interest Coverage
• Profit Margin
• Return on Assets
• Return on Equity

2. Based on the ratios provided, identify 2-3 questions you might have
about the company’s operations that you would like more information
about if you were an analyst, company manager, or investor

Part Two: Environmental Analysis

The Board of Directors of a major airline is concerned about the possibility of an
economic downturn affecting demand for air travel. Consider that you are a
manager and have been tasked to do an environmental analysis for the industry and
a destination analysis to determine which of the flight destinations are most
popular.

1. Identify some of the questions you might have about the overall
environmental industry trends (political, economic, social, technological,
environmental, and legal, or others). You might include questions such as “What
affects demand?” or “Who is likely to travel the most in the next five years?”
“How are fuel prices determined” or “How can fuel efficiency be improved?”, for
instance.

a. Identify at least one question for each of the environmental factors
(political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal).

b. For at least one of the questions, hypothesize the answers to it, and
identify where you might go to evaluate resources. For instance, if you
asked a question regarding what affects demand, you might hypothesize that
personal income could be a factor, and you might conclude that evaluating
the overall U.S. economy or household income from data on the Bureau of
Economic Analysis site could be valuable information.

2. Open the Excel workbook, Departures_fy_2015_and_2016_Student.xls, and
familiarize yourself with the fields in each of the worksheets

a. Apply your knowledge of Pivot Tables to answer the following questions
based on the data: (See last page for instructions for the Pivot Table)

1- What was the top destination for all carriers from the U.S. in the
Year 2016 and how many total departures for that destination were
there?

2- What was the top destination for all carriers from the U.S. in the
Year 2016 and how many total departures for that destination were
there?

3- What was the top destination for ONLY Delta Air Lines, Inc.,
United Airlines, and American Airlines from the U.S. in the Year
2016 and how many combined total departures for that destination
were there?

Accounting homework help

1

Name Md Sanowar Khan


Training Program Title: Joyful Bakers Company Training.

Training Specialist/Designer:

Pre-training

In pre-training, we need to engage the learners fully and secure their attention to set the pace for the other phases. At first, the training will be communicated through memos, social media pages, and workers groups to make sure every employee is reached out. After the official communication, the learners need to be motivated and excited about the new program (Joshi et al.,2020). To engage the learner’s needs setting clear learning goals, making learning convenient, rewarding learners for their engagement, and creating open communication channels between the learners and the trainers. The learners must register early in advance after receiving the training call, venue and dates. The earlier the registration, the higher the reward.

Additionally, the learners are encouraged to research the subject of the training so that they can contribute and answer related questions.

Other materials needed to accomplish the training are notepads, questionnaires to be filled, and audiovisual equipment to foster demonstrations. Trainees must also have a set of questions related to the topic for more understanding (Joshi et al.,2020). Additionally, electronic gadgets such as phones and laptops can also be used for recording and research activities.

Learning Event

Time

Training Event

Objectives

Assessment

9:00 am – 9:30 am

Welcoming the trainees.

Appreciation for participation note.

Guest introduction.

Introduction of the objectives.

A brief overview of the session.

Introduction of the new strategy.

We are addressing the weaknesses of joyful baker’s company.

Employees training and engagement. Teamwork simulation.

We are assessing the existing strategy.

Assessing the vulnerabilities and weaknesses.

9:30 am – 10:00 am

Introducing the training technique.

Engaging the trainee in the topic discussion.

Introducing audiovisual presentation of concept maps.

Internet research through personal gadgets.

Personal training while answering individual questions.

Discussion stage.

Trainee participation.

Question and answer stage.

10:00am-10:30 am

Short break

Snacks and mid-day tea.

Trainee interaction.

Building interpersonal interaction.

10:30am-11:30 am

Answering individual questions.

Issuing a new strategy.

From the trainee research, any questions will be discussed.

Discussing the new strategy.

Fixing the vulnerabilities and weaknesses from the previous strategy.

Assessing the new strategy.

11:30 am-12.30 am

Closing up and refreshments.

Guest leaving at their pleasure.

Closing remarks from the instructor.

Offering Refreshments.

Clarifying any underlying question. Vote of thanks to the participants.

Post-Training

After training, the trainees need to be assessed based on the training objectives. The assessment will be done in self-assessment questionnaires. Informal feedback through a personal instructor channel and focusing on peer groups will highly be appreciated (Nahshan et al., 2021). Other assessments will be done to work through observation and actual job key performance monitoring to ensure the new strategies are tracked.

The effectiveness of the training must be gauged to know if it’s meeting the goals. The instructor will use performance metrics, learner outcome, and process measures in this case. Learner outcome entails a thorough observation of the trainees to ensure their productivity and customer services have increased (Nahshan et al., 2021). It will be done through test scores, job satisfaction, and customer feedback review. Alternatively, the instructor will engage the trainee on their satisfaction with the training and participation engagement in the session; this will also help gauge the training session quality.

Concept Map/Curriculum Road Map/Storyboard

There is a close transition of objectives from the previous recommendations. The main goal is to improve the sales and profitability index while upgrading customer services for a better image.

· Advanced management.

· Employees’ training recommendation.

· Building customer relationships.

Training session objectives;

· Solving the weaknesses and vulnerabilities to leas with the objectives.

· Training and employee engagement.

· New strategy implementation.

· Follow up to ensure improvement.

References :

Joshi, M., Chen, D., Liu, Y., Weld, D. S., Zettlemoyer, L., & Levy, O. (2020). Spanbert: Improving pre-training by representing and predicting spans. Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics8, 64-77.

Nahshan, Y., Chmiel, B., Baskin, C., Zheltonozhskii, E., Banner, R., Bronstein, A. M., & Mendelson, A. (2021). Loss aware post-training quantization. Machine Learning110(11), 3245-3262.

Accounting homework help

9-100-055
R E V : F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 0 2

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Research Associate Lisa Brem prepared this case under the supervision of Professor V.G. Narayanan. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis
for class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective
management.

Copyright © 2002 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of Harvard Business School.

V . G . N A R A Y A N A N

L I S A B R E M

Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

It was January 1996. José Valderas, divisional vice president for Owens & Minor (O&M), a $3
billion distributor of medical and surgical supplies, was driving back to his Savage, Maryland office.
His mind was processing the news he had just heard. Ideal Health System, a not-for-profit hospital
chain that for the last 10 years had purchased supplies from a rival distributor, announced it was
putting its $30 million annual medical/surgical supply contract up for bid. In an environment where
healthcare consolidations were the norm, resulting in ever-larger contracts that were fewer and
farther between, Ideal would have all the major distribution companies in the region vying for its
business.

In operation for 114 years, O&M was a Fortune 500 company and one of the nation’s largest
distributors of medical and surgical supplies such as gloves, gowns, wound closure devices, and
other operating room items. Through its 49 distribution centers nationwide, O&M warehoused and
delivered over 300,000 products from roughly 3,000 manufacturers to nearly 4,000 hospitals,
integrated health care systems, and group purchasing organizations.

Obtaining and keeping profitable customers was critical for O&M’s survival. Like most medical
and surgical distributors, O&M was feeling squeezed by customer demands for more services and
lower distribution fees. The current pricing methodology—cost-plus—based distributor fees on
product cost, not the actual cost of delivering the product. O&M was struggling to contain its costs
while trying to understand which customers and services were profitable. O&M had ended 1995
with an $11 million loss due to a decrease in gross margin and an increase in expenses. Winning the
Ideal contract would certainly boost O&M’s bottom line—but only if Valderas priced the proposal
appropriately.

Valderas knew that tearing Ideal away from its current supplier, Atlantic Healthcare, would be a
challenge. Atlantic was a subsidiary of a medical supply manufacturer. The high margin from sales
of its parent’s products allowed Atlantic to offer distribution services at extremely low rates—rates
that would force O&M to operate at a loss. Valderas had bid for—and lost—Ideal two years ago to
Atlantic for just that reason. The fact that the business was coming up for bid again gave Valderas
hope that maybe this time Ideal was ready for a change. Valderas explained:

Atlantic could offer low prices. It could undercut us all day long, but the customer was
locked into buying its self-manufactured products. One of the things that made us attractive to
Ideal was that we were brand-neutral. We were a lot more flexible than the other competitors
bidding for this contract. I felt that after 10 years with Atlantic, Ideal was ripe for change. Our
job was to give them a good reason to change to O&M.

This document is authorized for use by Ce Zheng, from 03/14/2022 to 06/10/2022
in the course: SP22 MGTF495-76905: Special Topic in Accounting: Strategic Cost Management & New Technologies (Milone) – MF22, University of California, San Diego

Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.

100-055 Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

2

Spurred by the cost reduction initiatives of its customers and suppliers, O&M had instituted a
logistical consulting division headed by Ed Petrella, and a budgeting, forecasting, and cost
management group directed by Michael Stefanic. Valderas and Petrella had been working with
Stefanic to convert Valderas’ Savage distribution center to a new activity-based cost system.

As Valderas arrived at his office and reviewed the activity cost reports from the prior month, he
was struck by a sudden thought: What if he could use the ABC information, not just to keep his costs
down, but to add value for his customers? After all, Valderas thought, our new costing system made
us more efficient and helped us better understand our customers’ costs. Not only could ABC help
O&M communicate its internal costs to Ideal, it could also be a new way—using activity-based
pricing—to make a proposal.

There were substantial risks involved, however. The existing price structure—cost-plus—was
entrenched in the industry, and ABC ideas were so new that Ideal might not understand an activity-
based pricing system. In addition, Valderas wasn’t entirely sure what such a proposal would look
like. Valderas said:

We had done some work in terms of costing out our processes. Although we had been
doing activity-based costing, we didn’t know how to relate that information to a pricing
methodology for our customers—at least not one that they would accept.

Even so, Valderas believed that an activity-based pricing proposal might be the only way he could
offer a competitive price to Ideal and still reap profits for the company. Valderas picked up his
telephone. The first thing he needed to do was set up a meeting with Ed Petrella, director of logistics
and support services and Michael Stefanic, director of budgeting, forecasting and cost management.

Company Background1

O&M was founded in 1882 by George Gilmer Minor Jr., a wholesale drug salesman from
Richmond, Virginia, who joined forces with competitor and drug salesman Otho Owens. Minor
came from an esteemed family of healthcare practitioners. His great-grandfather had been an
apothecary-surgeon in colonial Williamsburg and his grandfather was Thomas Jefferson’s personal
physician. Owens and Minor operated both a wholesale and a retail business in Richmond, selling
sundries, paints, and window glass as well as filling prescriptions. In the 1920s the Owens family sold
its interest in the company. The Minor family eventually took over the company when George
Gilmer Minor IV became president in 1947.

In 1954 Owens & Minor installed its first computerized order fulfillment system. In the late 1960s,
the company acquired two medical and surgical supply companies: A&J Hospital Supply and Powers
& Anderson. In 1971, the company made its first public offering of stock. Throughout the 1970s, the
company continued to acquire new businesses including Murray Drug, White Surgical Supply and
Southern Hospital, expanding its operations into 10 states.

G. Gilmer Minor, III, became president of O&M in 1981. With the purchase of a portion of G. D.
Searle’s Will Ross subsidiary, the second largest medical and surgical supplier in the United States,
the company increased its presence in the medical and surgical supply industry. In 1984, medical
supplies replaced wholesale drugs as the company’s largest income source. In 1986, the company’s

1 Data Sources for this section: Media General Financial Services distributed by Dow Jones & Company Inc. (15 January 2000);
and Owens & Minor Annual Reports 1990-1995, (Richmond, Owens & Minor, 1990-1995).

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Owens & Minor, Inc. (A) 100-055

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goal was to grow from $367 million in sales to $1billion by the end of 1990 by concentrating on
medical/surgical and wholesale drug sales to hospitals and independent drug stores.

In 1990, the company turned its focus inward. Its new long-term strategy was to improve
margins, productivity, and asset management through a commitment to technology and supply chain
partnerships. It also articulated “an aggressive growth strategy, through acquisitions and internal
expansion, to become the leading low cost distributor of healthcare products.” By 1994, it had sold its
wholesale drug and packaging businesses and had acquired several medical and surgical supply
companies. The largest acquisition—Stuart Medical—increased the company’s presence to 50 states
and brought a much-desired expertise in stockless and just-in-time inventory management systems.
By the end of 1995, still under the leadership of G. Gilmer Minor, III, O&M had become one of the
largest distributors of medical and surgical supplies in the United States. It employed nearly 4,200
people and had grown to almost $3 billion in revenue. The company’s plan for 1996 included
improving service quality and controlling inventory costs. O&M also planned to increase its gross
margin by putting higher prices to services that demanded more resources.

The Medical/Surgical Supply Industry2

Although beset by cost pressures, medical and surgical supply was a growing sector, since
expenditures in the healthcare industry in the United States were expected to continue to rise. The
Health Care Financing Administration estimated that after ranging from 13.5% to 13.7% of gross
domestic product (GDP) in the mid-1990s, healthcare expenditures would account for $2.2 trillion
(16%) of GDP from 1998 through 2002. Healthcare industry growth was tied to demographic trends—
the aging of the U.S. population—and advances in medical technology.

Changes in the medical/surgical supply industry reflected the evolution of U.S. healthcare in
general. As managed care brought attention to costs, health care providers took a number of steps to
reduce expenses, some of them directly affecting the medical supply industry. Several consulting
groups sprang up to help hospitals manage inventory and supply costs. As Ed Petrella, director of
logistic and support services at O&M, described:

Historically, health care providers only had to mark-up the reimbursement they received
from insurance companies or government agencies to make a profit. When the fixed rate
system came in, hospitals had to move from managing their profit margin to managing actual
costs. Material management consultants advised providers to shift their costs to their
distributors. Without paying us more, customers wanted us to carry more of the inventory,
and make more deliveries in lower units of measure. That’s when O&M formed the logistics
group. It was our job to look at the customer’s processes and make them as efficient as
possible to keep our costs down.

In order to share resources, reap economies of scale, and gain more control over supply costs,
hospitals joined forces with other hospitals, outpatient clinics, and long-term care facilities to form
extended provider networks. The consolidations sparked consolidations in suppliers and
distributors as well. Mergers and acquisitions were becoming the norm, threatening to change a
market that had been populated by many small regional players and several large national firms.

2 Primary data source for this section: Robert Gold, “HealthCare: Products & Supplies,” Industry Survey. Available from
Standard & Poor, <http://www.netadvantage.standardpoor.com> (9 February 2000).

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100-055 Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

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As providers solidified their partnerships with other facilities, they formed buying groups that
represented vast numbers of member sites. Sales to Voluntary Hospitals of America (VHA) member
hospitals, O&M’s largest buying-group customer, represented approximately $1.2 billion in annual
revenue, or 41% of net sales, for O&M in 1996. With such combined buying power, these groups
were able to force suppliers and manufacturers to cut margins. As Michael Stefanic, director of
budgets, forecasting and cost management at O&M explained:

Our negotiations with the customer entailed them trying to get our fee down to 6% of the
product price and us trying to get it up to 8%. There would be no discussion of a change in
services; it was simply that whoever had the strongest will would win. When customers
started banding together to form these large integrated healthcare networks, they became more
powerful, and they had a bigger stick to wield. There was always the threat that your
customer could take all their volume to a competitor.

Distributors also experienced margin pressure from the manufacturing side of the supply chain.
In an industry where the margins were already low—one industry trade journal reported that
distributors’ 1993 pre-tax profit was an average of 1.6% even a .5% reduction in discounts could mean
a 31% cut in net profit before taxes. 3

Many distributors struggled financially with these reduced margins. In 1995, unable to meet
contracts calling for lower margins, Owens and Minor instituted an across-the-board 1% price
increase. Although most providers absorbed the increase, O&M lost some business as a result of the
price hikes.

O&M, unlike most other national distributors in the industry, focused solely on distributing
medical and surgical supplies. Most of its competitors maintained other business lines. They were
either supply manufacturers, subsidiaries of manufacturers, or distributors and wholesalers of
pharmaceuticals. Some of O&M’s closest competitors were: Allegiance Corp., a subsidiary of Baxter
International; General Medical, and Bergen Brunswig (see Exhibit 1 for Comparative Financial
Statements).

Bergen Brunswig was a leading drug wholesaler and medical supply distributor. It also
distributed medical equipment, over-the-counter medications, beauty products, and sundries to
independent drugstores and large pharmaceutical chains in the United States. Baxter International
manufactured and distributed a range of heath care products, including blood, circulatory, dialysis,
and intravenous products, and heart surgery equipment. In 1996, Allegiance was in the process of
being spun off from Baxter. General Medical was often characterized as the third largest medical
surgical distributor. Because of its precarious financial picture, posting net losses every year since
1993, the company was ripe for a merger or acquisition. The company was majority owned by Kelso
& Co., a non-health care investment group.4

A few hospitals and buying groups opted for companies that were able to supply them with ‘all-
lines’ distribution—purchasing pharmaceuticals and other healthcare supplies from one distributor
in order to minimize the number of suppliers to manage. O&M, however, chose not to expand into

3 Curt Werner, “J&J Raises Ire of Med-Surg Distributors by Cutting Prompt Payment Discount,” Health Industry Today; Union;
August 1995, p. 2. Available from ProQuest, ABI/Inform. <http:// proquest.umi.com/pbdweb> (9 February, 2000).

4 Anonymous, “Shroud of Financial Secrecy Lifts; General Medical Goes Public,” Health Industry Today; Union; February 1997,
p. 6. Available from ProQuest, ABI/Inform. <http:// proquest.umi.com/pbdweb> (9 February, 2000).

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Owens & Minor, Inc. (A) 100-055

5

other product lines, believing that its focus on medical/surgical supplies would enable it to offer
better products, prices, and services to its customers.

Many of O&M’s competitors offered private label supplies—an area that O&M had decided
would not be part of its strategy. The company’s position was that pushing private labels along with
other manufacturers’ products would compromise its ability to act on behalf of its brand name
suppliers.

Cost-Plus Pricing

The dominant form of pricing in the medical/surgical distribution industry was cost-plus. Cost-
plus meant the customer paid a base manufacturer price plus a mark-up added on by the distributor.
For example, the buying group negotiated with the manufacturer a price of $1.00 per box of
bandages. The distributor added a 7% fee, charging the customer $1.07 for the delivered product.
The percentage was the same regardless of the costs to receive, move, store, and ship the product. As
Valderas explained:

With cost-plus, our fee was based entirely on the price of the product from the
manufacturer to the customer. A large box of adult diapers that cost $30 would generate, on a
cost-plus-7% fee, $2.10 in revenue. In contrast, a small box of cardiovascular sutures that cost
$800 would generate $56 in revenue. There was a huge difference in the cost to handle large
boxes versus small ones. There was not much money in large, bulky packages, but a lot on
small items.

Valderas went on to explain the genesis of cost-plus pricing:

In the 1980s VHA, the nation’s first and largest group purchasing organization, introduced
large-scale cost-plus pricing to the medical/surgical supply industry. Before cost-plus,
distributors used a variety of ways to drive pricing. There were not a lot of prime vendor
agreements, business was fragmented between distributors. VHA changed all that. It drafted
the first national cost-plus distribution agreement. It was a committed contract, which meant
that the member hospitals agreed to commit all their traditionally distributed business to one
distributor. We had one cost-plus fee of 7% for all products. VHA chose O&M as one of its
preferred distributors, which greatly fueled our growth throughout the 1980’s and 1990s.

One drawback to cost-plus for distributors was the potential for customers to engage in “cherry-
picking.” As Petrella explained:

Cost-plus tied our fee to the value of the product rather than the value of the service. To
avoid paying a high distribution percentage on expensive products, the customer would buy
them directly from the manufacturer. That left us with only the low-margin, inexpensive
product. Buying direct wasn’t efficient for the customer either, since the manufacturer would
require them to buy in bulk and they didn’t have the space or management systems in place to
handle the product. Often expensive items were mishandled, damaged, or lost.

Complicating the pricing structure was the fact that distributors and their customers negotiated
separate product prices from manufacturers. Stand-alone distributors like O&M did not set product
prices with their customers, they added their cost-plus percentage to the product price arrived at by
the manufacturer and the customer (see Exhibit 2 for a graphic depiction of the supply chain).

Additional factors affected the actual cost of the product both to the distributor and customer:

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100-055 Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

6

• Manufacturers offered incentives such as distributor discounts. Distributors, by buying in
bulk from manufacturers, could increase their profits by the bulk discounts offered by the
manufacturer.

• Product prices varied from customer to customer, depending on variables such as the amount
of product the customer committed to buy over the life of the contract and whether the
customer was part of a buying group.

• Some products were covered by contract while others were not.

• Hospitals had the option of making off-contract purchases for a different product or from a
different manufacturer.

• Distributors that were part of a manufacturing company that sold private label items could
combine the product price and distribution fee, making it impossible to distinguish between
the two costs.

The complexity of the pricing structure made it difficult for a purchasing manager to track actual
product costs or compare quotes from competing manufacturers and distributors. As Stefanic
explained:

Many distributors will try to sell a customer by saying they will get cost plus 4%. Well,
maybe that’s true for, say, the top 10 items they purchase, but then they’re paying up to cost-
plus 20% for other things—items they don’t track as closely. The result is the customer ends
up paying an average of something like cost-plus 12% and they don’t realize it until two years
later when someone does a cost analysis.

O&M Organizational Structure and Workflow5

O&M maintained a largely decentralized organization with each distribution center operating
as a profit center. O&M located inventory forecasting, purchasing, accounts payable, customer
service, accounts receivable, and warehousing functions in each of its 49 divisions. Divisions served
customers within a 100-mile to 150-mile radius using a fleet of owned and leased trucks. Customers
required an average of two to six deliveries per week. Typical products included disposable gloves,
dressings, endoscopic products, needles, syringes, sterile procedure trays, surgical products and
gowns, urological products and wound closure products. The vast majority—90%—of O&M’s net
sales came from acute care hospitals and hospital-based systems. 6

The distributors purchased and warehoused the inventory until delivery to the customer. Typical
customer contracts with distributors called for 30-day payment terms. In recent years, health care
providers, in an effort to minimize expenses and reduce capital costs, increased their reliance on
distributors to hold inventory. Some hospitals moved to just-in-time or stockless systems. Just-in-
time systems relied on carefully planned replenishment of bulk items, while stockless systems
required distributors to make several shipments per week—or even per day—to the end user. It was
not unusual, in a stockless environment, for a distributor to deliver a box of sutures directly to an
operating room. As Stefanic explained:

5 Primary data source for this section: Owens & Minor, Inc., “Virtual Warehouse Tours,” Owens & Minor, Inc. Web page,
http://www.owens-minor.com/ourbusiness/default/asp (8 February 2000).

6 Owens & Minor, 1998 Annual Report (Richmond: Owens & Minor, 1998).

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Owens & Minor, Inc. (A) 100-055

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One of the services we provide to the supply chain is that we own and manage the
inventory. Few want to take on that risk. Manufacturers want to produce product, sell it, and
then get it out the door. Customers don’t want to buy product until they are ready to use it.
So we manage the inventory flow and we take on the financial risk associated with that
function. For example, product returns can generate significant internal costs for us. Some
manufacturers charge a restocking fee, while others don’t even allow returns. Often products
have expiration dates, so we have to be very careful not to get stuck with outdated or obsolete
product. Another substantial burden is carrying the receivables. Customers take up to 90 days
to pay for inventory, creating cash flow issues.

O&M’s main operational functions included receiving, put-away, order picking, and shipping.
Most warehouses used a hand-held radio frequency device (RF unit) to communicate and control
inventory levels and workflow. Each RF unit had a scanner that read barcode labels on pallets of
incoming product, bin locations, and shipping pallets. The RF units recorded changes in inventory
levels and locations immediately to the division’s central computer. Very little paper was needed to
exchange information.

Warehouses were divided into several different zones. Bulk zones held full pallets of product,
hand-stack zones were for boxes of product, and low-unit-of-measure zones housed ‘eaches’ of
product. There was also a clean room for sterile products such as wound-closure units, and a high-
velocity zone for the products that accounted for the top 56% of warehouse activity. These were
palleted and hand-stacked items that represented the facility’s top 650 items by velocity.

Divisions maintained two shifts. The 6:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. shift was primarily responsible for
receiving and inventory control. The second shift did the picking, packing, and loading of product.
Drivers left the facilities in the early morning hours to make delivery to most customers before 8:00
a.m.

In addition to managing inventory, distributors tracked and verified customer prices for
contracted product purchases and monitored agreements between end-users and manufacturers.
Since tracking this information was time-consuming and labor-intensive, O&M found the
information stored in its databases and its expertise in product replenishment was valuable to both
suppliers and customers. As Stefanic explained:

Manufacturers have to rely on distributors for information on product flow. Our
manufacturers sell large quantities of product that comes to us by the truckload. We break it
down and deliver it to the customer. We supply customer usage and sales numbers back to the
manufacturers. We provide information on market trends, buying patterns, and product
penetration that manufacturers use to manage their operations and production schedules.

Rebates are another complicated aspect of the supply chain. The manufacturer sells O&M a
box of product for $1, but the manufacturer may have negotiated a different price for the same
item to different customers, such as $.75 for one customer, $.73 for another, and so forth. The
negotiated price is what we receive from the customer. We have to collect the price
information and claim the price differential from the manufacturer using debit memos twice a
month. Maintaining price changes is also quite time-consuming. Manufacturing sales people
often negotiate new prices and fail to notify us. Sometimes, we get updated pricing contracts
from the customers themselves. All this activity requires us to maintain an army of contract
people. We have 60 employees in contracts at the home office and their full-time job is to
monitor and maintain pricing contracts and claim price rebates.

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100-055 Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

8

Financial Performance 1984-1995

For the last ten years, O&M’s financial picture reflected the opportunities and challenges of the
health care industry. While the company enjoyed a constant increase in net revenue, its gross margin
as a percent of net sales declined from 14.5% in 1984 to 9.7% in 1994 (see Exhibit 3 for selected
financial data).

The company responded to the downward pressure on margins by instituting internal cost control
measures, specifically cutting sales, general and administrative (SG&A) expenses. The company was
able to cut SG&A expenses from 12.5% of net sales in 1984 to 6.8% in 1994. In 1995, however, the
company spent more on SG&A expenses—primarily personnel costs—in order to meet new contracts
that called for “enhanced service levels” such as stockless and just-in-time services. Stockless and
just-in-time systems required more labor, deliveries to customer, packaging, and material handling
than traditional systems. As O&M’s 1995 Annual Report explained:

The increase in SG&A costs as a percentage of net sales was primarily a result of increased
personnel costs caused by new contracts providing for enhanced service levels and services not
previously provided by the Company, a significant increase in the number of SKU’s
distributed by the Company, system conversions, opening or expanding 11 distribution centers
and reconfiguring warehouse systems. This was mostly the result of absorbing Stuart Medical.

Coupled with a $42.8 million restructuring cost associated with the acquisition of Stuart Medical
and a decrease in gross margin, the rising expenses took a toll on the company, resulting in a net loss
of $11.3 million. The 1995 Annual Report described coming through “the toughest two quarters in
the Company’s history.”

ABC at the Savage Center

O&M first began to explore activity-based (ABC) costing in 1994, under the guidance of Michael
Stefanic, who had been hired to create and head a cost accounting department at O&M. In order to
better understand and control costs, Stefanic initiated an ABC pilot project at the Richmond division.
With the lessons learned from that early iteration, Stefanic’s team moved on to Valderas’ distribution
center in Savage, Maryland. The Savage center employed 120 people and carried over 50,000 line
items in its 121,000 square-foot facility. Savage utilized 12 tractor-trailer trucks to deliver product to
its 120 customers. In 1995, the center grossed $111.5 million in revenues. The market served by the
Savage facility was extremely dense, nearly 12 million people lived within one hour of its location.
As a result, it had one of the lowest delivery costs in the company.

Customer Profitability

As a mover of bulk product, O&M had little cause to track customer profitability, since most
customers had relatively similar needs. As customers demanded enhanced services such as stockless
systems, however, the activity levels of those customers skyrocketed. Instead of one delivery per
week, stockless customers demanded one or more per day. Stockless customers also wanted pallets
and cases broken up and repacked into smaller units. O&M had very little information to price these
new services properly. As Valderas explained:

In the mid-1980s customers began to demand more service from their distributors. Prior to
that time most distributors’

Accounting homework help

you will create a training plan as the project.  You can utilize content from weekly resources, scholarly articles, and other resource material to develop the final project.  The paper will be approximately 8-10 pages in length, using 
APA 7th Edition (Links to an external site.)
 guidelines.

Remember, the emphasis of this plan is application. Your plan should be comprehensive enough that you can hand it to another trainer and they will be able to implement it. It is not meant to be a summary of what a training plan is or an essay on parts of a training plan. While most weeks might have been narrative in format, this final project should be instructive.

Let us follow the Role Play methodology here as well. Craft your training plan as if you are submitting it to your current employer for execution. This is not meant to be a “graduate-level writing assignment” where you repeat theory. Instead, we want to see the theory actively applied through a training plan.

Included in this plan will be the following sections (it is highly recommended that you use these as headers in your paper):

· Introduction/background (information about the organization, employees, the need for training)

· Review the Needs Assessment

· Learning Objectives (use the ones from Week 1)

· Program Design

· Training Methods

· Technology Considerations

· Training Evaluation (outcomes; types of evaluation; evaluating the trainee and the training itself)

· Challenges/Issues (How will the success of the training be proven? What challenges could the trainer face? How can these be addressed?)

Accounting homework help

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, CC BY Charles Hackner Houston Community College unless
otherwise noted.

Macroeconomics 2301

questions for Exam 3

You must send me your answers to all of the questions. I will

grade 6 of your answers.

1. Please explain the difference between the transaction demand for money and the
asset demand for money, and how they work together to determine the total

demand for money.
a. The slides and audio should help with this, as well as other sources of information.

2. The Federal Reserve is responsible for managing the U.S. money supply.

a. List and thoroughly explain 6 of the functions of the Federal Reserve
System. Be specific.

i. Use the slides, audio, and the Federal Reserve website for this.

b. Please thoroughly and completely explain how money is created and
destroyed.

i. Please use the slides and audio for this.

c. Please thoroughly and completely explain how each of the 3 tools of
monetary policy would work to address the problem of recession. Include

the impact of those tools on the key economic variables. Specifically, I

want you to explain how each of the 3 tools would work using the chain of

events approach.
i. Take each of the 3 monetary policy tools and show how each would work to address

the problem of recession. Use the what-happens-next approach to ensure that you are

being as specific as possible.

d. Please thoroughly and completely explain how each of the 3 tools of
monetary policy would work to address the problem of inflation. Include

the impact of those tools on the key economic variables. Specifically, I

want you to explain how each of the 3 tools would work using the chain of

events approach.

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otherwise noted.

3. Addressing inflation using Fiscal and Monetary Policy tools.

Scenario – The US economy is currently experiencing high rates of inflation. You

have Fiscal and Monetary policy tools available to address this problem:

a. To attack the problem of inflation you must select one Monetary Policy
tool and one Fiscal Policy tool. Write down the name of your Fiscal Policy

tool and your Monetary Policy tool.
i. Think the options through and write down your choices.

b. Please explain why you selected each tool and why you did not select the
other choices? Do this for both monetary and fiscal policy tools!

i. Specifically, explain what is so good about the tool you selected and what is not so
good about the tools you did not select? Do this for both the Monetary Policy tool

and the Fiscal Policy tool. The key here is to use some decision criteria in making

your choice.

c. Thoroughly and completely explain how your solution (both the monetary
and the fiscal policy tools) would work to solve the problem of inflation,

and indicate the impact your solution would have on at least 5 key

economic variables. Be specific.
i. Present this using the chain of events format with up or down arrows to indicate the

direction of impact on each variable. I need to see the detail.

4. Addressing recession using Fiscal and Monetary Policy tools.

Scenario – The US economy is currently experiencing recession. You have Fiscal

and Monetary policy tools available to address this problem:

a. To attack the problem of recession, you must select at least one Monetary
Policy tool and one Fiscal Policy tool. Write down the name of your Fiscal

Policy tool and your Monetary Policy tool.
i. Think the options through and write down your choices.

b. Please explain why you selected the tools that you selected and why you did
not select the other choices? Do this for both monetary and fiscal policy

tools!
i. Specifically, explain what is so good about the tool you selected and what is not so

good about the tools you did not select? Do this for both the Monetary Policy tool

and the Fiscal Policy tool. The key here is to use some decision criteria in making

your choice.

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otherwise noted.

c. Thoroughly and completely explain how your solution (both monetary and
fiscal policy tools) would work to solve the problem of recession, and

indicate the impact your solution would have on the key economic

variables. Be specific.
i. Present this using the chain of events format with up or down arrows to indicate the

direction of impact on each variable. I need to see the detail.

5. Creative problem solving

Scenario #1:

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown us that our health care system needs serious

improvements. Even before the pandemic America spent more money on health

care and got the poorest results of any developed nation.

Your mission is to create an American health care system that delivers the best

results at a cost more in line with the other developed nations of the world. You

have the tools of fiscal and monetary policy available.

a. Present your solution to the problem – write it down first.

i. Strategy for creating your solution:

1. The explanation of the solution should take at least 3 good paragraphs! This
should be the opening part of your answer.

2. Determine what will be required to make the solution happen.

3. Think of ways to use your fiscal and monetary policy tools to get the needed
money. To attack the problem you must select at least one Monetary Policy

tool and one Fiscal Policy tool.

b. Write down the names of the one fiscal policy tool and the one monetary
policy tools you picked.

i. Remember – for this question you need one Fiscal Policy tool and one Monetary
Policy tool.

c. Explain why you picked the tools that you picked and why you did not
select the other choices.

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, CC BY Charles Hackner Houston Community College unless
otherwise noted.

i. Specifically explain, what is good about the tool you selected and what is not so good
about the tools you did not select? Do this for both the monetary and fiscal policy

tool that you selected. The key here is to use some decision criteria in making your

choice.

d. Thoroughly and completely explain how your solution would work to solve
the problem. You must include and explain the use of your monetary and

fiscal policy tools and indicate the impact your solution would have on the

key economic variables. Please present your answer using a chain of events

format. Be specific. I need to see the detail.

6. Creative problem solving.

Scenario #2:

The rate of growth in the US economy is currently 0.5% annually. Your mission

is to increase our growth rate to at least 4% annually, without setting off

unacceptable levels of inflation. You have the tools of fiscal and monetary policy

available.

****Focus on increasing the quantity and / or quality of human capital as a means

to stimulate economic growth.****

a. Present your solution to the problem – write it down.

i. Strategy for creating your solution:
1. First choose to focus on increasing the quantity of human capital or the quality

of human capital to significantly increasing the GDP growth rate.

2. This will lead you to a general solution to the problem.

3. Write it down! The explanation of the solution should take at least 3 good
paragraphs! This should be the opening part of your answer.

4. Determine what will be required to make the solution happen, typically it is
money.

5. Think of ways to use your fiscal and monetary policy tools to get the needed
money. To attack the problem you must select at least one Monetary Policy

tool and one Fiscal Policy tool.

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otherwise noted.

b. Write down the name(s) of the one fiscal policy tool and the one monetary
policy tool that you picked.

i. Remember – for this question you need one Fiscal Policy tool and one Monetary
Policy tool.

c. Explain why you picked the tools that you picked, and why you did not
select the other choices.

i. Specifically explain, what is good about the tool you selected and what is not so good
about the tools you did not select? Do this for both the monetary and fiscal policy

tool that you selected. The key here is to use some decision criteria in making your

choice.

d. Thoroughly and completely explain how your solution would work to solve
the problem. You must include and explain the use of your monetary and

fiscal policy tools and indicate the impact your solution would have on the

key economic variables. Please present your answer using a chain of events

format. Be specific. I need to see the detail.

7. Currently the U.S. national debt is over $23 Trillion. Many people feel the high
level of the national debt is a very bad thing and it should be paid off.

a. Explain what would be involved in paying off the national debt.

b. List and explain in detail, 3 advantages of paying off the national debt.
This might be more difficult than you think.

c. List and explain in detail, 3 disadvantages of paying off the national debt.

d. List and explain 3 approaches to getting the money to eliminate the
national debt. Include the impacts each approach would have on the U.S.

economy.

e. State which approach you would use to get the money. Why did you select
the approach that you selected and not the alternatives?

f. Thoroughly and completely explain how your approach would work to
eliminate the national debt, and explain the impact your solution would

have on at least 5 key economic variables?
i. Implement your approach and use the what-happens-next approach to capture the

detail of how your solution might work.

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, CC BY Charles Hackner Houston Community College unless
otherwise noted.

8. You currently hold an important job at a Fortune 100 company. Please select a
bill currently in congress and provide an economic impact analysis of how that

piece of legislation might impact your company.

a. Provide a summary of the Bill, including the objective of the Bill.

b. In your analysis of the Bill
i. Explain how your company will be helped.

ii. Explain how your company will be hurt.
iii. Explain where the money will come from to fund the Bill.
iv. Explain how the money will be spent.
v. Explain the Economic impact of the Bill on the U.S. Economy.

vi. Explain how the Bill will impact the 1% and the 99%.

Congress.gov is a good place to start. Please be thorough in your analysis. Try to think about how

the impacts of this legislation will work its way through our economy and how it will impact people,

businesses, the environment, etc. What groups of people will be impacted and how? What industries

will be impacted and how? Etc. Be as thorough as possible. We need to be able to complete this

type of analysis for the crazy stuff congress does, before the bills get passed so that we can either

support them or get them stopped.

Accounting homework help

4/25/2022 SME Review. I reviewed your document and I have several concerns. First, your topic does not align with your degree in Advanced Accounting. Second, many of the sources selected are too old to be used in current research. Next, many of the elements in Chapter 1 do not follow the NCU guidance; I read Ch. 1 to understand your planned study. Lastly, the first two elements in Chapter 2 do not meet the minimum requirements as several elements are missing or not aligned. I will reach out to your chair and share my concerns so that you can rework this document to meet expectations. See comments in the attached document. Please address all and submit here with your Chairs permission.

Accounting homework help

INDEX

CONTENT
0 – Ecomputerl@and
0 – Starbucks
1 – Financial ratios e-computerl@and
2 – Performance measures Starbucks
3 – Test
4. More financial ratios tasks

O. E-computerl@and

Table: Financial Statements e-computerl@and
BALANCE SHEET P&L
2018 2019 2020 2018 Var 2019 Var 2020 Var
Current assets: 2,620 4,733 8,084
Cash and marketable securities 286 50 50 ROA Sales 10,000 100% 20,000 100% 30,000 100% a. Return on assets
Accounts receivable 1,667 3,333 6,667 Cost of goods sold 8,000 80% 16,200 81% 24,600 82% b. Operating profit margin
Inventories 667 1,350 1,367 Gross margin 2,000 20% 3,800 19% 5,400 18% c. Sales to assets ratio
Fixed assets: 5,000 5,500 6,000 Wages 200 2% 1,000 5% 1,800 6% d. Inventory turnover
Net fixed assets 5,000 5,500 6,000 Overhead costs 100 1% 385 2% 470 2% e. Debt equity ratio
TOTAL ASSETS 7,620 10,233 14,084 EBITDA 1,700 17% 2,415 12% 3,130 10% f. Working capital
Liabilities and Shareholders equity Depreciation 500 5% 550 3% 600 2% g. Quick ratio
Current liabilities 990 3,057 6,011 EBIT 1,200 12% 1,865 9% 2,530 8%
Accounts payable 720 1,407 2,051 Financial expenses 300 3% 370 2% 536 2%
Other current liabilities taxes 270 448 598 EBT 900 9% 1,495 7% 1,994 7%
Bank credit line 0 1,202 3,362 Taxes (30%) 270 3% 449 2% 598 2%
Long term liabilities 3,000 2,500 2,000 Profit 630 6% 1,047 5% 1,396 5%
Long term bank debt 3,000 2,500 2,000
Other long term liabilities 3,630 4,676 6,072
Shareholders equity 3,000 3,630 4,676
Profit of the year 630 1,046 1,396
TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,620 10,233 14,083
Interest or Financial expenses 300
Tax on interest 90
After tax interest 210
EBIT 1,200
After tax interest + net income 1,410
Total Assets 7,620
ROA 19%
Net income or EBIT 1,200
Sales 10,000
Profit margin 12%
Sales 10,000
Total Assets 7,620
Asset Turn ratio 131%
Cost of goods sold 8,000
Inventory 667
Inventory turnover 11.9940029985
(quite high )
Inventory 667
Daily cost of goods sold 21.9178082192
Inventory period = 30.431875
Long term debt 3,000
Equity 3,630
Long term debt equity 83%
Current assets 2,620
Current liabilities 990
Net working capital 1,630
Cash and Mark. Securi 286
Receivables 1,667
Current liabilities 990
Quick ratio 288
What is the shareholder´s equity in 2019? 4,676

ROA= (after tax interest + net income)/ total assets

ROA= EBIT/ Total assets

Profit margin= net income/sales

It measures the proportion of sales that finds its way into profits

Income available to debt and equity investors per dollar of the firm´s total assets

Asset Turnover ratio= Sales/Total assets at start of year

How much sales volumen is generated by each dollar of total assets.
It measures how hard the firm´s assets are working.
How efficiently the business is using its entire asset base

Inventory turnover= cost of goods sold/ inventory at start of year

Efficient company´s hold only a relatively small level of inventories

Inventory period= inventory at start of year/daily cost of goods sold

How many days of output are represented by inventories

Long term debt equity ratio

Net working capital = current assets – current liabilities

Quick (Acid Test) Ratio

Cash + marketable securities + receivables

Current liabilities

A low cash ratio may not matter if the firm can borrow on short notice

O. Starbucks

Table: Financial Statements Starbucks
BALANCE SHEET P&L
2014 2015 2014 Var
Current assets: 4,168 5,472
Cash and marketable securities 1,844 3,234 Sales 16,448 100%
Accounts receivable 948 839 Cost of goods sold 6,859 42%
Inventories 1,091 1,111 Gross margin 9,589 58%
Other current assets 285 288 Selling, general administration expenses 5,655
Fixed assets: 6,583 6,046 Depreciation 710 4%
Net fixed assets 3,519 3,201 EBITDA 3,224 20%
Other long term assets 3,064 2,845 Interest expense 64 0%
TOTAL ASSETS 10,751 11,518 Taxable income 3,160 19%
Liabilities and Shareholders equity Tax 1,092 7%
Current liabilities 3,039 5,378 Net income 2,068 13%
Accounts payable 2,244 1,940 Dividends 783 5%
Other current liabilities 795 3,438 Addition to retained earnings 1,285 8%
Long term liabilities 2,048 1,299
Long term bank debt 2,048 1,299
Other long term liabilities 5,664 4,841
Other long term liabilities 392 360
Shareholders equity 5,272 4,481
Profit of the year
TOTAL LIABILITIES 10,751 11,518
At the end of fiscal 2014, Starbucks had 748 million shares outstanding with a share price of 81.25$.
Calculate: a. Market value added. b. Market-to-book ratio. c. Economic value added. d. Return on start-of-the-year capital
a Market value added Number of shares outstanding * market share
Market value added 60,775,000,000
b Market to book ratio
Market to book ratio Market value of equity / Book value of equity
Market to book ratio 60,775,000,000 12
5,272,000,000
The company has multiplied the value of its shareholder´s investments 12 time
c Economic value added
c.1 Economic Value Total capitalization = Long term debt + shareholder´s equity
Long term debt 2,440
Shareholder´s equity 5,272
EV 7,712 Cumulative amount that has been invested in the past by debt and shareholders
c.2 Economic value added Net income + after tax interest – cost of capital * capital
Net income 2,068
Interest 64
Tax interest 22.4
After tax interest 42
Total capitalization or capital 7,712
We assume cost of capital 3%
Capital * cost of capital 231.36 How many dollars a business is earning after deducting the cost of capital
Economic value added 1,878 A firm creates value for its investors only if it can earn more than its cost of capital, more tan its investors can earn by investing on their own
d Return on capital start-of-the-year 2015 2,068 total profits that the company has earned for its debt and shareholders

1.Financial ratios E

Performance measures
TASKS 1:
1.1 Table 1 from 0. Financial Statements spreadsheet gives abbreviated balance sheets and income statements for e-computerl@and.
Calculate the following using balance-sheet figures from year 2018/2019 and 2020:
a. Return on assets
b. Operating profit margin
c. Sales to assets ratio
d. Inventory turnover
e. Debt equity ratio
f. Current ratio
g. Quick ratio
1.2 What is the shareholder´s equity in 2019?
See solutions in E- Computerl@and excel spreadsheet

2. Performance Measures S

Performance measures
TASKS 2:
2.1 Look at 0.Starbuck´s spreadsheet. At the end of fiscal 2014, Starbucks had 748 million shares outstanding with a share price of 81.25$.
The company’s weighted�average cost of capital was about 9%.
Calculate: a. Market value added. b. Market-to-book ratio. c. Economic value added. d. Return on start-of-the-year capital
See solutions in 0. Starbucks excel spreadsheet

3. Test

Test Financial ratios
TASK 3:
3.1. There are no universally accepted definitions of financial ratios, but five of the following ratios are clearly incorrect. Substitute the correct definitions
a. Debt–equity ratio  =  (long-term debt  +  value of leases)/(long-term debt  +  value of leases + equity) Debt ratio = total liabilities / total assets
b. Return on equity = (EBIT − tax)/average equity Net income /equity
c. Profit margin = net income/sales CORRECT
d. Days in inventory = sales/(inventory/365) inventory at start of year/daily cost of goods sold
e. Current ratio = current liabilities/current assets Current assets /current liabilities
f. Sales-to-net-working-capital = average sales/average net working capital Incorrect // Net working capital / total assets = Net working capital to total assets
g. Quick ratio = (current assets − inventories)/current liabilities (cash + marketable securities + receivables)/ current liabilities
h. Times-interest-earned = interest earned × long-term debt EBIT/interest payments
3.2. Financial ratios True or false?
a. A company’s debt–equity ratio is always less than 1. False
b. The quick ratio is always less than the current ratio True Quick ratio (cash + marketable securities + receivables)/ current liabilitites Current ratio (current assets /current liabilities)
c. The return on equity is always less than the return on assets False Return on equity = net income /net equity Return on assets = after tax interests + net income / total capital
d. Book rates of return Keller Cosmetics maintains an operating profit margin of 8% and a sales-to-assets ratio of 3. It has assets of $500,000 and equity of $300,000. Interest payments are $30,000 and the tax rate is 35%
a. What is the return on assets? b. What is the return on equity?
Solution to 3.2. d) Keller Cosmetics
Operating profit margin 8%
Sales to assets ratio 3
Assets 500,000
Equity 300,000
Interest payments 30,000
Tax rate 35%
Return on assets = after tax interests + net income / total capital
Tax interest payments 10500
After tax interests payments 19,500
Sales to assets or asset turnover Sales / Total assets
3 x/500.000
Sales 3*500.000 1,500,000
Net income 120,000
Return on assets
Capital = assets 500,000
Return on assets 28%
Income available to debt and equity investors per dollar of the firm´s total assets

4. More Financial ratios

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Accounting homework help

WEEK 2 TEMPER PAPER
Term Paper Deliverable: Reference List

MARIA E. PARASKEVOPOULOS
PROFESSOR: RUIZHEN HARDIN

ACCT 601
DeVry University

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1
Week 2 Term Paper Deliverable: Reference List ACCT 601

Week 2 Term Paper Deliverable: Reference List

Below are listed each of the references I currently plan to use in my research.

1. “The Functions of Managerial Accounting.” 17 March 2018. Accounting Tools: Accounting CPA

Courses & Books. https://www.accountingtools.com/articles/what-are-the-functions-of-

managerial-accounting.html.

a. This article explains what a managerial accountant does and the role he or she plays in a

business.

2. Johnson, Rose. “Managerial Accountant’s Role in Business Planning.” 2018. Small Business –

Chron. https://smallbusiness.chron.com/managerial-accountants-role-business-planning-

38322.html.

a. This article discusses the difference between financial and managerial accounting, as

well as the role managerial accountants play in decision-making, forecasting, and

budgets.

3. “Management Accounting in Support of the Strategic Management Process.” 2015. Chartered

Institute of Management Accountants. https://www.cimaglobal.com/Research–

Insight/Management-accounting-in-support-of-the-strategic-management-process/.

a. The article discusses the accountant’s involvement in the strategic management process,

techniques packaged as strategic management accounting, strategic decision making via

financial analysis.

4. Daraban, Marius C. “Business Value Created by Management Accounting.” 15 September 2018.

MPRA. https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/83093/1/MPRA_paper_83093.pdf.

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2
Week 2 Term Paper Deliverable: Reference List ACCT 601

a. This article discusses the scope of management accounting, its importance in business

and the value that it creates.

5. Narvas, Janis. “How to Manage Your Accounting Department Effectively.” 23 May 2017. D & V

Philippines. https://www.dvphilippines.com/blog/author/janis-narvas.

a. This article discusses the importance of a highly functional accounting department, as

well as methods and techniques management accountants, like controllers or CFOs, can

use to make their department operate more efficiently.

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you will create a training plan as the project.  You can utilize content from weekly resources, scholarly articles, and other resource material to develop the final project.  The paper will be approximately 8-10 pages in length, using 
APA 7th Edition (Links to an external site.)
 guidelines.

Remember, the emphasis of this plan is application. Your plan should be comprehensive enough that you can hand it to another trainer and they will be able to implement it. It is not meant to be a summary of what a training plan is or an essay on parts of a training plan. While most weeks might have been narrative in format, this final project should be instructive.

Let us follow the Role Play methodology here as well. Craft your training plan as if you are submitting it to your current employer for execution. This is not meant to be a “graduate-level writing assignment” where you repeat theory. Instead, we want to see the theory actively applied through a training plan.

Included in this plan will be the following sections (it is highly recommended that you use these as headers in your paper):

· Introduction/background (information about the organization, employees, the need for training)

· Review the Needs Assessment

· Learning Objectives (use the ones from Week 1)

· Program Design

· Training Methods

· Technology Considerations

· Training Evaluation (outcomes; types of evaluation; evaluating the trainee and the training itself)

· Challenges/Issues (How will the success of the training be proven? What challenges could the trainer face? How can these be addressed?)

Accounting homework help

FEDERAL CASES – CIVIL CASE

173 F.Supp.3d 44

United States District Court, S.D. New York.

Gigi JORDAN, Petitioner,

v.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Health and Human Services, and the Attorney General of the United States, Respondents.

No. 15-CV-1028 (RA)

Signed March 29, 2016

Synopsis

Background: Plaintiff brought action under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (VARA) against the Department of Justice (DOJ), the United States Attorney General, and other government officials, alleging that she was a victim of federal crimes perpetrated by her former husband. Defendants moved to dismiss.

Holdings: The District Court, 
Ronnie Abrams
, J., held that:


1
 plaintiff was allegedly a victim of purported financial fraud crimes under the CVRA;


2
 government fulfilled all of its CVRA obligations to plaintiff; 


3
 plaintiff was not entitled to documents or other information about government’s investigation under the CVRA; and


4
 plaintiff did not qualify as alleged victim of purported healthcare fraud crimes, under the CVRA.

Attorneys and Law Firms


*46
 Allan Laurence Brenner, Sole Practitioner, Long Beach, NY, for Petitioner.

John Dalton ClopperBrandon Herbert Cowart, U.S. Attorney’s Office, New York, NY, for Respondents.

OPINION & ORDER

RONNIE ABRAMS, United States District Judge.

Petitioner Gigi Jordan brings this Petition to enforce her rights under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (“CVRA”), 18 U.S.C. § 3771, alleging that she is a victim of federal crimes perpetrated by her former husband. Respondents the Department of Justice (“DOJ”), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”), the United States Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), and the Attorney General of the United States (collectively, the “Government”) move to dismiss the Petition, arguing that Jordan is not entitled to any remedies under the CVRA. Because the Government has already provided Jordan all the CVRA rights to which she is presently entitled, the motion is granted.


BACKGROUND
1

Jordan asserts that, between 1991 and the present, she “was the victim of a massive, far reaching scheme of fraud, forgery, conversion, threats and intimidation engineered by Raymond A. Mirra, Jr.,” her former husband. Pet. ¶ 1. She alleges that “Mirra, and others at his direction, used over 190 documents forged with Jordan’s signature in the commission of multiple acts of bank, mail and wire fraud.” Id. ¶ 6 (emphasis in original). The details of Mirra’s alleged schemes are set forth both in the Petition and a civil complaint currently pending in the District of Delaware, which is “incorporated [in the Petition] by reference.” 
*47
  Id. ¶ 7 & Ex. A (Compl., 
The Hawk Mountain LLC v. Raymond A Mirra, Jr., No. 13–CV–2083 (SLR), 2014 WL 3533911 (D.Del. Jul. 9, 2014)
 (“Ex. A”)). These filings allege that Mirra, among other things, opened fraudulent brokerage accounts, initiated illegal wire transfers, stole real property, and unlawfully profited from the sale of Jordan’s company to a corporation Mirra runs. See, e.g., Ex. A ¶¶ 59, 69, 225, 317. She further alleges that between 2008 and 2010, Mirra “engaged in a series of acts of harassment, intimidation and coercion of Jordan, as well as direct threats to her life … designed to prevent Jordan from discovering the conversion of her assets, asserting her rights to the assets, and to deter her from reporting Mirra’s financial wrongdoing to law enforcement authorities.” Pet. ¶ 10.

In addition to those acts “directly victimiz[ing her],” id. at 3, Jordan alleges that “beginning in or about 1994,” Mirra “embarked upon a multi-tiered plan” to perpetuate several healthcare fraudsid. ¶ 11, including “black-marketing HIV/AIDS drugs, drug diversion, money laundering and Medicaid fraud schemes,” id. ¶ 85. She asserts that “the monies expended, invested and otherwise utilized by Mirra and the enterprise, in the criminal transactions involving [the healthcare companies] were in whole or in significant part the proceeds of the fraud and conversion of Jordan’s rightful assets,” id. ¶ 35, and that the illegal proceeds were laundered through new accounts opened in her name without her knowledge, id. ¶ 9.

Jordan alleges that in 2011 “an attorney acting on Jordan’s behalf, arranged to meet with [an Assistant United States Attorney (“AUSA”) from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York (“SDNY”) ] … to discuss the vast financial fraud conducted against Jordan by Mirra.” Id. ¶ 36. Jordan claims that prior to the meeting, she discussed these frauds over the phone with the FBI, “provid[ing] overwhelming information to support that Mirra was operating a complex criminal enterprise.” Id. ¶ 38. She also asserts that she “sent extensive documentation to [the AUSA] that detailed the enterprise’s fraudulent financial activity.” Id. ¶ 39. In May 2011, Jordan’s attorney met with the SDNY AUSA “in an hour-long meeting” during which the attorney “provided everything law enforcement would need in an investigation related to Mirra and his associates[ ].” Id. The lawyer also provided the evidence to another SDNY AUSA. Id. ¶¶ 47-48. Jordan asserts that, despite the SDNY AUSA’s alleged initial “interest in the matter,” id. ¶ 40, “[n]either Jordan nor her attorneys were ever informed of the status or progress of any investigation in the Southern District of New York,” id. ¶ 48.

Jordan also alleges that she twice “sent the documentary materials to law enforcement in … Pennsylvania,” including several FBI agents and three AUSAs from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (“EDPA”). Id.¶¶ 44, 49. Although prosecutors did not initially respond, Jordan eventually received a phone call from the EDPA’s “First Ass[istant] US Attorney Louis Lappen … responding to [her] voicemail message.” Id. ¶ 50. happen allegedly asked that the materials be resent and “was apologetic saying he was going to look into why no one had responded to the documents sent and said he would be referring this to … the (then) Chief of their Criminal Division.” Id. After this phone call, “[n]either Jordan nor her attorneys were ever informed of the status or progress of any investigation in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.” Id. ¶ 51.

In late 2011, Jordan contacted HHS’s Office of Inspector General, which led to two meetings with HHS officials and FBI  
*48
agents in December 2011 and June 2012. Id. ¶¶ 53, 55-58. She alleges that, during these meetings, “[t]he targeted specificity and scope of their questions was entirely consistent with the notion that these matters were being investigated as potential criminal RICO violations, with Mirra as the enterprise’s focal point.” Id. ¶ 54. Throughout this period, Jordan’s attorneys and federal law enforcement remained in contact by email. Id. ¶¶ 53-60. Following the meetings, Jordan asked to speak with prosecutors working on these cases from the SDNY. Id. ¶¶ 61, 63. She alleges that she was denied the opportunity to do so because “the District Attorney of New York, the agency prosecuting Jordan for charges unrelated to the Mirra investigation[,] … requested that there be no face-to-face meeting between Jordan and federal prosecutors.” Id. ¶¶ 68, 71.2

On July 17, 2012, the SDNY held a press conference to announce “a complaint… alleging a massive Medicaid fraudinvolving a black market in HIV/AIDS drugs.” Id. ¶ 28. Jordan asserts that although “Mirra does not appear as a defendant in any of the pending indictments, nor is he mentioned by name in the body of any of the complaints, indictments or superseding indictments[, by] virtue of his long-standing status as principle of [some of the healthcare companies under investigation], he had to have been either a person of interest, a subject or a target of this wide-ranging multi-agency investigation.” Id. ¶ 33. According to Jordan, Mirra’s “omission from any existing indictments bespeaks a wider, ongoing investigation with the context of a potential RICO prosecution,” id. ¶ 34, and “[t]he [existing] indictment is predicated on criminal acts, including among other things, mail fraud and wire fraud, which usually lay at the heart of a typical RICO investigation and or prosecution,” id. ¶ 32. Jordan alleges that while she requested meetings with prosecutors after the indictment was filed, the Government refused her requests. See id. ¶¶ 63, 71-72.

After Jordan filed the instant action to enforce the rights she claims were denied to her under the CVRA, the Government moved to dismiss. On March 24, 2016, the Court held oral argument.

STANDARD OF REVIEW

1
2In reviewing a motion to dismiss, the Court must accept all factual allegations in the petition as true and draw all reasonable inferences in the plaintiff’s favor. 
Forest Park Pictures v. Universal Television Network, Inc., 683 F.3d 424, 429 (2d Cir.2012)
. To survive a motion to dismiss, however, a petition “ ‘must contain sufficient factual matter, accepted as true, to ‘state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face.’ ” 
Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 678, 129 S.Ct. 1937, 173 L.Ed.2d 868 (2009)
 (quoting 
Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 570, 127 S.Ct. 1955, 167 L.Ed.2d 929 (2007)
). “A claim has facial plausibility when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.” 
Id.
 This standard demands “more than a sheer possibility that a defendant has acted unlawfully.” 
Id.
 “ ‘Plausibility … depends on a host of considerations: the full factual picture presented by the complaint, the particular cause of action and its elements, and the existence of alternative explanations so obvious that they render plaintiff’s inferences unreasonable.’ ”  
*49
 
Fink v. Time Warner Cable, 714 F.3d 739, 741 (2d Cir.2013)
 (quoting 
L–7 Designs, Inc. v. Old Navy, LLC, 647 F.3d 419, 430 (2d Cir.2011)
).

DISCUSSION

3Enacted in 2004, the CVRA guarantees victims of federal crimes an array of substantive and participatory rights. See

In re Rendon Galvis, 564 F.3d 170, 174 (2d Cir.2009)
. The statute was enacted to correct a criminal justice system that, as Senator Dianne Feinstein put it, had become “out of balance—while criminal defendants have an array of rights under law, crime victims have few meaningful rights.” 150 Cong. Rec. S4260-01 (daily ed. Apr. 22, 2004). While cautioning that “[n]othing in this chapter shall be construed to impair the prosecutorial discretion of the Attorney General or any officer under his direction,” 18 U.S.C. § 3771(d)(6), Congress passed the CVRA to ensure that actors in the criminal justice system “care about both the rights of accused and the rights of victims,” 150 Cong. Rec. S4260-01 (daily ed. Apr. 22, 2004) (statement of Sen. Feinstein). To that end, the statute entitles victims—defined as those “directly and proximately harmed as a result of the commission of a Federal offense”—to ten rights that apply at various stages of a criminal prosecution. 18 U.S.C. § 3773(e)(2)(A). Jordan invokes four of those rights: (1) “The reasonable right to confer with the attorney for the Government in the case”; (2) “The right to proceedings free from unreasonable delay”; (3) “The right to be treated with fairness and with respect for the victim’s dignity and privacy”; and (4) “The right to be informed in a timely manner of any plea bargain or deferred prosecution agreement.” 18 U.S.C. § 3771(a)(5)(a)(7)-(9); Pet. at 3; Oral Arg. Tr. 41:21-23.

Jordan alleges that she was a victim of two distinct categories of federal crimes that entitle her to CVRA remedies. First, the Petition alleges that “Mirra directly victimized Jordan through a series of federal criminal offenses, including but not limited to mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering, and racketeering,” Pet. at 3, as well as “forgery, conversion, threats and intimidation,” id. ¶ 1 (the “Financial Frauds”). In short, Jordan alleges that Mirra took large amounts of money from her banking and brokerage accounts without her knowledge or permission. See id. at 3–4. She asserts that she is a “direct” victim of the Financial Frauds because they were perpetrated directly—and exclusively—against her. See id. Second, the Petition alleges that “[i]n addition, Mirra was at the forefront of a criminal enterprise which engaged in a massive scheme of healthcare fraud,” id. at 3, which included “black-marketing HIV/AIDS drugs, drug diversion, money laundering and Medicaid fraud schemes,” id. ¶ 85 (the “Healthcare Frauds”). Jordan alleges that, for the Healthcare Frauds, she is a victim because her “divested assets were used for … financing” the fraudsid. at 3, and the illicit proceeds were laundered through new bank accounts that Mirra opened in her name, id. ¶ 9. Finally, in the event the Court does not grant Jordan CVRA remedies for the Financial or Healthcare Frauds, the Petition asserts an alternative theory that combines the two categories of offenses. Under this theory, Mirra’s alleged criminal actions, when examined together, constitute a criminal conspiracy under the Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (“RICO”), 18 U.S.C. §§ 1961 et seq.
 See, e.g., Pet. ¶¶ 33-35. Jordan argues that both the Financial Frauds perpetrated directly against her and the illegal Healthcare Frauds are predicate acts of this larger RICO enterprise.

Even assuming the facts alleged in the Petition to be true, each of Jordan’s claims must fail. Jordan, who has already had the  
*50
 opportunity to confer with the Government, is not presently entitled to any additional remedies in connection with the investigation of the Financial Frauds, is not a victim of the Healthcare Frauds, and is unable to demonstrate that an investigation into the proposed RICO enterprise would cause any additional CVRA rights to accrue.

I. Financial Frauds

The Financial Frauds allegedly perpetrated directly against Jordan include fraud, forgery, conversion, threats, and intimidation—all of which arise from the purported theft of her funds. Pet. at 3-4; id. ¶ 1. Jordan argues that, for the Financial Frauds, the Government failed to provide her CVRA rights to conferral, to proceedings free from unreasonable delay, and to treatment that is fair and respectful. Before determining whether Jordan is entitled to any of these rights, however, the Court must address two threshold questions.

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Accounting homework help

1.  What is the purpose of capital budgeting, and why is it used at state and local levels but not at the federal level, Do you think that is appropriate–why or why not? How does capital budgeting differ from current or general funding?  

2.  Capital projects are often financed through bond issues.  Discuss state and local bond financing, and why there is investor interest in such instruments.

3.  Discuss the importance of bond ratings to capital project financing.

4.  What is debt capacity and how can it be determined?

NOTE:

While the text does not really deal with personnel questions in the area of budgeting, consider this one question based on your own thoughts and experience:

5. Why are personnel management, pensions and health care critical to governmental budgeting?

6. How would you define intergovernmental relations, and what is its importance to budgeting?

7.  Since the federal government does not control the states in most areas, how does it get them to follow federal policies and mandates?

8. There is a real imbalance in service delivery and tax capacity between the federal government and state and local government.  What do I mean by that statement, and what is the resultant impact?

9.  There are significant differences between the relationship of the federal government to the states and the relationship of the state governments to their local governments.  Discuss that issue and its impact.


Accounting homework help

A Introduction to Web Scraping using Python

Table of Contents

· Scrape and Parse Text From Websites

· Your First Web Scraper

· Extract Text From HTML With String Methods

· A Primer on Regular Expressions

· Extract Text From HTML With Regular Expressions

· Check Your Understanding

· Use an HTML Parser for Web Scraping in Python

· Install Beautiful Soup

· Create a BeautifulSoup Object

· Use a BeautifulSoup Object

Web scraping is the process of collecting and parsing raw data from the Web, and the Python community has come up with some pretty powerful web scraping tools.

The Internet hosts perhaps the greatest source of information—and misinformation—on the planet. Many disciplines, such as data science, business intelligence, and investigative reporting, can benefit enormously from collecting and analyzing data from websites.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to:

· Parse website data using string methods and regular expressions

· Parse website data using an HTML parser

· Interact with forms and other website components

Scrape and Parse Text From Websites

Collecting data from websites using an automated process is known as web scraping. Some websites explicitly forbid users from scraping their data with automated tools like the ones you’ll create in this tutorial. Websites do this for two possible reasons:

1. The site has a good reason to protect its data. For instance, Google Maps doesn’t let you request too many results too quickly.

2. Making many repeated requests to a website’s server may use up bandwidth, slowing down the website for other users and potentially overloading the server such that the website stops responding entirely.

Important: Before using your Python skills for web scraping, you should always check your target website’s acceptable use policy to see if accessing the website with automated tools is a violation of its terms of use. Legally, web scraping against the wishes of a website is very much a gray area.

Please be aware that the following techniques 


may be illegal


 when used on websites that prohibit web scraping.

Let’s start by grabbing all the HTML code from a single web page. You’ll use a page on Real Python that’s been set up for use with this tutorial.

Your First Web Scraper

One useful package for web scraping that you can find in Python’s standard library is urllib, which contains tools for working with URLs. In particular, the urllib.request module contains a function called urlopen() that can be used to open a URL within a program.

In IDLE’s interactive window, type the following to import urlopen():

>>>

>>> from urllib.request import urlopen

The web page that we’ll open is at the following URL:

>>>

>>> url = “http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/aphrodite”

To open the web page, pass url to urlopen():

>>>

>>> page = urlopen(url)

urlopen() returns an HTTPResponse object:

>>>

>>> page

<http.client.HTTPResponse object at 0x105fef820>

To extract the HTML from the page, first use the HTTPResponse object’s .read() method, which returns a sequence of bytes. Then use .decode() to decode the bytes to a string using UTF-8:

>>>

>>> html_bytes = page.read()

>>> html = html_bytes.decode(“utf-8”)

Now you can 


print


 the HTML to see the contents of the web page:

>>>

>>> print(html)

(Insert full-screen snapshot here)

Once you have the HTML as text, you can extract information from it in a couple of different ways.

Extract Text From HTML With String Methods

One way to extract information from a web page’s HTML is to use string methods. For instance, you can use .find() to search through the text of the HTML for the <title> tags and extract the title of the web page.

Let’s extract the title of the web page you requested in the previous example. If you know the index of the first character of the title and the first character of the closing </title> tag, then you can use a string slice to extract the title.

Since .find() returns the index of the first occurrence of a substring, you can get the index of the opening <title> tag by passing the string “<title>” to .find():

>>>

>>> title_index = html.find(“<title>”)

>>> title_index

[Answer Here]

You don’t want the index of the <title> tag, though. You want the index of the title itself. To get the index of the first letter in the title, you can add the length of the string “<title>” to title_index:

>>>

>>> start_index = title_index + len(“<title>”)

>>> start_index

[Answer Here]

Now get the index of the closing </title> tag by passing the string “</title>” to .find():

>>>

>>> end_index = html.find(“</title>”)

>>> end_index

[Answer Here]

Finally, you can extract the title by slicing the html string:

>>>

>>> title = html[start_index:end_index]

>>> title

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot for the above four code exercises here)

Real-world HTML can be much more complicated and far less predictable than the HTML on the Aphrodite profile page. Here’s another profile page with some messier HTML that you can scrape:

>>>

>>> url = “http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/poseidon”

Try extracting the title from this new URL using the same method as the previous example:

>>>

>>> url = “http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/poseidon”

>>> page = urlopen(url)

>>> html = page.read().decode(“utf-8”)

>>> start_index = html.find(“<title>”) + len(“<title>”)

>>> end_index = html.find(“</title>”)

>>> title = html[start_index:end_index]

>>> title

(Insert full-screen snapshot here)

A Primer on Regular Expressions

Regular expressions—or regexes for short—are patterns that can be used to search for text within a string. Python supports regular expressions through the standard library’s re module.

Note: Regular expressions aren’t particular to Python. They’re a general programming concept and can be used with any programming language.

To work with regular expressions, the first thing you need to do is import the re module:

>>>

>>> import re

Regular expressions use special characters called metacharacters to denote different patterns. For instance, the asterisk character (*) stands for zero or more of whatever comes just before the asterisk.

In the following example, you use findall() to find any text within a string that matches a given regular expression:

>>>

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “ac”)

[‘ac’]

The first argument of re.findall() is the regular expression that you want to match, and the second argument is the string to test. In the above example, you search for the pattern “ab*c” in the string “ac”.

The regular expression “ab*c” matches any part of the string that begins with an “a”, ends with a “c”, and has zero or more instances of “b” between the two. re.findall() returns a 
list
 of all matches. The string “ac” matches this pattern, so it’s returned in the list.

Here’s the same pattern applied to different strings:

>>>

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “abcd”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “acc”)

[Answer Here ]

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “abcac”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “abdc”)

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

Notice that if no match is found, then findall() returns an empty list.

Pattern matching is case sensitive. If you want to match this pattern regardless of the case, then you can pass a third argument with the value re.IGNORECASE:

>>>

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “ABC”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“ab*c”, “ABC”, re.IGNORECASE)


[Answer Here]


(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

You can use a period (.) to stand for any single character in a regular expression. For instance, you could find all the strings that contain the letters “a” and “c” separated by a single character as follows:

>>>

>>> re.findall(“a.c”, “abc”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.c”, “abbc”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.c”, “ac”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.c”, “acc”)


[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

The pattern .* inside a regular expression stands for any character repeated any number of times. For instance, “a.*c” can be used to find every substring that starts with “a” and ends with “c”, regardless of which letter—or letters—are in between:

>>>

>>> re.findall(“a.*c”, “abc”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.*c”, “abbc”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.*c”, “ac”)

[Answer Here]

>>> re.findall(“a.*c”, “acc”)

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

Often, you use re.search() to search for a particular pattern inside a string. This function is somewhat more complicated than re.findall() because it returns an object called a MatchObject that stores different groups of data. This is because there might be matches inside other matches, and re.search() returns every possible result.

The details of the MatchObject are irrelevant here. For now, just know that calling .group() on a MatchObject will return the first and most inclusive result, which in most cases is just what you want:

>>>

>>> match_results = re.search(“ab*c”, “ABC”, re.IGNORECASE)

>>> match_results.group()

‘ABC’

There’s one more function in the re module that’s useful for parsing out text. re.sub(), which is short for substitute, allows you to replace text in a string that matches a regular expression with new text. It behaves sort of like the .replace() string method.

The arguments passed to re.sub() are the regular expression, followed by the replacement text, followed by the string. Here’s an example:

>>>

>>> string = “Everything is <replaced> if it’s in <tags>.”

>>> string = re.sub(“<.*>”, “ELEPHANTS”, string)

>>> string


[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

Perhaps that wasn’t quite what you expected to happen.

re.sub() uses the regular expression “<.*>” to find and replace everything between the first < and last >, which spans from the beginning of <replaced> to the end of <tags>. This is because Python’s regular expressions are greedy, meaning they try to find the longest possible match when characters like * are used.

Alternatively, you can use the non-greedy matching pattern *?, which works the same way as * except that it matches the shortest possible string of text:

>>>

>>> string = “Everything is <replaced> if it’s in <tags>.”

>>> string = re.sub(“<.*?>”, “ELEPHANTS”, string)

>>> string

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

This time, re.sub() finds two matches, <replaced> and <tags>, and substitutes the string “ELEPHANTS” for both matches.

Extract Text From HTML With Regular Expressions

Armed with all this knowledge, let’s now try to parse out the title from a 
new profile page
, which includes this rather carelessly written line of HTML:

<TITLE >Profile: Dionysus</title / >

The .find() method would have a difficult time dealing with the inconsistencies here, but with the clever use of regular expressions, you can handle this code quickly and efficiently:

import re

from urllib.request import urlopen

url = “http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/dionysus”

page = urlopen(url)

html = page.read().decode(“utf-8”)

pattern = “<title.*?>.*?</title.*?>”

match_results = re.search(pattern, html, re.IGNORECASE)

title = match_results.group()

title = re.sub(“<.*?>”, “”, title) # Remove HTML tags

print(title)

Let’s take a closer look at the first regular expression in the pattern string by breaking it down into three parts:

1. <title.*?> matches the opening <TITLE > tag in html. The <title part of the pattern matches with <TITLE because re.search() is called with re.IGNORECASE, and .*?> matches any text after <TITLE up to the first instance of >.

2. .*? non-greedily matches all text after the opening <TITLE >, stopping at the first match for </title.*?>.

3. </title.*?> differs from the first pattern only in its use of the / character, so it matches the closing </title / > tag in html.

The second regular expression, the string “<.*?>”, also uses the non-greedy .*? to match all the HTML tags in the title string. By replacing any matches with “”, re.sub() removes all the tags and returns only the text.

Note: Web scraping in Python or any other language can be tedious. No two websites are organized the same way, and HTML is often messy. Moreover, websites change over time. Web scrapers that work today are not guaranteed to work next year—or next week, for that matter!

Regular expressions are a powerful tool when used correctly. This introduction barely scratches the surface. For more about regular expressions and how to use them, check out the two-part series Regular Expressions: Regexes in Python.

Use an HTML Parser for Web Scraping in Python

Although regular expressions are great for pattern matching in general, sometimes it’s easier to use an HTML parser that’s explicitly designed for parsing out HTML pages. There are many Python tools written for this purpose, but the Beautiful Soup library is a good one to start with.

Install Beautiful Soup

To install Beautiful Soup, you can run the following in your terminal:

$ python3 -m pip install beautifulsoup4

Run pip show to see the details of the package you just installed:

$ python3 -m pip show beautifulsoup4

Name: beautifulsoup4

Version: 4.9.1

Summary: Screen-scraping library

Home-page: http://www.crummy.com/software/BeautifulSoup/bs4/

Author: Leonard Richardson

Author-email: leonardr@segfault.org

License: MIT

Location: c:\realpython\venv\lib\site-packages

Requires:

Required-by:

In particular, notice that the latest version at the time of writing was 4.9.1.

Create a BeautifulSoup Object

Type the following program into a new editor window:

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

from urllib.request import urlopen

url = “http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/dionysus”

page = urlopen(url)

html = page.read().decode(“utf-8”)

soup = BeautifulSoup(html, “html.parser”)

This program does three things:

1. Opens the URL http://olympus.realpython.org/profiles/dionysus using urlopen() from the urllib.request module

2. Reads the HTML from the page as a string and assigns it to the html variable

3. Creates a BeautifulSoup object and assigns it to the soup variable

The BeautifulSoup object assigned to soup is created with two arguments. The first argument is the HTML to be parsed, and the second argument, the string “html.parser”, tells the object which parser to use behind the scenes. “html.parser” represents Python’s built-in HTML parser.

Use a BeautifulSoup Object

Save and run the above program. When it’s finished running, you can use the soup variable in the interactive window to parse the content of html in various ways.

For example, BeautifulSoup objects have a .get_text() method that can be used to extract all the text from the document and automatically remove any HTML tags.

Type the following code into IDLE’s interactive window:

>>>

>>> print(soup.get_text())

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above results here)

There are a lot of blank lines in this output. These are the result of newline characters in the HTML document’s text. You can remove them with the string .replace() method if you need to.

Often, you need to get only specific text from an HTML document. Using Beautiful Soup first to extract the text and then using the .find() string method is sometimes easier than working with regular expressions.

However, sometimes the HTML tags themselves are the elements that point out the data you want to retrieve. For instance, perhaps you want to retrieve the URLs for all the images on the page. These links are contained in the src attribute of <img> HTML tags.

In this case, you can use find_all() to return a list of all instances of that particular tag:

>>>

>>> soup.find_all(“img”)

[Answer Here]


(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

This returns a list of all <img> tags in the HTML document. The objects in the list look like they might be strings representing the tags, but they’re actually instances of the Tag object provided by Beautiful Soup. Tag objects provide a simple interface for working with the information they contain.

Let’s explore this a little by first unpacking the Tag objects from the list:

>>>

>>> image1, image2 = soup.find_all(“img”)

Each Tag object has a .name property that returns a string containing the HTML tag type:

>>>

>>> image1.name

‘img’

You can access the HTML attributes of the Tag object by putting their name between square brackets, just as if the attributes were keys in a dictionary.

For example, the <img src=”/static/dionysus.jpg”/> tag has a single attribute, src, with the value “/static/dionysus.jpg”. Likewise, an HTML tag such as the link <a href=”https://realpython.com” target=”_blank”> has two attributes, href and target.

To get the source of the images in the Dionysus profile page, you access the src attribute using the dictionary notation mentioned above:

>>>

>>> image1[“src”]

[Answer Here]

>>> image2[“src”]


[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

Certain tags in HTML documents can be accessed by properties of the Tag object. For example, to get the <title> tag in a document, you can use the .title property:

>>>

>>> soup.title

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

If you look at the source of the Dionysus profile by navigating to the profile page, right-clicking on the page, and selecting View page source, then you’ll notice that the <title> tag as written in the document looks like this:

<title >Profile: Dionysus</title/>

Beautiful Soup automatically cleans up the tags for you by removing the extra space in the opening tag and the extraneous forward slash (/) in the closing tag.

You can also retrieve just the string between the title tags with the .string property of the Tag object:

>>>

>>> soup.title.string

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

One of the more useful features of Beautiful Soup is the ability to search for specific kinds of tags whose attributes match certain values. For example, if you want to find all the <img> tags that have a src attribute equal to the value /static/dionysus.jpg, then you can provide the following additional argument to .find_all():

>>>

>>> soup.find_all(“img”, src=”/static/dionysus.jpg”)

[Answer Here]

(Insert full-screen snapshot of the above strings here)

This example is somewhat arbitrary, and the usefulness of this technique may not be apparent from the example. If you spend some time browsing various websites and viewing their page sources, then you’ll notice that many websites have extremely complicated HTML structures.

When scraping data from websites with Python, you’re often interested in particular parts of the page. By spending some time looking through the HTML document, you can identify tags with unique attributes that you can use to extract the data you need.

Then, instead of relying on complicated regular expressions or using .find() to search through the document, you can directly access the particular tag you’re interested in and extract the data you need.

In some cases, you may find that Beautiful Soup doesn’t offer the functionality you need. The lxml library is somewhat trickier to get started with but offers far more flexibility than Beautiful Soup for parsing HTML documents. You may want to check it out once you’re comfortable using Beautiful Soup.

Note: HTML parsers like Beautiful Soup can save you a lot of time and effort when it comes to locating specific data in web pages. However, sometimes HTML is so poorly written and disorganized that even a sophisticated parser like Beautiful Soup can’t interpret the HTML tags properly.

In this case, you’re often left with using .find() and regular expression techniques to try to parse out the information you need.

BeautifulSoup is great for scraping data from a website’s HTML, but it doesn’t provide any way to work with HTML forms. For example, if you need to search a website for some query and then scrape the results, then BeautifulSoup alone won’t get you very far.

Accounting homework help

More financial ratios tasks
TASKS 4:
4.1. Magic Flutes has total receivables of $3,000, which represent 20 days’ sales. Total assets are $75,000. The firm’s operating profit margin is 5%.
Find the firm’s sales-to-assets ratio and return on assets
4.2 Consider this simplified balance sheet for Geomorph Trading:
Other liabilities 70
Current assets 100
Current liabilities 60
Long term debt 280
Long term assets 500
Equity 190
a. Calculate the ratio of debt to equity. b. What are Geomorph’s net working capital and total long-term capital?
4.3 Receivables
On average, it takes Microlimp’s customers 60 days to pay their bills. If Micro limp has annual sales of $500 million, what is the average value of unpaid bills
4.4 Current ratio
How would the following actions affect a firm’s current ratio?
a. Inventory is sold
b. The firm takes out a bank loan to pay its suppliers.
c. The firm arranges a line of credit with a bank that allows it to borrow at any time to pay its suppliers.
d. A customer pays its overdue bills.
e. The firm uses cash to purchase additional inventories
4.5 Inflation. How would rapid inflation affect the accuracy and relevance of a manufacturing company’s balance sheet and income statement?
4.6 Look up the latest financial statements for a company that you are creating and calculate the following ratios for the latest year: a. Return on capital. b. Return on equity. c. Operating profit margin. d. Days in inventory. e. Debt ratio. f. Times-interest-earned. g. Current ratio. h. Quick ratio.
SOLUTIONS
4.1. Sales to assets and Return on assets Magic Flutes has total receivables of $3,000, which represent 20 days’ sales. Total assets are $75,000. The firm’s operating profit margin is 5%.
Sales to assets Sales/ Total Assets at start of the year
Receivables 3,000
20 days sales
Total assets 75,000
Operating profit margin 5% Net income /Sales Net income sales * operating profit margin 3000
Asset turnover Sales/Assets
Profit margin Net income/Sales
Receivables turnover Sales/receivables 20 x/3000 60000 Sales
Sales 60,000
Net income 3,000
Return on assets After tax interest + Net income / Total assets
ROA 4%
Assets turnover Sales / Total assets
Asset turnover or sales to assets 80%
4.2 Balance sheet for Geomorph Trading:
Current assets 100 Current liabilities 60
Other liabilities 70
Long term assets 500 Long term debt 280
Equity 190
TOTAL ASSETS 600 TOTAL LIABILITIES 600
a. Calculate the ratio of debt to equity. b. What are Geomorph’s net working capital and total long-term capital?
Debt to equity Total liabilities / Total assets
Debt to equity 68%
Net working capital Net working capital / Total assets
Working capital -30
Total Assets 600
Net working capital -5%
Total long term capital 470
4.3 Receivables
Microlimp’s customers 60 days to pay their bills
f Micro limp has annual sales of $500 million, what is the average value of unpaid bills
Customers credit term 60
Sales 500,000,000
Receivables turnover Sales/Receivables
60 500.000.000/x
x 8,333,333
4.4 Current ratio
How would the following actions affect a firm’s current ratio?
a. Inventory is sold Neutral
b. The firm takes out a bank loan to pay its suppliers. Neutral
c. The firm arranges a line of credit with a bank that allows it to borrow at any time to pay its suppliers. Decreases
d. A customer pays its overdue bills. Neutral
e. The firm uses cash to purchase additional inventories Neutral
Current ratio Current assets / current liabilities
4.5 Inflation
Inflation. How would rapid inflation affect the accuracy and relevance of a manufacturing company’s balance sheet and income statement?

Criteria

Ratings

Pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeIntroduction

7 to >6.0 pts

Excellent

The paper thoroughly introduces the change in standard, an overview of the standard setting body, potential implications of the change, and the goals of the assignment.

6 to >5.0 pts

Good

The paper includes detailed descriptions for most of the following items but a few could have been explained more fully: the change in standard, an overview of the standard setting body, potential implications of the change, and the goals of the assignment.

5 to >4.0 pts

Fair

The paper includes descriptions for most of the following items but a few are missing or all could have been explained more fully: the change in standard, an overview of the standard setting body, potential implications of the change, and the goals of the assignment.

4 to >3.0 pts

Poor

The paper includes only brief descriptions for most of the following items or a few items were not discussed: the change in standard, an overview of the standard setting body, potential implications of the change, and the goals of the assignment.

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

The paper does not introduce the change in standard, nor does it provide an overview of the standard setting body, the potential implications of the change in standard, and identifies the points that the assignment will address.

7 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeAnalysis

20 to >17.0 pts

Excellent

This section thoroughly identifies and details the change in standard, discusses the implications of the change, and fully analyzes the impact of the change on the profession, managerial decision making, and on financial reporting.

17 to >15.0 pts

Good

This section mostly identifies and details the change in standard, discusses the implications of the change, and generally analyzes the impact of the change on the profession, managerial decision making, and on financial reporting.

15 to >13.0 pts

Fair

This section somewhat identifies and details the change in standard, discusses the implications of the change, and provides limited analysis on the impact of the change on the profession, managerial decision making and on financial reporting.

13 to >11.0 pts

Poor

The paper inadequately identifies and details the change in standard, discusses the implications of the change, and provides limited analysis on the impact of the change on the profession, managerial decision making, and on financial reporting.

11 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

The paper does not identify nor detail the change in standard, the implications of the change, and provides no analysis on the impact of the change on the profession, managerial decision making, and on financial reporting.

20 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSummary and Conclusion

7 to >6.0 pts

Excellent

The paper effectively summarizes the key points, and provides a conclusion that is based on a thorough analysis of the facts in the paper.

6 to >5.0 pts

Good

The paper effectively summarizes the key points, and provides a conclusion that is based on an analysis of the facts in the paper, with minor error.

5 to >4.0 pts

Fair

The paper summarizes most of the key points, however, the conclusion is not fully based on the analysis of the facts presented in the paper.

4 to >3.0 pts

Poor

The paper does not fully summarize the key points, and the conclusion is not based on the analysis of the facts presented in the paper.

3 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

The paper does not summarize key points, and the conclusion is not presented.

7 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeProfessionalism

8 to >7.0 pts

Excellent

The paper is well organized, contains correct spelling and grammar, and has a minimum of three properly formatted references in APA.

7 to >6.0 pts

Good

The paper is mostly organized, contains minor spelling and grammar errors, has largely formatted references in APA, and includes an overall impact.

6 to >5.0 pts

Fair

The paper is somewhat organized, contains a few errors in spelling and grammar, has a few improperly formatted references in APA, and/or includes a partial overall impact.

5 to >4.0 pts

Poor

The paper is less organized, contains several spelling and grammar errors, has a few improperly formatted references in APA, and/or includes a very brief overall impact.

4 to >0 pts

Unacceptable

The paper is unorganized, contains many spelling and grammar errors, has many improperly formatted references in APA, and does not include an overall impact.

8 pts

 This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMSAC.PLO-C: Analyze new and existing regulations and standards.

threshold: 3.0 pts

4 pts

Excellent: This paper provides thorough detail on the standard discussed, and thoroughly evaluates the impact on the standard for the profession and financial reporting.

3 pts

Good: This paper provides mostly thorough detail on the standard discussed, and evaluates the impact on the standard for the profession and financial reporting.

2 pts

Fair: This paper provides limited detail on the standard discussed, and provides a limited evaluation of the impact on the standard for the profession and financial reporting.

1 pts

Poor: This paper provides little detail on the standard discussed, and provides a limited evaluation of the impact the standard has for the profession and financial reporting.

0 pts

Unacceptable: This paper provides no detail on the standard discussed, and provides no evaluation about the impact on the standard for the profession and financial reporting.

4 pts

 This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMSAC.PLO-D: Apply accounting research regarding technical, tax and audit issues to managerial decision-making.

threshold: 3.0 pts

4 pts

Excellent: The paper applies appropriate research to effectively evaluate the impact of the technical, tax or audit issue on managerial decision making.

3 pts

Good: The paper applies appropriate research to mostly evaluate the impact of the technical, tax or audit issue on managerial decision making, with limited error.

2 pts

Fair: The paper applies limited research to evaluate the impact of the technical, tax or audit issue on managerial decision making.

1 pts

Poor: The paper applies little research and does not effectively evaluate the impact of the technical, tax or audit issue on managerial decision making.

0 pts

Unacceptable: The paper does not apply research and does not evaluate the impact of the technical, tax or audit issue on managerial decision making.

4 pts

Total Points: 50

Accounting homework help

Database 1 & Instructions

Average Temperatures by month For Washington D.C. between 1990 and 2001
Month Year Temperature Start the next four “Jobs” by looking over the instructions below. There are instructions that continue on down, so look for them all.
January 1990 40.8
February 1990 42.2 Job 7.1 Use the sort function to reorder the data by month, then use a formula to calculate the average temperature by month between 1990 and 2001. Next create a table of the average temperatures by month. Finally create a scatter plot of the data
March 1990 48.1 Job 7.2 Use the sort function to reorder the data by year, then use a formula to calculate the average temperature by year between 1990 and 2001. Next Create a table of the average temperature by year. Finally create a scatter plot of the data
April 1990 54.3 Job 7.3 Create a histogram of the temperatures creating 10 “bins” adding a title “Washington D.C. Temperatures” and change the color of the background and bars to your favorite College Football team colors
May 1990 61.6 Job 7.4 Create a Pivot Table with the months as rows, the final column is a Grand Total Average by month and
June 1990 72.0 The final row is a grand total average by year
July 1990 76.9
August 1990 73.8
September 1990 66.1 Use the database to the left for all of Jobs 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, and 7.4
October 1990 58.7
November 1990 48.6 Step-by-step instructions for Job 7.1
December 1990 41.3 1 Use the tab marked Job 7.1 and start by copying the raw data to this worksheet. You may also want to copy these instructions and the table below.
January 1991 34.0 2 Sort the data by month (Use “Sort & Filter), then create a table as you see below and use the “@average” formula and the reorganized data to get the average by month.
February 1991 39.5 3 Then use the “Insert -> Line chart” to creat a line chart beside the table showing the trend graphicaly by month
March 1991 46.1 4 Finally, explain what you see in the data regarding the average temperature by month in Washington D.C.
April 1991 56.0 Monthly
May 1991 69.3 Month Average
June 1991 72.3 January
July 1991 77.9 February
August 1991 77.0 March
September 1991 67.6 April
October 1991 56.6 May
November 1991 45.7 June
December 1991 38.5 July
January 1992 35.0 August
February 1992 38.0 September
March 1992 41.9 October
April 1992 53.1 November
May 1992 59.7 December
June 1992 68.6
July 1992 75.9 Step-by-step instructions for Job 7.2
August 1992 70.4 1 Use the tab marked Job 7. 2, copy the raw data to this tab. You may want to copy the instructions and the table below also.
September 1992 66.0 2 In this worksheet you will use the data sorted by year, as it should already be, to create a table as below. Again, use the @average formula and the reorganized data to get the average by year.
October 1992 52.2 3 Then use the “Insert” Line chart to creat a line chart beside the table showing the trend graphicaly by year
November 1992 45.7 4 Finally, explain what you see in the data regarding the average temperature by year in Washington D.C.
December 1992 36.8
January 1993 36.8
February 1993 31.7
March 1993 39.3 Yearly
April 1993 52.6 Year Average
May 1993 64.5 1990
June 1993 72.0 1991
July 1993 79.7 1992
August 1993 78.0 1993
September 1993 68.7 1994
October 1993 54.2 1995
November 1993 45.3 1996
December 1993 34.0 1997
January 1994 26.1 1998
February 1994 33.3 1999
March 1994 42.7 2000
April 1994 60.1 2001
May 1994 59.9
June 1994 76.1
July 1994 79.5
August 1994 73.8 Step-by-step instructions for Job 7.3
September 1994 66.7 1 Use the tab marked Job 7. 3, copy the raw data to this tab. Also copy these instructions.
October 1994 53.9 2 You do not need to sort the data for this job. In this worksheet you will create a histogram of all of the temperatures
November 1994 49.1 3 Then, use the “Insert – Recommended charts – All Charts – Histogram” to create a histogram of all the data
December 1994 40.3 4 Once the chart is completed and inserted in the space below, click on the bars and change the “binning” to 7 bins, and change the color of the bars to your College Football team colors (yes, for real)
January 1995 37.2 5 Do a little research online regarding how to read a histogram and explain what you see in the chart
February 1995 31.3
March 1995 46.1
April 1995 52.6
May 1995 62.7 Step-by-step instructions for Job 7.4
June 1995 71.5 1 Use the tab marked Job 7.4, copy the raw data to this tab. You may also want to copy these instructions
July 1995 78.2 2 In this worksheet you will create a Pivot-table and pivot chart
August 1995 77.6 3 Start in “Insert – Pivot Table & Chart”
September 1995 67.1 4 Insert the month data for the rows and the year data for the columns, and put the “Temperature” in as the “∑ Value.” Change the “Value Field Setting” to the Max Temperature
October 1995 58.3 5 Explain what the pivot chart tells you and how it relates to the two tables and charts you have already created in Jobs 7.1 and 7.2
November 1995 39.7
December 1995 33.0
January 1996 30.0
February 1996 34.7
March 1996 39.7
April 1996 54.6
May 1996 59.7
June 1996 72.8
July 1996 72.9
August 1996 72.7
September 1996 67.1
October 1996 55.7
November 1996 39.3
December 1996 38.3
January 1997 32.5
February 1997 40.5
March 1997 44.6
April 1997 50.3
May 1997 58.8
June 1997 69.1
July 1997 75.8
August 1997 73.3
September 1997 65.1
October 1997 53.7
November 1997 43.6
December 1997 37.2
January 1998 40.1
February 1998 41.0
March 1998 45.5
April 1998 54.9
May 1998 66.0
June 1998 70.4
July 1998 75.3
August 1998 76.2
September 1998 72.7
October 1998 56.2
November 1998 45.6
December 1998 40.9
January 1999 34.9
February 1999 37.5
March 1999 41.4
April 1999 53.0
May 1999 62.8
June 1999 70.8
July 1999 78.5
August 1999 75.4
September 1999 67.0
October 1999 53.1
November 1999 50.1
December 1999 38.2
January 2000 32.7
February 2000 36.8
March 2000 48.2
April 2000 53.6
May 2000 64.8
June 2000 72.3
July 2000 72.1
August 2000 73.0
September 2000 65.2
October 2000 57.2
November 2000 42.9
December 2000 28.1
January 2001 32.3
February 2001 38.5
March 2001 36.2
April 2001 55.5
May 2001 60.8
June 2001 69.0
July 2001 72.2
August 2001 64.1
September 2001 65.3

Job 7.1

Job 7.2

Job 7.3

Job 7.4

Database 2 & Instructions

Accounting homework help

1.  What is the purpose of capital budgeting, and why is it used at state and local levels but not at the federal level, Do you think that is appropriate–why or why not? How does capital budgeting differ from current or general funding?  

2.  Capital projects are often financed through bond issues.  Discuss state and local bond financing, and why there is investor interest in such instruments.

3.  Discuss the importance of bond ratings to capital project financing.

4.  What is debt capacity and how can it be determined?

NOTE:

While the text does not really deal with personnel questions in the area of budgeting, consider this one question based on your own thoughts and experience:

5. Why are personnel management, pensions and health care critical to governmental budgeting?

6. How would you define intergovernmental relations, and what is its importance to budgeting?

7.  Since the federal government does not control the states in most areas, how does it get them to follow federal policies and mandates?

8. There is a real imbalance in service delivery and tax capacity between the federal government and state and local government.  What do I mean by that statement, and what is the resultant impact?

9.  There are significant differences between the relationship of the federal government to the states and the relationship of the state governments to their local governments.  Discuss that issue and its impact.


Accounting homework help

James Branch is the president of Root Corporation, a public traded corporation. At the
beginning of the year, Branch incorrectly predicted that company’s earnings would increase by
25% by end of year. Unfortunately, sales have been less that forecasted, and in the final
quarter, Branch determined that significant action need to be taken in order to meet earnings
projections.

Therefore, Branch directed all expenditures that could be postponed to the following fiscal year
be postponed including purchases from suppliers, repairs and maintenance on factory
equipment, employee training, advertising and travel. Branch expects substantial inventory on
hand at end of year and encouraged its controller to scrutinize all costs and reclassify as many
period costs as product costs.

Write a two-page analysis that addresses the criteria below. In addition to the two pages of
content, include a title page and a reference page with a minimum of two scholarly references.
Note, websites are not scholarly references. The analysis should be written in APA format,
following the guidelines outlined, and should not exceed four pages total.

Content should be organized as follows:

• Write a brief introduction of the situation.
• List the different costs the president requested be postponed to the next fiscal year and

describe their classification and impact of postponing the costs on the earnings of the
corporation.

• Explain the effect of reclassifying period costs to product costs on the earnings of the
corporation.

• Explain whether you believe the president’s actions are ethical. Address the
postponement and reclassification of expenses separately. Why or why not?

• Conclusion that summarizes key points presented in the paper.

Accounting homework help


350 words per answer, Minimum 1 Academic Source for each answer

1. Typical users of financial statements include internal users such as managers and external users such as creditors, investors, regulatory agencies. Which of these users would find more helpful information on the balance sheet and why? And which of these users would find more helpful information on the income statement and why?

2. Discuss the opinion that ‘accounting is the language of business.’

Accounting homework help

Inputs

Online Sales of Books and DVDs by region
Start the next two jobs by looking over the instructions below.
Step-by-Step Instructions for Jobs 5 & 6
Region Payment Source Amount Product Job 7.5 In the space directly below, create a Pivot Table and chart of the Sales by region (region is the row) and by product (DVD and Book are the two columns)
East Credit Web $177.72 Book Change the ∑ Values to “count” This tells you how many of each product was sold in each region
East Credit Web $20.39 Book You will analyze jobs 5 and 6 togeather
East Credit Web $151.67 Book
East Credit Web $18.29 Book 1 Highlight the entire database (Five columns on the left).
East Paypal Web $209.51 Book 2 Go to “Insert” and “PivotChart ” Use the option for table and chart
East Credit Web $15.96 Book 3 Insert regions in the rows and Products in the columns
East Paypal Web $18.12 Book 4 In the ∑ Values enter “Amount” and then change the option to “count”
East Credit Web $18.32 Book 5 If there isn’t enough room below, move Job 6 down to allow room for both the table and the chart
East Paypal Web $24.35 Book
East Credit Email $19.40 Book
East Paypal Email $23.49 Book
East Paypal Web $20.31 Book
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East Paypal Email $16.13 Book
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East Credit Email $21.01 Book
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East Paypal Web $243.70 Book
East Credit Email $209.20 Book Job 7.6 In the space directly below, create another pivot table and chart of the region (rows) and products (DVD and Book are the columns),
East Credit Email $24 Book This time change the “∑ Values” to Average Amount
East Paypal Web $17.19 Book Compare the data you obtained in Job 5 with that you found in Job 6 and explain what you see off to the side of the pivot table and graph
East Credit Web $21.64 Book
East Credit Web $15.32 Book 1 Again, highlight the entire database (Five columns on the left).
East Credit Web $20.97 Book 2 Go to “Insert” and “PivotChart ” Use the option for table and chart
East Credit Web $23.08 Book 3 Insert regions in the rows and Products in the columns
East Paypal Email $24.61 Book 4 For this chart, insert Amount into the “∑ Values” and change this to “Average Amount”
East Credit Web $24.97 Book 5 Now, compare the two charts and tables and draw some conclusions about what is going on in the four retions
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East Credit Email $23.89 Book
East Paypal Web $20.19 DVD
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Direct Materials Total CVP Analysis
Total Variable Costs Per unit
Sales Price Per unit
Variable costs $ 3.65
Markup 300%
Sale price $ 10.95
Contribution Margin Per unit
Total cost of direct materials, per batch $ 0.15 Selling price $ 10.95
Number cookies per batch 9.00 less: Total variable costs $ 3.65
Cost of direct materials per cookie 0.02 $ 7.30
Times cookies in sales unit 9.00
Total cost of direct materials, per unit $ 0.15
Direct Labor Total
Total cost of direct labor, per batch $ 3.05
Number cookies per batch 9.00
Cost of direct labor per cookie 0.34
Times cookies in sales unit 9.00
Total cost of direct labor, per unit $ 3.05
Variable Manufacturing Overhead Total
Total cost of variable MOH, per batch $ 0.20
Number cookies per batch 9.00
Cost of VMOH per cookie 0.02
Times cookies in sales unit 9.00
Total cost of VMOH, per unit $ 0.20
Variable Operating Expenses Total
Total cost of variable operating expenses, per unit $ 0.25
Fixed Manufacturing Expenses, Per Month Total
Total cost of fixed manufacturing expenses, per month $ 2,500
Less: Depreciation Expense 800
Total cash paid for fixed manufacturing expenses $ 1,700
Fixed Operating Expenses Total
Total cost of fixed operating expenses, per month $ 4,000
Less: Depreciation Expense 250
Total cash paid for fixed operating expenses $ 3,750

Operating Budgets

Sales & Cash Collections Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units Sold 2,768 8,919 2,060 13,747 5,932 3,602
Selling price per unit $ 10.95 $ 10.95 $ 10.95 $ 10.95 $ 10.95 $ 10.95
Total sales $ 30,310 $ 97,663 $ 22,557 $ 150,530 64955.4 39441.9
Cash collected, CM $ 18,186 $ 58,598 $ 13,534 38973.24 23665.14
Cash collected, 1M $ 7,577 $ 24,416 $ 5,639.25 9743.31
Cash collected, 2M $ 4,546 $ 14,649.46 $ 3,383.55
Total cash collected $ 18,186 $ 66,175 $ 42,496 $ 126,857 59261.9475 36792
Production Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units Sold 2,768 8,919 2,060 13,747 5,932 3,602
Add: Desired Ending Inventory 2,319 536 1,542 4,397 937 – 0
Units needed 5,087 9,455 3,602 18,144 6,869 3,602
Less: Beginning Inventory 2,319 536 2,855 1,542 4,397
Units to produce 5,087 7,136 3,067 15,289 5,326 (795)
Direct Materials Cash Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units to produce 5,087 7,136 3,067 15,289 5,326 (795)
Add: Desired Ending Inventory 1,142 491 852 (127) – 0
DM Needed for production 6,229 7,626 3,919 17,774 5,199 (795)
Less: Beginning Inventory – 0 1,142 491 852 (127)
Units of DM Needed 6,229 6,485 3,428 16,142 4,347 (668)
x Cost of DM per unit $ 0.15 $ 0.15 $ 0.15 $ 0.15
Total cost of DM $ 934 $ 973 $ 514 $ 2,421
Paid in CM $ 374 $ 389 $ 206
Paid in 1M $ 374 $ 389
Paid in 2M $ 187
Total cash paid $ 374 $ 763 $ 782 $ 1,918
Direct Labor Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units to produce 5,087 7,136 3,067 15,289
x Direct labor cost per unit $ 3.05 $ 3.05 $ 3.05 $ 3.05
Total cost of direct labor $ 15,515 $ 21,764 $ 9,353 $ 46,632
Manufacturing Overhead Cash Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units to produce 5,087 7,136 3,067 15,289
x Variable MOH rate $ 0.20 $ 0.20 $ 0.20 $ 0.20
Total Variable MOH 1,017 1,427 613 3,058
Add: FMOH Cash Payments $ 1,700 $ 1,700 $ 1,700
Total MOH Cash Payments $ 2,717 $ 3,127 $ 2,313 $ 8,158
Add: Non-Cash FMOH $ 800 $ 800 $ 800
Total MOH $ 3,517 $ 3,927 $ 3,113 $ 10,558
Operating Expense Cash Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units Sold 2,768 8,919 2,060
x Variable OpExp rate $ 0.25 $ 0.25 $ 0.25
Total Variable OpExp $ 692 $ 2,230 $ 515 $ 3,437
Add: FOpEx Cash Payments $ 3,750 $ 3,750 $ 3,750 $ 11,250
Total OpEx Cash Payments $ 4,442 $ 5,980 $ 4,265 $ 14,687
Add: Non-Cash FOpEx $ 250 $ 250 $ 250 $ 750
Total OpEx $ 4,692 $ 6,230 $ 4,515 $ 15,437

Financial Budgets

Cost to manufacture per unit
QTR
DM per unit 0.15
DL per unit 3.05
VMOH per unit 0.20
Total variable manufacturing cost 3.40
Total FMOH 5,100.00
/ Units produced 15,289
FMOH per unit produced 0.33
Total CoGS per unit $ 3.73
Your Cookie Co.
Combined Cash Budget
For the months and quarter ended,
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Beginning Cash $ – 0 $ 59,887 $ 94,179
Add: Owner contributions $ 45,000 $ – 0 $ – 0
Proceeds from loan $ 20,000 $ – 0 $ – 0
Cash collections $ 18,186 $ 66,175 $ 42,496
Cash Available $ 83,186 $ 126,063 $ 136,676
Less: Payments for DM $ 374 $ 763 $ 782
Payments for DL $ 15,515 $ 21,764 $ 9,353
Payments for MOH $ 2,717 $ 3,127 $ 2,313
Payments for OpExp $ 4,692 $ 6,230 $ 4,515
Capital expenditures
Cash payments $ 23,298 $ 31,883 $ 16,963
Cash before financing $ 59,887 $ 94,179 $ 119,712
Add: Cash from (paid to) line of credit
Less: Interest paid
Ending cash $ 59,887 $ 94,179 $ 119,712
Interest Calculations:
Outstanding Debt
Interest $ – 0
Your Cookie Co.
Income Statement (Absorption)
For the quarter ended,
QTR
Sales revenue $ 150,530
Less: Cost of Goods Sold
Total CoGS per unit $ 3.73
x Units sold 13,747
Total CoGS $ 51,325
Gross Profit $ 99,204
Less: Operating expenses
Variable OpEx per unit $ 0.25
x Units sold 13,747
Total Variable OpEx $ 3,437
Add: Fixed OpEx $ 11,250
Total OpEx $ 14,687
Operating income (loss) $ 84,518
Less: Interest expense $ – 0
Net Income (Loss) $ 84,518
Your Cookie Co.
Balance Sheet
For the quarter ended,
QTR
Assets
Cash 119,712.21
Accounts Receivable 23,672.26
Inventory, Raw Materials 852.19
Inventory, Finished Goods 1,542.32
Equipment 85,000.00
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 3,150.00
Total Assets 227,628.98
Liabilities
Accounts Payable 503.08
Line of credit 77,608.33
Bank loan 20,000.00
Total Liabilities 98,111.41
Equity
Common Stock 45,000.00
Retained earnings 84,517.57
Total Equity 129,517.57
Total Liabilities and Equity 227,628.98

Accounting homework help

Total Profit per Region

Region Total Profit
Asia $ 6,113,845.87
Australia and Oceania $ 4,722,160.03
Central America and the Caribbean $ 2,846,907.85
Europe $ 11,082,938.63
Middle East and North Africa $ 5,761,191.86
North America $ 1,457,942.76
Sub-Saharan Africa $ 12,183,211.40

Sales per Month

Sales per Month for Reps
April May June July Total
Minu $10,100 $20,503 $11,312 $18,887 $60,802
Monu $10,100 $20,301 $21,614 $23,735 $75,750
Raju $20,200 $47,600 $28,674 $35,170 $131,644
Tiku $10,300 $9,270 $12,875 $12,978 $45,423

Accounting homework help

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Essay ENG 130: Literary Response for Setting

This assignment focuses on your ability to: learn how to interpret the literary device of setting
and how it affects the character of the story/poem.

The purpose of completing this assignment is: as a student, in your career, and individual
lives, you will often need to look beyond the plot and summary of what you are reading and put
a different spin on it. An example of this might be interpreting data and the varying components
of how that data was created, as well as what to do with the data as you move forward.

Prompt (What are you writing about):
Choose one of the readings from this unit and in a well-crafted 2-page essay, respond to the
following prompt:

How does the selected work use setting to drive the action of the story and create a specific
impression within the reader?

Instructions (how to get it done):

Read through all of the instructions of this assignment.

Read all of the 2 resources.

Select one of stories or poems to write about.

Your audience for this essay is people who have read the stories/poems.

Use text examples to support your answer.

Your essay will have the following components:

o A title page

o An Introduction

o A thesis at the end of the introduction that clearly states how setting shapes the

story.

o At least two supporting sections that defend your thesis/focus of the essay

o Text support with properly cited in-text citations

o A concluding paragraph

o A reference page with the short story citation

Requirements:

• Length and format: At least 2 pages.

• The title page and reference page are also required, but they should not be factored into
the 2-page length of the essay.

ENG 130- Literature and Comp

Literary Response for Setting as a Device

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

• The paper should be double spaced with 1-inch margins. Choice of fonts: 11-point
Calibri, 11-point Arial,12-point Times New Roman. Essay should conform to APA
formatting and citation style.

• Use the third-person, objective voice, avoiding personal pronouns such as “I,” “you,”

“we,” etc.

• Please use the short story sources and any outside sources you need to create a

properly formatted APA reference page.

• Use APA format for in-text citations and references when using outside sources and

textual evidence.

• Skills to be assessed with this assignment: creating effective thesis statements,

incorporating text, responding to literature.

• Please be cautious about plagiarism. Make sure to use in-text citations for direct

quotes, paraphrases, and new information.

Mini lesson on thesis statements:

• Questions to ask yourself:

o What is the setting of my chosen story? What is the place? What

is the mood created by the author? How do the place and mood

affect the story for the reader?

o For example, it is apparent that in Whitman’s “I Hear America

Singing” you would devote a supporting section to the locations of

his poem and a supporting section to the mood he creates through

the setting.

• Translate that into a thesis:

o After you have made connections to these two areas of setting

you will then form your thesis.

o Here is a example template for your thesis. You are welcome to

use this template for your essay:

▪ In Walt Whitman’s poem “I Hear America Singing”, it is

apparent that the setting place and location shape the poem

through the obvious American workers’ locations and the

tone of triumph and hopefulness.

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Rubric for Setting Literary Response

Does Not Meet

Expectations

0-11

Below

Expectations

12-13

Needs

Improvement

14-15

Satisfactory

16-17

Meets

Expectations

18-20

Thesis Statement Thesis statement is

not present.

Thesis is unclear

and loosely related

to the paper or not

present. Thesis

does not appear in

the introductory

paragraph.

Thesis is attempted

with little relation to

the overall topic.

Argument is

somewhat unclear

or confusing. Some

supporting points

are missing. Thesis

may not appear in

the introductory
paragraph.

Thesis is present

and relates to the

majority of the

paper. Argument

takes a mostly

clear position and

is explained in

adequate detail.

Thesis appears in

the introductory
paragraph.

Thesis is organized

and focused on the

paper. Argument

takes a clear

position and is

explained in full

detail. Thesis

appears in the

introductory

paragraph.

Persuasiveness Fails to develop

arguments.

Some argument(s)

are developed, but

may be missing

one or need further

elaboration.

Develops most

argument(s).

Satisfactorily

develops

arguments.

Expertly and fully

develops

argument(s).

Evidence and

Support

Does not include

text support and/or

text support is not

cited.

Very little evidence

is given and used in

the essay properly.

Evidence may not

relate to the thesis

statement. Evidence

is cited but not with

the proper

formatting.

Some evidence is

used from the story

and/or is somewhat

related to the thesis

statement. Evidence

may or may not

always cited

properly.

Evidence from the

story is mostly tied

to the thesis

statement and used

properly and is cited

properly.

Evidence from the

story is used

effectively and cited

properly.

APA

Format

APA format is not

followed.

Errors in four areas
of APA format and
style.

Errors in three
areas of APA
format and style.

Errors in two areas
of APA format and
style.

No errors in APA
format and style.

Grammar and

Mechanics

Grammar and

mechanics’ errors

make the essay

incomprehensible.

Grammar, spelling,

punctuation, and

mechanics errors

occur throughout

document. Word

choices are seldom

academic.

Sentence structure

may be illogical or

unclear.

Several errors in

grammar,

punctuation,

spelling and

mechanics present.

Word choice

reveals some

understanding of

academic language

requirements.

Many sentence

structure issues

exist.

Some spelling,

grammar,

punctuation and

mechanical errors

are evident.

Academic

language is upheld.

The sentence

structure is often

logical and clear so

that relationships

among ideas are
established.

Free of

punctuation,

spelling, grammar,

and other

mechanical errors.

Consistent use of

academic word

choices. Sentence

structure is mostly

logical and clear.

*A zero can be earned if the above criteria are not met.
*Plagiarism will result in a zero.

  • Essay ENG 130: Literary Response for Setting
  • Prompt (What are you writing about):
  • Instructions (how to get it done):
  • Requirements:
  • Mini lesson on thesis statements:

Accounting homework help

A picture containing text, clipart  Description automatically generated

NVU Internship Program

Bi-Weekly Report

Instructions: To be completed by the student every two weeks and discussed with the site supervisor. Return this completed form to your faculty supervisor. Be clear and concise.

Student Name: Samantha Charron Report Number: Click here to enter text. of Click here to enter text.

Dates Covered: 2/1/2022 through 2/16/2022

1) Past two weeks’ assignments and responsibilities:

Introduction to company set up/history, specific source documentation for accounting entries, familiarization with new elements of the company accounting system and familiarization with new chart of account.

2) Supervisory conference (discuss topics, field trips, directed reading, meetings, etc.):

We meet daily just after lunch to review new areas of operations and conduct training and discuss new system work and tasks to be accomplished.

3) Objectives and plans for the next two weeks:

We will be concentrating on reconciliation of bank accounts and internal invoice processing to understand how to match general ledger accounts with working documents. Continuing familiarity with new accounting modules.

4) Referring to your learning objectives, analyze your successes and/or problems relating to those objectives. What have you learned about yourself, your strengths, weaknesses, goals, etc.? What observations have you made concerning your profession, the “world of work,” etc.? Be insightful and give specific examples to demonstrate your points. I have learned that I am better at learning hand on and going through the steps to do something rather than being told how to do the task. I have learned about the General ledge part of our accounting system to which I have not previously seen. I have also learned the journal entries which have to be made in order to properly form our general ledger debits and credit.

5) Site Supervisor’s comments and constructive criticism (this is mandatory):

Sam has shown the ability to quickly absorb new elements of the previously unused modules of the company accounting system. She shows a reliable retention of previously reviewed work and systems. So far there haven’t been any real areas of deficiency.

6) Hours worked week 1: 20 Hours worked week 2: 20 Total hours worked for the past two weeks: 40 Total hours worked to date: 40

Student Signature: ______Samantha Charron_______________ Date: _________02/16/22__________

Site Supervisor Signature: ___Mike Sarvak______________ Date: ____02/16/22_____________

Accounting homework help

James Branch is the president of Root Corporation, a public traded corporation. At the
beginning of the year, Branch incorrectly predicted that company’s earnings would increase by
25% by end of year. Unfortunately, sales have been less that forecasted, and in the final
quarter, Branch determined that significant action need to be taken in order to meet earnings
projections.

Therefore, Branch directed all expenditures that could be postponed to the following fiscal year
be postponed including purchases from suppliers, repairs and maintenance on factory
equipment, employee training, advertising and travel. Branch expects substantial inventory on
hand at end of year and encouraged its controller to scrutinize all costs and reclassify as many
period costs as product costs.

Write a two-page analysis that addresses the criteria below. In addition to the two pages of
content, include a title page and a reference page with a minimum of two scholarly references.
Note, websites are not scholarly references. The analysis should be written in APA format,
following the guidelines outlined, and should not exceed four pages total.

Content should be organized as follows:

• Write a brief introduction of the situation.
• List the different costs the president requested be postponed to the next fiscal year and

describe their classification and impact of postponing the costs on the earnings of the
corporation.

• Explain the effect of reclassifying period costs to product costs on the earnings of the
corporation.

• Explain whether you believe the president’s actions are ethical. Address the
postponement and reclassification of expenses separately. Why or why not?

• Conclusion that summarizes key points presented in the paper.

Accounting homework help

Ratios

Dec. 31, 2017 Dec. 31, 2016 Dec. 31, 2015 Dec. 31, 2014
LIQUIDITY RATIOS
Current ratio (times) 0.42 0.49 0.52 0.54
Quick ratio (times) 0.27 0.35 0.31 0.33
Average payment period (days) 183.41 181.43 151.15
ASSET MANAGEMENT RATIOS
Total asset turnover (times) 0.77 0.77 0.77 0.75
Fixed asset turnover (times) 1.55 1.63 1.77 1.84
Average collection period (days) 19.65 18.80 19.36 20.77
Inventory turnover (times) 6.26 9.89 17.27 21.85 Fuel Only
FINANCIAL LEVERAGE RATIOS
Total debt to total assets 73.90% 76.03% 79.58% 83.68%
Equity multiplier (times) 3.83 4.17 4.90 6.13
Interest coverage (times) 15.44 17.92 16.22 3.39
PROFITABILITY RATIOS
Operating profit margin 14.82% 17.54% 19.17% 5.47%
Net profit margin 8.67% 11.03% 11.12% 1.63%
Operating return on assets 11.47% 13.56% 14.68% 4.08%
Return on total assets 6.71% 8.53% 8.52% 1.22%
Return on equity 25.72% 35.59% 41.71% 7.48%

Consolidated Balance Sheets

Consolidated Balance Sheets – USD ($) $ in Millions Dec. 31, 2017 Dec. 31, 2016 Dec. 31, 2015 Dec. 31, 2014
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,814 $ 2,762 $ 1,972 $ 2,088
Short-term investments 825 487 1,465 1,217
Accounts receivable, net of an allowance for uncollectible accounts of $12 and $15 at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively 2,377 2,064 2,020 2,297
Hedge margin receivable 119 925
Fuel inventory 916 519 379 534
Expendable parts and supplies inventories, net of an allowance for obsolescence of $113 and $110 at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively 413 372 318 318
Hedge derivatives asset 1,987 1,078
Prepaid expenses and other 1,499 1,247 796 701
Total current assets 7,844 7,451 9,056 9,158
Property and Equipment, Net:
Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $14,097 and $12,456 at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively 26,563 24,375 23,039 21,929
Other Assets:
Goodwill 9,794 9,794 9,794 9,794
Identifiable intangibles, net of accumulated amortization of $845 and $828 at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively 4,847 4,844 4,861 4,603
Deferred income taxes, net 935 3,064 4,956 7,595
Other noncurrent assets 3,309 1,733 1,428 926
Total other assets 18,885 19,435 21,039 22,918
Total assets 53,292 51,261 53,134 54,005
Current Liabilities:
Current maturities of long-term debt and capital leases 2,242 1,131 1,563 1,184
Air traffic liability 4,888 4,626 4,503 4,296
Accounts payable 3,674 2,572 2,743 2,622
Accrued salaries and related benefits 3,022 2,924 3,195 2,266
Frequent flyer deferred revenue 1,822 1,648 2,581 2,772
Fuel card obligation 1,067 431 1,635 1,580
Other accrued liabilities 1,858 1,907 1,306 2,127
Total current liabilities 18,573 15,239 17,526 16,847
Noncurrent Liabilities:
Long-term debt and capital leases 6,592 6,201 6,766 8,477
Pension, postretirement and related benefits 9,810 13,378 13,855 15,138
Frequent flyer deferred revenue 2,296 2,278 2,246 2,602
Other noncurrent liabilities 2,111 1,878 1,891 2,128
Total noncurrent liabilities 20,809 23,735 24,758 $ 28,345
Commitments and Contingencies
Stockholders’ Equity:
Common stock at $0.0001 par value; 1,500,000,000 shares authorized, 714,674,160 and 744,886,938 shares issued at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively 0 0 0 $ 0
Additional paid-in capital 12,053 12,294 12,936 12,981
Retained earnings 9,636 7,903 5,562 3,456
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (7,621) (7,636) (7,275) (7,311)
Treasury stock, at cost, 7,476,181 and 14,149,229 shares at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively (158) (274) (373) (313)
Total stockholders’ equity 13,910 12,287 10,850 8,813
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ 53,292 $ 51,261 $ 53,134 $ 54,005

Consolidated Statements of Oper

Consolidated Statements of Operations – USD ($) $ in Millions 12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2017 Dec. 31, 2016 Dec. 31, 2015 Dec. 31, 2014
Passenger:
Mainline $ 29,105 $ 28,105 $ 28,898 $ 28,688
Regional carriers 5,714 5,672 5,884 6,266
Total passenger revenue 34,819 33,777 34,782 34,954
Cargo 729 668 813 934
Other 5,696 5,194 5,109 4,474
Total operating revenue 41,244 39,639 40,704 40,362
Operating Expense:
Salaries and related costs 10,436 10,034 8,776 8,120
Aircraft fuel and related taxes 5,733 5,133 6,544 11,668
Regional carriers expense 4,503 4,311 4,241 5,237
Depreciation and amortization 2,235 1,902 1,835 1,771
Contracted services 2,184 1,991 1,848 1,749
Aircraft maintenance materials and outside repairs 1,992 1,823 1,848 1,828
Passenger commissions and other selling expenses 1,787 1,710 1,672 1,700
Landing fees and other rents 1,528 1,490 1,493 1,442
Passenger service 1,067 907 872 810
Profit sharing 1,065 1,115 1,490 1,085
Aircraft rent 351 285 250 233
Other 2,249 1,986 2,033 2,513
Total operating expense 35,130 32,687 32,902 38,156
Operating Income 6,114 6,952 7,802 2,206
Non-Operating Expense:
Interest expense, net (396) (388) (481) (650)
Miscellaneous, net (17) 72 (164) (484)
Total non-operating expense, net (413) (316) (645) (1,134)
Income Before Income Taxes 5,701 6,636 7,157 1,072
Income Tax Provision (2,124) (2,263) (2,631) (413)
Net Income $ 3,577 $ 4,373 $ 4,526 $ 659
Basic Earnings Per Share (usd per share) $ 4.97 $ 5.82 $ 5.68 $ 0.79
Diluted Earnings Per Share (usd per share) 4.95 5.79 5.63 0.78
Cash Dividends Declared Per Share (usd per share) $ 1.02 $ 0.68 $ 0.45 $ 0.30

Consolidated Statements of Cash

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – USD ($) $ in Millions 12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2017 Dec. 31, 2016 Dec. 31, 2015 Dec. 31, 2014
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
Net income $ 3,577 $ 4,373 $ 4,526 $ 659
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 2,235 1,902 1,835 1,771
Hedge derivative contracts (7) (342) (1,366) 2,186
Deferred income taxes 2,071 2,223 2,581 414
Pension, postretirement and postemployment payments greater than expense (3,302) (717) (1,013) (723)
Equity investment earnings (1) (160) (35) 758
Changes in certain assets and liabilities: 268
Receivables (328) (147) (56) 106
Fuel inventory (397) (140) 155
Hedge margin (5) 81 806 (302)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets (57) (26) (102) 62
Air traffic liability 262 123 207 172
Frequent flyer deferred revenue 192 45 (301) (922)
Profit sharing (51) (383) 734 58
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 992 285 (201) 174
Other, net (33) 88 157 (238)
Net cash provided by operating activities 5,148 7,205 7,927 264
Property and equipment additions: (36)
Flight equipment, including advance payments (2,704) (2,617) (2,223) 276
Ground property and equipment, including technology (1,187) (774) (722) 4,947
Purchase of equity investments (1,245) 0 (500)
Purchase of short-term investments (925) (1,707) (998) (1,662)
Redemption of short-term investments 584 2,686 739 (587)
Other, net 111 257 (251) 0
Net cash used in investing activities (5,366) (2,155) (3,955) (1,795)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities: 1,533
Payments on long-term debt and capital lease obligations (1,258) (1,709) (2,558) 0
Repurchase of common stock (1,677) (2,601) (2,200) 0
Cash dividends (731) (509) (359) 48
Fuel card obligation 636 211 (340) (2,463)
Payments on hedge derivative contracts (244) (451) (71)
Proceeds from hedge derivative contracts 20 291 429 (2,928)
Proceeds from long-term obligations 2,454 450 1,038 (1,100)
Other, net 70 58 (27) (251)
Net cash used in financing activities (730) (4,260) (4,088) (41)
Net (Decrease) Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents (948) 790 (116) 0
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 2,762 1,972 2,088 0
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period 1,814 2,762 1,972 1,020
Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Paid for Interest 390 385 452 60
Non-Cash Transactions: (3,240)
Treasury stock contributed to our qualified defined benefit pension plans 350 350 0 (756)
Flight and ground equipment acquired under capital leases 261 86 111 2,844

Consolidated Statements of Stoc

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity – USD ($) shares in Millions, $ in Millions Total Common Stock Additional Paid-In Capital Retained Earnings Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss Treasury Stock
Beginning balance at Dec. 31, 2014 $ 8,813 $ 0 $ 13,621 $ 2,816 $ (7,311) $ (313)
Beginning balance (shares) at Dec. 31, 2014 845 20
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)
Net income 4,526 4,526
Dividends declared (359) (359)
Other comprehensive income (loss) 36 36
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) [1] 16 76 $ (60)
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) (shares) [1] 1 1
Stock options exercised 18 18
Stock options exercised (shares) 2
Stock purchased and retired (2,200) (779) (1,421)
Stock purchased and retired (shares) (48)
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 2015 10,850 $ 0 12,936 5,562 (7,275) $ (373)
Ending balance (shares) at Dec. 31, 2015 800 21
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)
Net income 4,373 4,373
Change in accounting principle 95 95
Dividends declared (509) (509)
Other comprehensive income (loss) (361) (361)
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) [1] 65 105 $ (40)
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) (shares) [1] 2 1
Stock options exercised 32 32
Stock options exercised (shares) 3
Treasury stock, net, contributed to our qualified defined benefit pension plans 343 204 $ 139
Treasury stock, net, contributed to our qualified defined benefit pension plans (shares) (8)
Stock purchased and retired (2,601) (983) (1,618)
Stock purchased and retired (shares) (60)
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 2016 12,287 $ 0 12,294 7,903 (7,636) $ (274)
Ending balance (shares) at Dec. 31, 2016 745 14
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)
Net income 3,577 3,577
Dividends declared (731) (731)
Other comprehensive income (loss) 15 15
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) [1] 68 107 $ (39)
Shares of common stock issued and compensation expense associated with equity awards (Treasury shares withheld for payment of taxes) (shares) [1] 1 1
Stock options exercised 28 28
Stock options exercised (shares) 2
Treasury stock, net, contributed to our qualified defined benefit pension plans 343 188 $ 155
Treasury stock, net, contributed to our qualified defined benefit pension plans (shares) (8)
Stock purchased and retired (1,677) (564) (1,113)
Stock purchased and retired (shares) (33)
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 2017 $ 13,910 $ 0 $ 12,053 $ 9,636 $ (7,621) $ (158)
Ending balance (shares) at Dec. 31, 2017 715 7

Accounting homework help

Total Profit per Region

Region Total Profit
Asia $ 6,113,845.87
Australia and Oceania $ 4,722,160.03
Central America and the Caribbean $ 2,846,907.85
Europe $ 11,082,938.63
Middle East and North Africa $ 5,761,191.86
North America $ 1,457,942.76
Sub-Saharan Africa $ 12,183,211.40

Sales per Month

Sales per Month for Reps
April May June July Total
Minu $10,100 $20,503 $11,312 $18,887 $60,802
Monu $10,100 $20,301 $21,614 $23,735 $75,750
Raju $20,200 $47,600 $28,674 $35,170 $131,644
Tiku $10,300 $9,270 $12,875 $12,978 $45,423

Accounting homework help

CU_Horiz_RGB

CU_Horiz_RGB

Financial Accounting Principles

Assessment 3: Internal Control and Accounting for Assets Worksheet

Use this worksheet to complete the following three exercises for Assessment 3. Refer to the instructions in the course for submitting your assessment.

Exercise 3-1

The Scheiffer Company’s most recent bank statement and book balances of cash reconciliations were completed on September 30, 2012. Two checks were reported outstanding: check #6798 for $1135.50 and check #6794 for $524.00. The following information is available for the October 31, 2012 reconciliation.

Section of the October 31 Bank Statement

Previous Balance

Total Checks & Deposits

Total Deposits & Credits

Current Balance

16,345.50

9,695.55

11,146.85

17,796.80

Checks and Debits

Deposits and Credits

Daily Balance

Date

No.

Amount

Date

Amount

Date

Amount

10/02

6798

1,135.50

10/04

1,214.50

09/30

16,345.50

10/05

7002

815.00

10/11

2,054.55

10/02

15,210.00

10/09

7001

1,788.50

10/20

3,990.25

10/04

16,424.50

10/15

605.75

NSF

10/23

2,436.80

10/05

15,609.50

10/19

7004

954.00

10/29

20.75

IN

10/09

13,821.00

10/22

7003

405.35

10/29

1,430.00

CM

10/11

15,875.55

10/25

7005

1,985.95

10/15

15,269.80

10/26

7007

310.35

10/19

14,315.80

10/30

7009

1,695.15

10/20

18,306.05

10/22

17,900.70

10/23

20,337.50

10/25

18,351.55

10/26

18,041.20

10/29

19,491.95

10/30

17,796.80

From Scheiffer’s Accounting Records

Cash Receipts Deposited

Date

Cash Debit

Oct

4

1,214.50

11

2,054.55

20

3,990.25

23

2,436.80

9,696.10

Cash Disbursements

Check No.

Cash Credit

7001

1,788.50

7002

815.00

7003

405.35

7004

954.00

7005

1,955.95

7006

880.50

7007

310.35

7008

325.10

7009

1,695.15

9,129.90

Cash

Account #101

Date

Explanation

PR

Debit

Credit

Balance

Sep

30

Balance

14,686.00

Oct

31

Total receipts

R12

9,696.10

24,382.10

31

Total disbursements

D23

9,129.90

15,252.20

Check #7005 was drawn correctly for $1985.95 to pay for office equipment. The recordkeeper recorded it as a debit for Office Equipment and a credit to Cash for $1955.95, but misread the amount of the check, which was $1985.95. The non-sufficient funds check for a $605.75 account payment was received from a customer, A. B. Fransen. The company has not yet recorded the returned check. The credit memo is the bank’s collection on a $1450.00 note and shows the deduction of a $20.00 collection fee. The company has not recorded the collection or the fee.

Based on the information provided, complete the following tasks:

Prepare an October 31, 2012, bank reconciliation for the Scheiffer Company.

SCHEIFFER COMPANY

Bank Reconciliation

October 31, 2012

[Create the bank reconciliation here.]

Make the necessary journal entries to adjust the book balance of cash to the reconciled balance.

[Create the journal entries here.]

For distinguished performance, provide three possible reasons why some of the numbered checks in the sequence are missing from the bank statement.

Exercise 3-2

Prepare journal entries for the Russell Company’s 2011 and 2012 transactions summarized below and the company’s year-end adjustments to Bad Debts Expense. Round off all amounts to the nearest dollar.

Note: The company uses a perpetual inventory system.

Summarized Transactions

The Russell Company began operations on January 1, 2011, and completed several transactions that involved credit sales, accounts receivable collections, and bad debts.

2011

Sold merchandize that cost $1,350,000, on credit, for $1,575,000. Terms n/30.

Wrote off $18,100 of accounts receivable that were uncollectible.

Received cash in the amount of $822,500 as accounts receivables payments.

In performing year-end account adjustments, the company estimated that 2 percent of accounts receivables will not be collectible.

[Create the 2011 journal entries here.]

2012

Sold merchandize that cost $1,325,000, on credit, for $1,592,000. Terms n/30.

Wrote off $24,500 of accounts receivable that were uncollectible.

Received cash in the amount of $1,428,300 as accounts receivables payments.

In performing year-end account adjustments, the company estimated that 2 percent of accounts receivables will not be collectible.

[Create the 2012 journal entries here.]

Exercise 3-3

On January 1, the Hanover Beverage Company replaced the palletizing machine on one of its juice lines. The cost of the machine was $195,000. The machine’s expected life is five years or 480,000 units, and its estimated salvage value is $19,500.

The following numbers of units were produced over the next four years:

Year

Units

1

121,000

2

119,500

3

122,600

4

123,000

At the end of the 4th year, the total number of units produced exceeded expectations.

Note: Depreciation cannot drop below its estimated salvage value.

Determine the depreciation on the palletizer for each of the four years, as well as the combined total for all four years. Use two of the following three methods of depreciation. For distinguished performance, use all three methods. Round your answers to the nearest dollar.

Straight-line.

Units-of-production.

Double-declining-balance.

[Provide the depreciation calculations here.]

1

Accounting homework help

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Accounting homework help

Alabama[edit]
Auburn (Auburn University)[1]
Florence (University of North Alabama)
Jacksonville (Jacksonville State University)[2]
Livingston (University of West Alabama)[2]
Montevallo (University of Montevallo)[2]
Troy (Troy University)[2]
Tuscaloosa (University of Alabama, Stillman College, Shelton State)[3][4]
Tuskegee (Tuskegee University)[5]
Alaska[edit]
Fairbanks (University of Alaska Fairbanks)[2]
Arizona[edit]
Flagstaff (Northern Arizona University)[6]
Tempe (Arizona State University)
Tucson (University of Arizona)
Arkansas[edit]
Arkadelphia (Henderson State University, Ouachita Baptist University)[2]
Conway (Central Baptist College, Hendrix College, University of Central Arkansas)[2]
Fayetteville (University of Arkansas)[7]
Jonesboro (Arkansas State University)[8]
Magnolia (Southern Arkansas University)[2]
Monticello (University of Arkansas at Monticello)[2]
Russellville (Arkansas Tech University)[2]
Searcy (Harding University)[5]
California[edit]
Angwin (Pacific Union College)[2]
Arcata (Humboldt State University)[5]
Berkeley (University of California, Berkeley)[5]
Chico (California State University, Chico)[2]
Claremont (Claremont McKenna College, Pomona College, Harvey Mudd College, Scripps College, Pitzer College, Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont Graduate University)[5]
Cotati (California State University, Sonoma)[2]
Davis (University of California, Davis)[1]
Irvine (University of California, Irvine)
Isla Vista (University of California, Santa Barbara)[2]
University Park, Los Angeles (University of Southern California)
Merced (University of California, Merced)
Orange (Chapman University)
Palo Alto (Stanford University)
Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona, WesternU)[9][10][11] and formerly Pomona College
Redlands (University of Redlands)
Riverside (University of California, Riverside, California Baptist University, La Sierra University)
Sacramento (California State University, Sacramento)
University District, San Bernardino (California State University, San Bernardino, American Sports University)
San Diego (University of California, San Diego, San Diego State University)
San Luis Obispo (California Polytechnic State University)[2]
Santa Barbara (Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara City College, University of California, Santa Barbara, Westmont College)[2]
Santa Cruz (University of California, Santa Cruz)[2]
Turlock (California State University, Stanislaus)
Westwood, Los Angeles (University of California, Los Angeles)[2]
Whittier (Whittier CollegeRio Hondo College)
Colorado[edit]
Alamosa (Adams State College)[2]
Boulder (University of Colorado at Boulder)[12]
Durango (Fort Lewis College)[2]
Fort Collins (Colorado State University)[13]
Golden (Colorado School of Mines)
Grand Junction (Colorado Mesa University)
Greeley (University of Northern Colorado)
Gunnison (Western State College)[2]
Pueblo, Colorado (Colorado State University-Pueblo)
Connecticut[edit]
Fairfield (Fairfield University, Sacred Heart University)
Middletown (Wesleyan University)
New Britain (Central Connecticut State University)
New Haven (Yale University, University of New Haven, Southern Connecticut State University, Albertus Magnus College, Quinnipiac University)[14]
New London (Connecticut College, US Coast Guard Academy, Mitchell College)[2]
Storrs (University of Connecticut)[2]
Willimantic (Eastern Connecticut State University)[2]
Delaware[edit]
Dover (Delaware State University)[1]
Newark (University of Delaware)[1]
Florida[edit]
Ave Maria (Ave Maria University)
Boca Raton (Florida Atlantic University)
Coral Gables (University of Miami)
DeLand (Stetson University)[5]
Estero (Florida Gulf Coast University)
Gainesville (University of Florida, Santa Fe College)
Orlando (University of Central Florida)
Sarasota (New College of Florida, Ringling College of Art and Design, State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee)
St. Augustine (Flagler College)
St. Leo (St. Leo University)
Tallahassee (Florida State University, Florida A&M University)
Tampa (University of South Florida)
Georgia[edit]
Albany (Albany State University)
Athens (University of Georgia)[15]
Atlanta (Georgia State University, Georgia Tech, Emory)[2]
Carrollton (University of West Georgia)[2]*Dahlonega (North Georgia College & State University)[2]
Demorest (Piedmont College)[2]
Fort Valley (Fort Valley State University)[2]
Kennesaw (Kennesaw State University)
Milledgeville (Georgia College & State University)[2]
Mount Vernon (Brewton-Parker College)[2]
Oxford (Oxford College)
Rome (Berry College, Shorter University)
Savannah (Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah State University, Savannah College of Art and Design)
Statesboro (Georgia Southern University)[5]
Valdosta (Valdosta State University)[2]
Waleska (Reinhardt College)[2]
Young Harris (Young Harris College)[2]
Hawaii[edit]
Manoa (University of Hawaii at Manoa)[2]
Idaho[edit]
Moscow (University of Idaho)[2]
Pocatello (Idaho State University)[2]
Rexburg (BYU-Idaho)[2]
Illinois[edit]
Carbondale (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)[5]
Champaign–Urbana (University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)[5]
Charleston (Eastern Illinois University)[2]
DeKalb (Northern Illinois University)[2]
Edwardsville (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)[2]
Evanston (Northwestern University)[2]
Lebanon (McKendree University)[2]
Macomb (Western Illinois University)[2]
Normal (Illinois State University)[2]
Peoria (Bradley University)
Indiana[edit]
Bloomington (Indiana University Bloomington)[5]
Crawfordsville (Wabash College)
Greencastle (DePauw University)[5]
Hanover (Hanover College)[2]
Marion (Indiana Wesleyan University)[2]
Muncie (Ball State University)[2]
Oakland City (Oakland City University)[2]
Richmond (Earlham College)[2]
South Bend (Notre Dame University[2])
Terre Haute (Indiana State University, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology)[2]
Upland (Taylor University)[2]
Valparaiso (Valparaiso University)
West Lafayette (Purdue University)[2]
Iowa[edit]
Ames (Iowa State University)[2]
Cedar Falls (University of Northern Iowa)[2]
Cedar Rapids, Iowa (Coe College )
Decorah (Luther College)[5]
Fayette (Upper Iowa University)[2]
Grinnell (Grinnell College)[15]
Iowa City (University of Iowa)[15]
Lamoni (Graceland University)[2]
Mount Vernon, (Cornell College)
Orange City (Northwestern College)[2]
Sioux Center (Dordt College)[2]
Storm Lake (Buena Vista University)[2]
Waverly (Wartburg College)[2]
Kansas[edit]
Baldwin City (Baker University)[5]
Emporia (Emporia State University)[2]
Hays (Fort Hays State University)[2]
Lawrence (University of Kansas, Haskell Indian Nations University)[15]
Manhattan (Kansas State University, Manhattan Christian College)[15]
Pittsburg (Pittsburg State University)[2]
Kentucky[edit]
Bowling Green (Western Kentucky University)[2]
Columbia (Lindsey Wilson College)[2]
Georgetown (Georgetown College)
Highland Heights (Northern Kentucky University)
Lexington (University of Kentucky, Transylvania University[5]
Louisville (University of Louisville)
Morehead (Morehead State University)[2]
Murray (Murray State University)[5]
Richmond (Eastern Kentucky University)[2]
Williamsburg (University of the Cumberlands)[2]
Wilmore (Asbury University, Asbury Theological Seminary)[2]
Louisiana[edit]
Baton Rouge (Louisiana State University, Southern University)
Grambling (Grambling State University)[5]
Hammond (Southeastern Louisiana University)[2]
Lafayette (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Monroe (University of Louisiana at Monroe)[2]
Natchitoches (Northwestern State University)[2]
Ruston (Louisiana Tech University)[2]
Thibodaux (Nicholls State University)[2]
Maine[edit]
Augusta (University of Maine at Augusta)[2]
Bar Harbor (College of the Atlantic)
Brunswick (Bowdoin College)
Farmington (University of Maine at Farmington)[2]
Fort Kent (University of Maine at Fort Kent)
Gorham (University of Southern Maine)[2]
Lewiston, Maine (Bates College)
Orono (University of Maine)[2]
Waterville (Thomas College, Colby College)
Maryland[edit]
Annapolis (United States Naval Academy, St. John’s College)
Chestertown (Washington College)[2]
College Park (University of Maryland, College Park)[16]
Cumberland (Allegany College of Maryland)
Emmitsburg (Mount St. Mary’s University)[2]
Frostburg (Frostburg State University)[5]
Princess Anne (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)[5]
Towson (Towson University, Goucher College)[2]
Salisbury (Salisbury University)[2]
Westminster (McDaniel College)
Massachusetts[edit]
Boston (Boston University, Boston College, Boston Conservatory, New England Conservatory, Brandeis University, Northeastern University, UMass Boston, Emmanuel College, Bunker Hill Community College, Roxbury Community College, Suffolk University, Simmons College, among many others)
Bridgewater (Bridgewater State College)[2]
Cambridge (Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)(Lesley University, Cambridge College, Longy School of Music)[15]
Chestnut Hill (Boston College)
The Colleges of Worcester Consortium:
Dudley (Nichols College)
North Grafton (Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University)
Paxton (Anna Maria College)
Worcester (Assumption, Becker, Clark University, Holy Cross, Mass. College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Quinsigamond Community College, UMass Medical School, Worcester State University, Worcester Polytechnic Institute)
The Five College Region of Western Massachusetts:
Amherst (Amherst College, Hampshire College, University of Massachusetts Amherst)[15]
Northampton (Smith College)
South Hadley (Mount Holyoke College)
Fitchburg (Fitchburg State College)
North Adams (Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts)
Springfield (American International College), (Springfield College), and (Western New England College)
Waltham (Bentley University), (Brandeis University)
Williamstown (Williams College)
Framingham (Framingham State University)
Michigan[edit]
Adrian (Adrian College, Siena Heights University)
Albion (Albion College)[17]
Allendale (Grand Valley State University)
Alma (Alma College)
Ann Arbor (University of Michigan)[1]
Berrien Springs (Andrews University)[2]
Big Rapids (Ferris State University)[2]
East Lansing (Michigan State University)[2]
Flint (Kettering University, University of Michigan-Flint)
Hillsdale (Hillsdale College)
Houghton (Michigan Technological University)[5]
Kalamazoo (Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College)[2]
Marquette (Northern Michigan University)[2]
Midland (Northwood University)
Mount Pleasant (Central Michigan University)[2]
Olivet (Olivet College)[2]
Saginaw (Saginaw Valley State University)
Sault Ste. Marie (Lake Superior State University)
Spring Arbor (Spring Arbor University)[2]
Ypsilanti (Eastern Michigan University)[2]
Minnesota[edit]
Bemidji (Bemidji State University)[2]
Crookston (University of Minnesota Crookston)[2]
Duluth (University of Minnesota Duluth, Lake Superior College, The College of St. Scholastica, University of Wisconsin–Superior, Duluth Business University
Faribault, South Central College
Mankato (Minnesota State University, Mankato),[2] Bethany Lutheran College
Marshall (Southwest Minnesota State University)[2]
Moorhead (Minnesota State University, Moorhead, Concordia College)[18]
Morris (University of Minnesota Morris)[2]
Northfield (Carleton College, St. Olaf College)[5]
North Mankato, South Central College
St. Cloud (St. Cloud State University, The College of St. Scholastica)[2]
St. Joseph (College of Saint Benedict)[2]
St. Peter (Gustavus Adolphus College)[2]
Winona (Winona State University, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota)[19]
Mississippi[edit]
Cleveland (Delta State University)[2]
Hattiesburg (University of Southern Mississippi)[20]
Itta Bena (Mississippi Valley State University)[2]
Oxford (University of Mississippi)[2]
Starkville (Mississippi State University)[2]
Missouri[edit]
Bolivar (Southwest Baptist University)[2]
Cape Girardeau (Southeast Missouri State University)[2]
Columbia (University of Missouri, Stephens College, Columbia College)[20]
Fayette (Central Methodist University)[2]
Fulton (Westminster College and William Woods University).
Kirksville (Truman State University, A. T. Still University)[2]
Maryville (Northwest Missouri State University)[2]
Rolla (Missouri University of Science and Technology)[2]
Warrensburg (University of Central Missouri)[5]
Montana[edit]
Bozeman (Montana State University)[2]
Dillon (University of Montana Western)[2]
Missoula (University of Montana)[5]
Nebraska[edit]
Chadron (Chadron State College)[5]
Crete (Doane College)[2]
Kearney (University of Nebraska at Kearney)[2]
Lincoln (University of Nebraska at Lincoln)[5]
Peru (Peru State College)[2]
Seward (Concordia University)[2]
Wayne (Wayne State College)[2]
Nevada[edit]
Las Vegas (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
Reno (University of Nevada, Reno)
New Hampshire[edit]
New London, New Hampshire (Colby-Sawyer College)
Durham (University of New Hampshire)[2]
Hanover (Dartmouth College)[5]
Henniker (New England College)
Keene (Keene State College)[2]
Plymouth (Plymouth State University)[2]
Rindge (Franklin Pierce University)
New Jersey[edit]
Ewing (The College of New Jersey), (Rider University)
Jersey City (New Jersey City University), (Saint Peter’s University)
Glassboro (Rowan University)[2]
Hoboken (Stevens Institute of Technology)
Madison (Drew University), (Fairleigh Dickinson University), (College of Saint Elizabeth)
Newark (Rutgers University), (New Jersey Institute of Technology), (UMDNJ)
New Brunswick (Rutgers University)[5]
Princeton (Princeton University)[5]
Union (Kean University)
West Long Branch (Monmouth University)
New Mexico[edit]
Hobbs (University of the Southwest)[2]
Las Cruces (New Mexico State University)[2]
Las Vegas (New Mexico Highlands University)[2]
Portales (Eastern New Mexico University)[2]
Silver City (Western New Mexico University)[2]
New York[edit]
Alfred (Alfred University, Alfred State College)[2]
Albany (SUNY Albany, Siena College, Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany Law School, Albany Medical College, College of Saint Rose, Excelsior College, Maria College of Albany, Mildred Elley, Sage College of Albany)
Aurora (Wells College)[21]
Binghamton (Binghamton University)[2]
Brockport (SUNY Brockport)[5]
Buffalo (University at Buffalo)
Canton (St. Lawrence University, SUNY Canton)[2]
Clinton (Hamilton College)[2]
Cobleskill (SUNY Cobleskill)[2]
Delhi (SUNY Delhi)[2]
Fredonia (SUNY Fredonia)[2]
Geneseo (SUNY Geneseo)[2]
Geneva (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
Hamilton (Colgate University)[2]
Ithaca (Cornell University, Ithaca College)[1]
Morningside Heights, Manhattan (Columbia University, Barnard College, Teachers College, Manhattan School of Music, Jewish Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, Bank Street College of Education)
New Paltz (SUNY New Paltz)[2]
Oneonta (SUNY Oneonta, Hartwick College)[2]
Oswego (SUNY Oswego)[2]
Plattsburgh (SUNY Plattsburgh)[2]
Potsdam (SUNY Potsdam, Clarkson University)[2]
Poughkeepsie (Vassar College, Marist College)[2]
Purchase (Purchase College, Manhattanville College)[2]
Rochester (University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology, Nazareth College, St. John Fisher College, Monroe Community College, Roberts Wesleyan College, SUNY Brockport, SUNY Empire State College)[2]
Saratoga Springs (Skidmore College)[2]
Seneca Falls (New York Chiropractic College)
Stony Brook (Stony Brook University)
Syracuse (Syracuse University, SUNY ESF, Upstate Medical University)
Tivoli (Bard College)
Troy (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Russell Sage College, Hudson Valley Community College)
West Point (United States Military Academy)
North Carolina[edit]
Banner Elk (Lees-McRae College)
Boiling Springs (Gardner-Webb University)[2]
Boone (Appalachian State University)[2]
Buies Creek (Campbell University)[2]
Chapel Hill (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)[20]
Cullowhee (Western Carolina University)[2]
Davidson (Davidson College)[5]
Durham (Duke University, North Carolina Central University)[5]
Elon (Elon University)[2]
Greensboro (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro College, Guilford College, North Carolina A & T State University, Bennett College)
Greenville (East Carolina University)[2]
Hickory (Lenoir-Rhyne University)[2]
Mars Hill (Mars Hill College)[2]
Mount Olive (Mount Olive College)[2]
Pembroke (University of North Carolina at Pembroke)[2]
Wilmington, North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)
Wingate (Wingate University)[2]
Winston-Salem (Wake Forest University, University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Salem College, Winston-Salem State University)
North Dakota[edit]
Fargo (North Dakota State University)[18]
Grand Forks (University of North Dakota)[5]
Ohio[edit]
Ada (Ohio Northern University)[2]
Alliance (University of Mount Union)
Ashland (Ashland University)[2]
Athens (Ohio University)[2]
Berea (Baldwin Wallace College)
Bluffton (Bluffton University)[2]
Bowling Green (Bowling Green State University)[2]
Cedarville (Cedarville University)[2]
Columbus (Ohio State University)
Delaware (Ohio Wesleyan University)
Fairborn (Wright State University)
Findlay (University of Findlay)
Gambier (Kenyon College)[2]
Granville (Denison University)[2]
Hiram (Hiram College)[2]
Kent (Kent State University)[2]
Nelsonville (Hocking College)[2]
New Concord (Muskingum College)[2]
Oberlin (Oberlin College)[5]
Oxford (Miami University)[5]
Rio Grande (University of Rio Grande)[2]
Wilberforce (Wilberforce University, Central State University)[2]
Oklahoma[edit]
Ada (East Central University)[2]
Alva (Northwestern Oklahoma State University)[2]
Durant (Southeastern Oklahoma State University)[2]
Edmond (University of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma Christian University)[2]
Goodwell (Oklahoma Panhandle State University)[2]
Langston (Langston University)[5]
Norman (University of Oklahoma)[1]
Stillwater (Oklahoma State University)[5]
Tahlequah (Northeastern State University)[2]
Tulsa (The University of Tulsa)
Weatherford (Southwestern Oklahoma State University)
Oregon[edit]
Ashland (Southern Oregon University)[2]
Corvallis (Oregon State University)[20]
Eugene (Lane Community College, Northwest Christian University, University of Oregon)[20]
Forest Grove (Pacific University)
Klamath Falls (Klamath Community College, Oregon Institute of Technology)
La Grande (Eastern Oregon University)[2]
Marylhurst (Marylhurst University)
McMinnville (Linfield College)
Monmouth (Western Oregon University)[2]
Newberg (George Fox University)
Pennsylvania[edit]
Altoona (Penn State Altoona)
Annville (Lebanon Valley College)[2]
Bethlehem (Lehigh University, Moravian College)
Bloomsburg (Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Bradford (University of Pittsburgh at Bradford)
California (California University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Carlisle (Dickinson College)
Cecil B. Moore, Philadelphia, also known as “Templetown” (Temple University)
Clarion (Clarion University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Collegeville (Ursinus College)
Cresson (Mount Aloysius College)[2]
East Stroudsburg (East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Edinboro (Edinboro University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Erie (Gannon University, Mercyhurst College, Penn State Erie)
Gettysburg (Gettysburg College)[2]
Greensburg (Seton Hill University, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg)
Grove City (Grove City College)[2]
Huntingdon (Juniata College)[2]
Indiana (Indiana University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Johnstown (University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown)
Kutztown (Kutztown University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Lancaster (Franklin & Marshall)
Lewisburg (Bucknell University)[5]
Lock Haven (Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Loretto (St. Francis University)[2]
Mansfield (Mansfield University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Meadville (Allegheny College)
Mont Alto (Penn State Mont Alto)
Millersville (Millersville University of Pennsylvania)[2]
New Wilmington (Westminster College)[2]
North East (Mercyhurst North East)
University City, Philadelphia (Drexel University, University of Pennsylvania, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia)
Oakland, Pittsburgh (Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, Carlow University)
Reading (Albright College, Alvernia University, Penn State Berks)
Selinsgrove (Susquehanna University)[2]
Shippensburg (Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Slippery Rock (Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania)[2]
State College (Pennsylvania State University)[22]
Villanova (Villanova University)
Waynesburg (Waynesburg University)
West Chester (West Chester University of Pennsylvania)
Wilkes-Barre (King’s College, Wilkes University)
Williamsport (Lycoming College, Pennsylvania College of Technology)[2]
Rhode Island[edit]
Kingston (University of Rhode Island)[2]
Providence (Brown University, (University of Rhode Island), Rhode Island School of Design, Johnson and Wales University, Providence College, Community College of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College, and Roger Williams University.)
South Carolina[edit]
Central (Southern Wesleyan University)[2]
Charleston (College of Charleston, The Citadel, MUSC)
Clemson (Clemson University)[2]
Clinton (Presbyterian College)
Columbia (University of South Carolina)[14]
Due West (Erskine College)
Florence (Francis Marion University)
Greenwood (Lander University)
Orangeburg (South Carolina State University, Claflin University)[2]
Rock Hill (Winthrop University)
Spartanburg (Wofford College, Converse College, University of South Carolina Upstate, Spartanburg Methodist College, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Spartanburg Community College, Virginia College, Sherman College of Chiropractic)
South Dakota[edit]
Brookings (South Dakota State University)[2]
Madison (Dakota State University)
Spearfish (Black Hills State University)
Vermillion (University of South Dakota)[5]
Tennessee[edit]
Chattanooga (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
Collegedale (Southern Adventist University)
Cookeville (Tennessee Technological University)[2]
Harrogate (Lincoln Memorial University)[2]
Henderson (Freed-Hardeman University)[2]
Johnson City (East Tennessee State University)
Knoxville (University of Tennessee)
Martin (University of Tennessee at Martin)[2]
McKenzie (Bethel University)[2]
Memphis (Christian Brothers University, LeMoyne-Owen College, Memphis College of Art, Memphis Theological Seminary, Rhodes College, Southern College of Optometry, Southwest Tennessee Community College, University of Memphis, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Visible Music College)
Murfreesboro (Middle Tennessee State University)[2]
Nashville (Vanderbilt University, Belmont University, Tennessee State University, Lipscomb University, Fisk University, Aquinas College, Trevecca Nazarene University)
Sewanee (Sewanee: the University of the South)[2]
Texas[edit]
Abilene (Abilene Christian University, Hardin-Simmons University, McMurry University)
Alpine (Sul Ross State University)[2]
Austin (University of Texas at Austin, St. Edwards University, Huston-Tillotson University)[2]
Beaumont (Lamar University)
Canyon (West Texas A&M University)[2]
College Station (Texas A&M University)[5]
Commerce (Texas A&M University–Commerce)[2]
Dallas (Southern Methodist University)
Denton (University of North Texas, Texas Woman’s University)[2]
Fort Worth (Texas Christian University, Texas Wesleyan University)
Georgetown (Southwestern University)
Huntsville (Sam Houston State University)[2]
Houston (University of Houston, Texas Southern University, Rice University, Houston Baptist University)
Keene (Southwestern Adventist University)[2]
Kingsville (Texas A&M University–Kingsville)[2]
Lubbock (Texas Tech University, Lubbock Christian University)
Nacogdoches (Stephen F. Austin State University)[2]
Plainview (Wayland Baptist University)[2]
Prairie View (Prairie View A&M University)[2]
San Marcos (Texas State University)[5]
Stephenville (Tarleton State University)[2]
Waco (Baylor University)
Utah[edit]
Cedar City (Southern Utah University)[2]
Logan (Utah State University)[2]
Provo (Brigham Young University)[5]
Orem (Utah Valley University)
Salt Lake City (University of Utah)
Ephraim (Snow College)
Vermont[edit]
Burlington (University of Vermont, Champlain College and Saint Michael’s College)[2]
Castleton (Castleton State College)[2]
Johnson (Johnson State College)[2]
Lyndonville (Lyndon State College)[2]
Middlebury (Middlebury College)[2]
Northfield (Norwich University)[2]
Virginia[edit]
Blacksburg (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)[5]
Bridgewater (Bridgewater College)[2]
Charlottesville (University of Virginia)[23]
Farmville (Longwood University, Hampden-Sydney College)[2]
Fredericksburg (University of Mary Washington)[2]
Harrisonburg (James Madison University, Eastern Mennonite University)[2]
Lexington (Washington and Lee University, Virginia Military Institute)[2]
Lynchburg (Lynchburg College, Randolph College, Liberty University, Central Virginia Community College)
Radford (Radford University)[2]
Williamsburg (The College of William & Mary)[2]
Wise (University of Virginia’s College at Wise)[2]
Chesapeake (Averett University, DeVry University, Troy University, Tidewater Community College, Strayer University, Everest University, Sentera College of Health Sciences, St Leo University)[2]
Washington[edit]
Bellingham (Western Washington University)
Cheney (Eastern Washington University)[2]
Ellensburg (Central Washington University)[5]
Pullman (Washington State University)[5]
University District, Seattle (University of Washington)[5]
West Virginia[edit]
Athens (Concord University)[2]
Buckhannon (West Virginia Wesleyan College)[2]
Fairmont (Fairmont State University)[2]
Glenville (Glenville State College)[2]
Huntington (Marshall University)[2]
Montgomery (West Virginia University Institute of Technology)[2]
Morgantown (West Virginia University)[2]
Shepherdstown (Shepherd University)[2]
West Liberty (West Liberty University)[2]
Wisconsin[edit]
Appleton (Lawrence University)
Eau Claire (University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire)
Green Bay (University of Wisconsin-Green Bay)
La Crosse (University of Wisconsin–La Crosse, Western Technical College, Viterbo University)[2]
Madison (University of Wisconsin–Madison)[2]
Menomonie (University of Wisconsin–Stout)[2]
Milwaukee (Marquette University, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)
Oshkosh (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)
Platteville (University of Wisconsin–Platteville)[2]
River Falls (University of Wisconsin–River Falls)[2]
Stevens Point (University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point)[2]
Waukesha (Carroll University)
Whitewater (University of Wisconsin–Whitewater)[2]
Wyoming[edit]
Laramie (University of Wyoming)[5]

Accounting homework help

FIN 510 / FIN 205

Assignment

Marks: 30 (15% weight of total assessment)

Problem 1:
Choose a publicly traded company from the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX).
Provide the following information of your chosen company and what is the product or service
the company produce? 02 Marks

Company Name:

Stock Ticker Symbol:

Stock Information:

Most recent price

Market capitalization

Daily volume

Number of ordinary
securities published
on ASX

Most recent dividend

Annual dividend yield

P/E ratio

EPS

Company Description:

How to answer this question?

Choose a company from the link bellow.
https://www.asx.com.au/asx/research/listedCompanies.do
Click on the Key statistics and note down as required in question 1.

Problem 2:

Find the beta of the stock from January 2017 till March 2022 (download weekly price
information) from the yahoo finance and write a summary of your analysis indicating the stock
price trend during the analysis period.

08 Marks

How to answer this question?

Steps in downloading stock price from https://au.finance.yahoo.com/

a. Type the name of your chosen company in yahoo finance search option

b. Click on the historical data

c. Choose time for 5 years data (for example 1 January 2017 – 31 March 2022) period.

d. Show: historical price, Frequency: Weekly

e. Download the excel spread sheet and save it.

f. Keep date and Adj closing price columns and delete open, high, low and volume

columns.

g. Now go back to yahoo finance home page and click on the ASX 200 stock index. Then

click on the historical data and collect data for the same for the stated periods (weekly

data) for the ASX 200 index.

h. Download the ASX 200 index data and only choose Adj closing price. Copy Adj closing

price and past it next to your chosen company’s stock price. Follow the above two

videos to collect data for your chosen company and ASX 200 index.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Byx4hQ0IRrM&t=276s
i. Now arrange the data in 3 columns in you excel file. Column 1 (date), column 2 (your

chosen company’s adjusted closing price, ASX200 adjusted closing price. Now select
the data in 3 columns and click data icon in you excel sheet and then click Z to A
arrow sign to arrange data from 2022 to 2017 period.

j. Now compute returns (returnt = (Pt – Pt-1)/Pt-1 ) of the chosen stock and ASX 200

index for the stated (weekly data) period.

Variables
Your chosen company

(1 January 2017 – 31
March 2022)

ASX 200
(1 January 2017 –
31 March 2022)

Return (most
recent period)

Mean (average
returns)

Variance

Standard
Deviation

*Slope (Beta)

*Slope = covariance (returns of X company, returns of ASX 200)/ variance of ASX
returns. You can either type (=slope (return of X, Returns of ASX 200) in excel or the
above slope formula.

J. Now calculate beta by regressing the share’s returns on the returns to the index
chosen. Report both excel results and regression result with beta. Your calculated slope
and beta will be exactly the same. Copy the regression table from the excel sheet and
paste it on your assignment word file. For regression analysis, you have to use the
analysis tool pack available in excel.

Problem 3:

Now calculate the information required in Problem 2 to check the impact of COVID 19 on your
chosen company from 1st March 2020 to August 2021 period and discuss the changes during
the COVID 19 period only. 04 Marks

How to answer this question?

Repeat the procedure of problem 2 for the COVID 19 period (from 1st March 2020 to March
2022 period) only and then explain your analysis. You may compare the beta calculated in
problem 3 with the beta of COVID 19 period. You may also include the company specific factors

(sales, export, production, supply chain etc) that has been impacted by COVID 19 and their
related impact on stock price performance. Try to enrich your answer with related factors you
think has had an impact on stock.

Problem 4:

Collect the 5 years period dividends information of the company from the yahoo finance
website.

Calculate dividends growth rate and the return on share investment. 05 Marks

Dividends Growth Rates {(D1 – D0)/D0} Annual rate of return using Gordon Model
(P0 = D1/r-g)

2022 (D6)

2021 (D5)

2020 (D4)

2019 (D3)

2018 (D2)

2017 (D1)

2016 (D0)

For stock price information (P0) check yahoo finance. You can do this section along with

question number 2

Problem 5:

Now visualize the analyses you did in solving problem 2, 3 and 4 in graphs and charts by using
Microsoft power BI software. 9 Marks

How to solve:

To solve the problems, follow the solution video uploaded in Learnline.

Problem 6:

Now prepare the presentation of your assignment with a power point file with audio (maximum
5 minutes). 02 marks

Explain the result of problem 4 and 5 on power point slides (2 to 3 slides) and record your audio
on power point. Now upload the recorded power point file to student media upload on Learnline.

Check the link for adding audio on your power point slides

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/video-add-and-record-audio-eeac1757-5f20-4379-
95f2-0d0cd151d5b8

You are required to submit assignment files (word file, excel file, power BI file and PowerPoint
with audit) by the submission deadline of 20 May, Friday, 5.00 pm (Darwin time).

Strategies for finishing the assignment on time:

1. Choose a company following the selection criteria. Once you have selected a

company, declare the company name in the FIN 510/FIN 205 forum with your
student ID (in the forum write student ID and name of your selected company) so
that other students do not select the same company. Before choosing a company
check the FIN 510/ FIN 205 assignment forum whether your chosen company has
been selected by others.

2. Read about the company from ASX and company’s website.
3. Complete assignment questions step by step and check if you are in right direction

according the requirements of the questions. Make sure you practice excel while
doing this assignment.

4. Finalize word file (12 font, calibri (body), line spacing single).
5. Finalize excel file with regression results. Upload both the excel file and the

assignment file via assignment submission point. (Please keep a copy of yours excel
sheet as a future reference. I might ask you to send me a copy of yours excel file).

6. Proof-read your assignment prior to the submission.
7. Submit the assignment prior to the submission deadline. Make sure you have

submitted the assignment on time, as there will be penalty for late submission.
8. Attend or listen to the recorded session on how to prepare your assignment.

Accounting homework help

Submit a 4- 5-pages executive summary of internship experience.

Internship position: Assistant of Financial Aid Counselor


My Primary information:

1. Functions/Description work on Financial Aid department, that they provide: 

• Process financial aid applications to determine financial aid eligibility, which includes performing federal verification
• Review that awarded financial aid is  disbursed and credited to the students’ account; identifies problems related to award delivery and communicates with the appropriate individual or department for resolution.
• Assist and consider appropriate action for invalid or incomplete student financial aid applications.
• Assist with review and process Federal Work Study (FWS) contracts/timesheets for timely payment of earnings to students and train FWS supervisors on FWS guidelines and processes.
• Assist with the implementation of the Financial Literacy/Default Prevention Program to promote responsible borrowing, budgeting, and repayment of loans upon graduation.

2. My typical internship day on the job:

My workday starts at 9:00am. Firstly, I’m turn on computer and check a voice message on phone. I’m take a note and write down an info to who we (me or my supervisor) need to call back. Some problems I try to figurate by myself for example if student call and ask, “What exactly info he need to provide to apply a 2022-2023 FAFSA.” this question I will figure out by myself, and I doesn’t need to bother my supervisor.

Today (April 25), I have two new students.

One of them is a freshman student, I have already spoke with him and consulting his before by phone, what documents he need to bring to complete 2022-2023 FAFSA. When he come, I checked all documents that he brings and we starting to apply on 2022-2023 FAFSA. I helped him with application, and everything go through. No issue was found when we complete application. We received a confirmation that cover a full grand for 2022-2023 FAFSA. After this, he can go to advisor office and schedule classes for Fall 2022 semester

Second student, he is a walk-in student, and I gave a consultation by person for a future what he needs to apply the 2022-2023 FAFSA. From his word, his parents have a big income, and I with my supervisor explained him that he couldn’t be receive a full grand, but any whey we need to try to apply a FAFSA 2022-2023. Other way that we can help him if we can try to apply a loan and he can start in Full 2022 semester. He will be thinking about this and will call us back.

After students left, I continue to call a students and check some voice messages and try to figure out a solve problems that they have. Also, by the end of the day, I contact and schedule/confirmed appointments with student for my other workday and then I know who will come and I will be prepared to visits.

Additional info to help write essay:

1. What Does a Financial Aid Assistant Do: As a financial aid assistant, your responsibilities are to assess students’ financial aid applications and make recommendations. You may also help to compile a financial aid package for the students. You review and verify all of the student’s financial documents to determine their current financial situation. You may interview the applicant or their family and communicate with them about the status of their application. You also provide the applicants with information about different forms of aid, such as Pell grants, work-study programs, or college grants, for example. This job may require database maintenance as well.

2. What Are Financial Aid Jobs: There are several different types of jobs categorized under financial aid jobs. One variety is any job that a student performs as part of their financial aid package. These are also known as work-study jobs, and they can range from working in the cafeteria or bookstore to working the circulation desk at the college library. Since the positions can vary significantly, the job duties in this field are not definite. Financial aid jobs can also refer to the people who assist students in financing their college tuition by securing financial aid, such as federal loans, scholarships, and work-study jobs. Qualifications for working in a financial aid office vary depending on position.

Accounting homework help

Florida National University NUR4287

Course Reflection

Guidelines

Purpose

The purpose of this assignment is to provide the student an opportunity to reflect on selected RN-BSN competencies acquired through the NUR4287 course.

Course Outcomes

This assignment provides documentation of student ability to meet the following course outcomes:

· The students will identify the physiological process of aging.

· The students will be able to differentiate the adaptative human response to the aging process.

· The student will be able to manage and care older adults and their families.

Points

This assignment is worth a total of 20%.

Due Date

Submit your completed assignment under the Assignment tab by SUNDAY 11:59 p.m. EST of Week 7 as directed.

Requirements

1. The Course Reflection is worth 20% and will be graded on quality of self-assessment, use of citations, use of Standard English grammar, sentence structure, and overall organization based on the required components as summarized in the directions and grading criteria/rubric.

2. Follow the directions and grading criteria closely. Any questions about your essay may be posted under the Q & A forum under the Discussions tab.

3. The length of the reflection is to be within three to six pages excluding title page and reference pages.

4. APA format is required with both a title page and reference page. Use the required components of the review as Level 1 headers (upper and lower case, centered):

Note: Introduction – Write an introduction but do not use “Introduction” as a heading in accordance with the rules put forth in the Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (2010, p. 63).

a. Course Reflection

b. Conclusion

Preparing Your Reflection

The BSN Essentials (AACN, 2008) outline a number of healthcare policy and advocacy competencies for the BSN-prepared nurse. Reflect on the NUR4287 course readings, discussion threads, and applications you have completed across this course and write a reflective essay regarding the extent to which you feel you are now prepared to (choose 3):

1. “Conduct comprehensive and focused physical, behavioral, psychological, spiritual, socioeconomic, and environmental assessments of health and illness parameters in patients, using developmentally and culturally appropriate approaches.

2. Recognize the relationship of genetics and genomics to health, prevention, screening, diagnostics, prognostics, selection of treatment, and monitoring of treatment effectiveness, using a constructed pedigree from collected family history information as well as standardized symbols and terminology.

3. Implement holistic, patient centered care that reflects an understanding of human growth and development, pathophysiology, pharmacology, medical management, and nursing management across the health illness continuum, across the lifespan, and in all healthcare settings.

4. Communicate effectively with all members of the healthcare team, including the patient and the patient’s support network.

5. Deliver compassionate, patient centered, evidence-based care that respects patient and family preferences.

6. Implement patient and family care around resolution of end of life and palliative care issues, such as symptom management, support of rituals, and respect for patient and family preferences.

7. Provide appropriate patient teaching that reflects developmental stage, age, culture, spirituality, patient preferences, and health literacy considerations to foster patient engagement in their care.

8. Implement evidence-based nursing interventions as appropriate for managing the acute and chronic care of patients and promoting health across the lifespan.

9. Monitor client outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of psychobiological interventions.

10. Facilitate patient centered transitions of care, including discharge planning and ensuring the caregiver’s knowledge of care requirements to promote safe care.

11. Provide nursing care based on evidence that contributes to safe and high-quality patient outcomes within healthcare microsystems.

12. Create a safe care environment that results in high quality patient outcomes.

13. Revise the plan of care based on an ongoing evaluation of patient outcomes.

14. Demonstrate clinical judgment and accountability for patient outcomes when delegating to and supervising other members of the healthcare team.

15. Manage care to maximize health, independence, and quality of life for a group of individuals that approximates a beginning practitioner’s workload 

16. Demonstrate the application of psychomotor skills for the efficient, safe, and compassionate delivery of patient care.

17. Develop a beginning understanding of complementary and alternative modalities and their role in health care. 

18. Develop an awareness of patients as well as healthcare professionals’ spiritual beliefs and values and how those beliefs and values impact health care.

19. Manage the interaction of multiple functional problems affecting patients across the lifespan, including common geriatric syndromes.

20. Understand one’s role and participation in emergency preparedness and disaster response with an awareness of environmental factors and the risks they pose to self and patients

21. Engage in caring and healing techniques that promote a therapeutic nurse patient relationship.

22. Demonstrate tolerance for the ambiguity and unpredictability of the world and its effect on the healthcare system as related to nursing practice.” (pp. 31-32).

Reference:

American Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN]. (2008). The essentials of baccalaureate education for professional nursing practice. Washington, DC: Author.

Directions and Grading Criteria

Category

Points

%

Description

(Introduction – see note under requirement #4 above)

8

8

Introduces the purpose of the reflection and addresses BSN Essentials (AACN, 2008) pertinent to healthcare policy and advocacy.

You Decide Reflection

80

80

Include a self-assessment regarding learning that you believe represents your skills, knowledge, and integrative abilities to meet the pertinent BSN Essential and sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) as a result of active learning throughout this course. Be sure to use examples from selected readings, threaded discussions, and/or applications to support your assertions to address four of the following sub-competencies:

(a) “Conduct comprehensive and focused physical, behavioral, psychological, spiritual, socioeconomic, and environmental assessments of health and illness parameters in patients, using developmentally and culturally appropriate approaches.

(b) Recognize the relationship of genetics and genomics to health, prevention, screening, diagnostics, prognostics, selection of treatment, and monitoring of treatment effectiveness, using a constructed pedigree from collected family history information as well as standardized symbols and terminology.

(c) Implement holistic, patient centered care that reflects an understanding of human growth and development, pathophysiology, pharmacology, medical management, and nursing management across the health illness continuum, across the lifespan, and in all healthcare settings.

(d) Communicate effectively with all members of the healthcare team, including the patient and the patient’s support network.

(e) Deliver compassionate, patient centered, evidence-based care that respects patient and family preferences.

(f) Implement patient and family care around resolution of end of life and palliative care issues, such as symptom management, support of rituals, and respect for patient and family preferences.

(g) Provide appropriate patient teaching that reflects developmental stage, age, culture, spirituality, patient preferences, and health literacy considerations to foster patient engagement in their care.

(h) Implement evidence-based nursing interventions as appropriate for managing the acute and chronic care of patients and promoting health across the lifespan.

(i) Monitor client outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of psychobiological interventions.

(j) Facilitate patient centered transitions of care, including discharge planning and ensuring the caregiver’s knowledge of care requirements to promote safe care.

(k) Provide nursing care based on evidence that contributes to safe and high-quality patient outcomes within healthcare microsystems.

(l) Create a safe care environment that results in high quality patient outcomes.

(m) Revise the plan of care based on an ongoing evaluation of patient outcomes.

(n) Demonstrate clinical judgment and accountability for patient outcomes when delegating to and supervising other members of the healthcare team.

(o) Develop a beginning understanding of complementary and alternative modalities and their role in health care. 

(p) Develop an awareness of patients as well as healthcare professionals’ spiritual beliefs and values and how those beliefs and values impact health care.

(q) Manage the interaction of multiple functional problems affecting patients across the lifespan, including common geriatric syndromes.

(r) Understand one’s role and participation in emergency preparedness and disaster response with an awareness of environmental factors and the risks they pose to self and patients

(s) Engage in caring and healing techniques that promote a therapeutic nurse patient relationship.

(t) Demonstrate tolerance for the ambiguity and unpredictability of the world and its effect on the healthcare system as related to nursing practice.” (pp. 31-32).

Conclusion

4

4

An effective conclusion identifies the main ideas and major conclusions from the body of your essay. Minor details are left out. Summarize the benefits of the pertinent BSN Essential and sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) pertaining to scholarship for evidence-based practice.

Clarity of writing

6

6

Use of standard English grammar and sentence structure. No spelling errors or typographical errors. Organized around the required components using appropriate headers. Writing should demonstrate original thought without an over-reliance on the works of others.

APA format

2

2

All information taken from another source, even if summarized, must be appropriately cited in the manuscript and listed in the references using APA (6th ed.) format:

1. Document setup

2. Title and reference pages

3. Citations in the text and references.

Total:

100

100

A quality essay will meet or exceed all of the above requirements.

Grading Rubric

Assignment Criteria

Meets Criteria

Partially Meets Criteria

Does Not Meet Criteria

(Introduction – see note under requirement #4 above)

(8 pts)

Short introduction of selected BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) pertinent to scholarship for evidence-based practice. Rationale is well presented, and purpose fully developed.

7 – 8 points

Basic understanding and/or limited use of original explanation and/or inappropriate emphasis on an area.

5 – 6 points

Little or very general introduction of selected BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008). Little to no original explanation; inappropriate emphasis on an area.

0 – 4 points

You Decide Reflection

(80 pts)

Excellent self-assessment of skills, knowledge, and integrative abilities pertinent to healthcare policy and advocacy. Reflection on pertinent BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) supported with examples.

70 – 80 points

Basic self-assessment of skills, knowledge, and integrative abilities pertinent to healthcare policy and advocacy. Reflection on pertinent BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) not supported with examples.

59 – 69 points

Little or very general self-assessment of skills, knowledge, and integrative abilities pertinent to healthcare policy and advocacy. Little or no reflection on pertinent BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008) or reflection not supported with examples.

0 – 58 points

Conclusion

(4 pts)

Excellent understanding of pertinent BSN sub- competencies (AACN, 2008). Conclusions are well evidenced and fully developed.

3 – 4 points

Basic understanding and/or limited use of original explanation and/or inappropriate emphasis on an area.

2 points

Little understanding of pertinent BSN sub-competencies (AACN, 2008). Little to no original explanation; inappropriate emphasis on an area.

0 – 1 point

Clarity of writing

(6 pts)

Excellent use of standard English showing original thought with minimal reliance on the works of others. No spelling or grammar errors. Well organized with proper flow of meaning.

5 – 6 points

Some evidence of own expression and competent use of language. No more than three spelling or grammar errors. Well organized thoughts and concepts.

3 – 4 points

Language needs development or there is an over-reliance on the works of others. Four or more spelling and/or grammar errors. Poorly organized thoughts and concepts.

0 – 2 points

APA format

(2 pts)

APA format correct with no more than 1-2 minor errors.

2 points

3-5 errors in APA format and/or 1-2 citations are missing.

1 point

APA formatting contains multiple errors and/or several citations are missing.

0 points

Total Points Possible = 100 points

NUR4287 Course Reflection Guidelines.docx 10/22/20

1

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Accounting homework help

*Students should type directly into the chart below.

ARTICLE CRITIQUE

Parts of Article Critique

Student Responses

Your First and Last Name


Author(s) First and Last Name

Article Title

Publication Date: Year

Journal Name

Journal Volume

Journal Number

Journal Pages

Article Abstract: highlight and copy the exact abstract from the article chosen and paste the abstract here

Takeaway: In a bulleted list, write a few sentences about what you have learned from the article.

*The takeaway should be written in your own words with no similarity.


Accounting homework help

1

Week 5 Assignment

Student Name

Course

Date

Question 1

Current Value

As illustrated by the outcomes of comparing New Backhoe with the Old Backhoe, the Old Backhoe needs to be overhauled since it shows to have a higher current value compared to the New Backhoe.

Payback Period

The payback period for the New Backhoes will be calculated by:

Payback period= Original investment/payback

= $200,000/$43900= 4.6 years.

For the Old Backhoes:

= $55,000/ $30,425 = 1.8 years.

The organization needs to overhaul the old system since it is showing to have a shorter payback period and the original outlay of the investors is appearing to be at stake within the short period.

Profitability Index

The profitability of the New Backhoes will be calculated as follows:

Profitability Index = PV of Future Cash Flows / Original Investment

= $100,893/ $200,000 = ½ or 0.5

The profitability margin of Old Backhoes on the other hand will be:

= $127,952/ $55,000= 2.3

The conclusion is therefore that the Old Backhoe needs to be overhauled since its profitability is relatively higher than that of the New Backhoe.

Question 2

Of course there are physical paybacks of overhauling the Old Backhoe. The reason for this is that the current employees are already familiar on how to use the system and will therefore require no training. The only thing they need to do is to familiarize themselves on its functionality to increase productivity.

Question 3

From the outcomes acquired from making comparison between the current value, payback period along with the profitability index of the Old and New Backhoes, I would offer the company the recommendation that they should overhaul the old system. The reason for this is that the Old Backhoe is cheap to overhaul instead of procuring a New Backhoe since the new one will demand a higher original and training cost to be incorporated fully into the organization.

Accounting homework help

4

Financial Risk Mitigation Plan

John Conner II

ACC 599: Accounting Capstone

Strayer University

Dr. Mohammad Sumadi

1 May 2022

Risk refers to the chances of an event to occur that will either have a negative or positive impact on the project should it occur (Margaret, 1). This paper will create a financial risk mitigation plan for Shopify, an e-commerce venture. The e-commerce companies such as Shopify conduct their business in the online space and handle a lot of data for the retailers and clients. Online transactions, in most cases, face a lot of internal and external risks in which, some of the risks are natural disasters. The anecdotal evidence indicates that the risks associated with e-commerce are mainly hacking, interception of credit card numbers, and viruses. A proactive risk mitigation plan is one of the ways to eradicate the challenges associated with e-commerce (Margaret, 1). Risk mitigation is an integral part of Shopify that involves monitoring sales and determining whether the sales of products are running appropriately.

Project initiation usually is the first phase of identifying the risk. As the organization grows, more risks are identified. When a risk is identified, the probability of its occurrence is first ascertained. Next, the degree of its impact is assessed and scheduled before the cost, scope, and quality is analyzed. Finally, their priority of occurrence is analyzed. Risk documentation is done in two stages; the first stage involves a contingency plan that details what should be carried out before and during a security concern. The second stage involves developing a contingency plan that is implemented before the occurrence of a risk. The impact of the risk can also be minimized through an emergency plan.

The risk register should record the identified risks at the start and end of the business. The entry grade risks about the chances of the risk happening, the severity of the risk impact, subsequent results, and high-level risk mitigation plans should also be documented in the register. It is vital to keep and update the register regularly to ensure effectiveness in risk mitigation. The risk register in the case of Shopify should include the common frauds Shopify and the e-commerce industry face.

Common Frauds for Shopify and the e-commerce Industry

There are several types of fraud a company such as Shopify, among others in the e-commerce industry, can be exposed to. Fraud exposures are associated with a variety of consequences. The exposure types can be the political, social, financial, market, or business risks depending on the type of the company. The major types of fraud include; Double checking, payroll, friendship, and over-ordering. According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners for accounting fraud, payroll fraud is the topmost of the types of fraud listed. Payroll fraud occurs in 28% of enterprises worldwide (Garrett, 2). It includes falsifying employees and misclassifying the employees in the organization. An independent accountant or auditor should be used to reconcile the enterprise payroll quarterly to minimize payroll fraud. In addition, the time-keeping system of the company should be reconciled with the payroll account to minimize such fraud cases. Double-checking involves paying a vendor two times for the same products delivered, for instance, paying a company supplying products $900 and again paying the same account to them but using the identity of the supplying company in the system so that it appears as if the vendor is legitimate (Garrett, 2). Monthly reconciliation of bank accounts can be used to minimize double-checking fraud. This would identify the multiple payments recorded in the system in a given month. Over-ordering is a fraud where a vendor is ordered to deliver excess products. When delivered, the excess products are returned by an employee in exchange for the gift card, purchase cheaper products and keep the remaining balance for their interests. To minimize over-ordering fraud in the company, checks, and balances between the accounting and the receiving clerks should be conducted. The accountant should also set up a policy that requires any returns to be credited back to the company’s account (Garrett, 2).

Friendship fraud is expected in the e-commerce industry. It involves hiring a family member or relative to work for someone. It is not ethical to hire employees based on how close you are related. Instead, employers should hire employees based on their work experience, education, accountability, integrity, and recommendations from their past employers (Coderr, 3). These frauds have similar consequences since they all lead to the affected company losing vast sums of money. The money lost through fraudulent activities would instead be used to develop infrastructure, pay employees and other stakeholders, and revenue to the company.

Strategies to Mitigate the Financial Risks

There are various strategies to mitigate financial risks. A fraud risk management system is one of the most effective tools to mitigate financial risks and fraud. The program should comprise; commitment, roles and responsibilities, affirmation process, fraud risk assessment, investigation process, reporting procedures, corrective actions, fraud awareness, continuous monitoring, and quality assurance (ACFE, 4). Fraud prevention involves measures that can be put in place to prevent fraud, such as training, policies, procedures, and communication. In contrast, detection involves recognizing whether the occurrence will occur or not based on techniques and activities in the company.

The development of the fraud detection system is the best tool with the highest cost-benefit factors. Experienced employees and staff training is the first step in this program. This will help foster a mindset that recognizes fraud and logically takes the appropriate mechanisms to prevent the fraud. For instance, in the falsification of vendor fraud, the organization should consider carrying out checks on organizations or companies with similar phone numbers and addresses to verify the details of every vendor to avoid fraud. Having system checks for duplicate invoices and altered or falsified invoices will also help the company detect and prevent fraud. Data analysis can also be incorporated into the fraud detection system to carry out repetitive tests on the specific data set. Data analysis helps carry out system checks in the entire system and can detect fraud before becoming substantial.

Mitigation of financial risks should be the role and responsibility of every employee in a company. The managers should enact an internal control system to detect and prevent any fraudulent activities concerning the financial statements and reporting. Employees have the responsibility to report any usual activity to their manager. The Sarbanes Oxley act requires the auditor to assess the anti-fraud programs for their clients and provide their findings concerning the assessment of the company’s internal controls. The external auditors should take the responsibility of examining and reporting the losses made in the company through fraud and other financial risks. The finance director should take responsibility for investigating the fraud allegations and conducting anti-fraud plan updates. Shopify fraud officers should take the responsibility of investigating fraud allegations and implement any updates made in the anti-fraud plan. The integration of ethical codes in the culture of employees helps to promote the integrity of employees and consequently minimizes fraud. The organization should also pay adequate salaries and reward the employees appropriately to motivate the employees. Happy and motivated employees are less likely to commit fraud and have utmost integrity toward the culture of the organizations (ARASTL, 5).

In summary, financial risk and fraud have become a way in which many companies are losing resources, and there is a need to come up with ways to mitigate the financial risks. There are various roles in fighting fraud and minimizing financial risks; however, the managers are responsible for fighting fraud. In addition, conducting internal audits also help to offer a vital defense line against fraud by monitoring fraud (Coderr, 3). Therefore, today’s technology can improve the effectiveness and efficiency of anti-fraud programs and risk mitigation, and organizations need to embrace technology to mitigate financial risks.

References

1. Margaret W., Kevin D. (2018). Financial Risk Management for Management Accountants. Management Accounting Guideline. Retrieved from:

https://www.cimaglobal.com/Documents/ImportedDocuments/cid_mag_financial_risk_jan09.pdf

2. Garrett, Matt, (n.d.). 4 Kinds of Fraud That Could Destroy Your Business. Retrieved from https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227689

3. Coderr, D.G., (2004), Data analysis techniques and tips for detecting and preventing fraud. Retrieved from http://www.corporatecomplianceinsights.com/7-steps-preventing-detecting-fraud/

4. ACFE.com. (n.d.), Planning and Conducting a Fraud Examination., Retrieved from https://www.acfe.com/

uploadedFiles/Shared_Content/Products/Books_and_Manuals/2014%20Sample%20Chapter_Planning%20and%20Conducting%20a%20Fraud%20Examination.pdf

5. ARASTL, (November 2013). How Corporate Culture Can Prevent Fraud. Retrieved from

How Corporate Culture Can Prevent Fraud

Accounting homework help

Inputs

Direct Materials Total CVP Analysis
Total Variable Costs Per unit
Sales Price Per unit
Variable costs
Markup
Sale price
Contribution Margin Per unit
Total cost of direct materials, per batch Selling price
Number cookies per batch less: Total variable costs
Cost of direct materials per cookie
Times cookies in sales unit
Total cost of direct materials, per unit
Direct Labor Total
Total cost of direct labor, per batch
Number cookies per batch
Cost of direct labor per cookie
Times cookies in sales unit
Total cost of direct labor, per unit
Variable Manufacturing Overhead Total
Total cost of variable MOH, per batch
Number cookies per batch
Cost of VMOH per cookie
Times cookies in sales unit
Total cost of VMOH, per unit
Variable Operating Expenses Total
Total cost of variable operating expenses, per unit
Fixed Manufacturing Expenses, Per Month Total
Total cost of fixed manufacturing expenses, per month
Less: Depreciation Expense
Total cash paid for fixed manufacturing expenses
Fixed Operating Expenses Total
Total cost of fixed operating expenses, per month
Less: Depreciation Expense
Total cash paid for fixed operating expenses

Operating Budgets

Sales & Cash Collections Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units Sold
Selling price per unit
Total sales
Cash collected, CM
Cash collected, 1M
Cash collected, 2M
Total cash collected
Production Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units Sold
Add: Desired Ending Inventory
Units needed
Less: Beginning Inventory
Units to produce
Direct Materials Cash Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR APR MAY
Units to produce
Add: Desired Ending Inventory
DM Needed for production
Less: Beginning Inventory
Units of DM Needed
x Cost of DM per unit
Total cost of DM
Paid in CM
Paid in 1M
Paid in 2M
Total cash paid
Direct Labor Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units to produce
x Direct labor cost per unit
Total cost of direct labor
Manufacturing Overhead Cash Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units to produce
x Variable MOH rate
Total Variable MOH
Add: FMOH Cash Payments
Total MOH Cash Payments
Add: Non-Cash FMOH
Total MOH
Operating Expense Cash Payments Budget
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Units Sold
x Variable OpExp rate
Total Variable OpExp
Add: FOpEx Cash Payments
Total OpEx Cash Payments
Add: Non-Cash FOpEx
Total OpEx

Financial Budgets

Cost to manufacture per unit
QTR
DM per unit
DL per unit
VMOH per unit
Total variable manufacturing cost
Total FMOH
/ Units produced
FMOH per unit produced
Total CoGS per unit
Your Cookie Co.
Combined Cash Budget
For the months and quarter ended,
Jan Feb Mar QTR
Beginning Cash
Add: Owner contributions
Proceeds from loan
Cash collections
Cash Available
Less: Payments for DM
Payments for DL
Payments for MOH
Payments for OpExp
Capital expenditures
Cash payments
Cash before financing
Add: Cash from (paid to) line of credit
Less: Interest paid
Ending cash
Interest Calculations:
Outstanding Debt
Interest
Your Cookie Co.
Income Statement (Absorption)
For the quarter ended,
QTR
Sales revenue
Less: Cost of Goods Sold
Total CoGS per unit
x Units sold
Total CoGS
Gross Profit
Less: Operating expenses
Variable OpEx per unit
x Units sold
Total Variable OpEx
Add: Fixed OpEx
Total OpEx
Operating income (loss)
Less: Interest expense
Net Income (Loss)
Your Cookie Co.
Balance Sheet
For the quarter ended,
QTR
Assets
Cash
Accounts Receivable
Inventory, Raw Materials
Inventory, Finished Goods
Equipment
Less: Accumulated Depreciation
Total Assets
Liabilities
Accounts Payable
Line of credit
Bank loan
Total Liabilities
Equity
Common Stock
Retained earnings
Total Equity
Total Liabilities and Equity

Accounting homework help

Vehicle Cost Analysis

Proximity Bus Service
Vehicle Cost Analysis
Bus ID Cost
per Mile
Miles Driven Maintenance
Cost
Mileage
Cost
Total Cost Total Cost
per Mile
701 2.01 19964 283.22 40127.64 40410.86 2.0241865358
702 1.88 16660 393.8 31320.8 31714.6 1.903637455
703 1.87 14949 323.2 27954.63 28277.83 1.8916201753
704 1.91 14905 476.61 28468.55 28945.16 1.9419765179
705 1.7 11242 232.79 19111.4 19344.19 1.7207071695
706 1.65 14662 497.23 24192.3 24689.53 1.6839128359
707 1.79 16061 275.32 28749.19 29024.51 1.8071421456
708 1.88 14777 281.62 27780.76 28062.38 1.8990579955
709 1.69 18484 465.94 31237.96 31703.9 1.7152077472
Totals 16.38 141704 3229.73 258943.23 262172.96 1.8501450912
Average 358.8588888889 28771.47 29130.3288888889 1.843049842
Highest 497.23 40127.64 40410.86 2.0241865358
Lowest 232.79 19111.4 19344.19 1.6839128359

Miranda Crenshaw_x000D_CSC 101

Accounting homework help

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Essay for ENG 130: Literary Response for Plot

This assignment focuses on your ability to: learn how to identify the plot devices of a piece of
literature; craft your own creative piece with similar plot devices.

The purpose of completing this assignment is: as a student and a career professional, you will
need to read and summarize many different forms of literature. Very often, you will need to report out
on those summaries. This is a good practice in developing those skills!

Prompt (What are you writing about?)

• After reading the stories in the unit, select one story to write an analysis of the plot on. Please
answer the following questions about that short short story or fairy tale in one paragraph:
What is the plot of the story and how clear is that plot? How does the plot influence the
overall story?

• Both “The Invisible String” and “Swan of the Gods” deal with the question of what connects
us to other people and to the universe? Be it strings we cannot see or stars that we each look
at throughout time, connections are one of the main things that drive human interactions and
help us navigate the world.

o Create your own work of fiction with a clear plot or sequence of events that focuses

on the invisible or visible connections that exist in the world. The story should be no
more than 500 words in length. You may organize the story into however many
paragraphs you would like, but please make sure not to go over 500 words. The
subject of your story is entirely up to you, but please make sure it is appropriate for
an academic setting. Your story should have a main character, a simple conflict,
and some form of a resolution.

Instructions (how to get it done):

• Write your response that details the prompt above. Be sure to analyze one of the short
short stories or fairy tales. Then, create your own story.

Requirements:

• Your response should be at least two paragraphs (does not include the title page).

• Your response should have a properly APA formatted title page. The title page template is in
the Unit 1 resources.

• Please use proper APA format if you quote, paraphrase, or summarize the story by including
an in-text citation after the evidence and a reference listed on the References page. Also,
remember to use quotation marks if you include a direct quote.

• The paper should be double spaced with 1-inch margins. Choice of fonts: 11-point Calibri,
11-point Arial,12-point Times New Roman.

• Please be cautious about plagiarism. Make sure to use internal citations for direct quotes,

ENG 130 Literature and Comp

Literary Response for Plot as a Device

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

paraphrases, and new information.

Students: Be sure to read before you write, and again after you write.

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Rubric for Plot Literary Response
Does Not Meet

Expectations
0-11

Below
Expectations

12-13

Needs
Improvement

14-15

Satisfactory

16-17

Meets
Expectations

18-20

Organization

Writing is not
organized to
present clear and
fluid ideas.

Writing is
minimally
organized to
present clear and
fluid ideas.

Writing is
somewhat well
organized to
present clear and
fluid ideas.

Writing is
mostly well
organized to
present clear and
fluid ideas.

Writing is
very well
organized to
present clear and
fluid ideas.

Analysis No analysis of the
piece of literature
and literary
element is
completed.

Minimal analysis
of the piece of
literature and
literary element is
completed.

Some analysis of
the piece of
literature and
literary element is
completed.

Most analysis of
the piece of
literature and
literary element is
completed.

Strong analysis of
the piece of
literature and
literary element is
completed.

Creative Piece Writer does not
submit a creative
piece focused on
the literary
element of the
unit or the piece is
very
underdeveloped.

Writer submits a
creative piece
focused on the
literary element of
the unit that
needs significant
development.

Writer submits a
creative piece
focused on the
literary element of
the unit that
needs further
development.

Writer submits a
creative piece
focused on the
literary element of
the unit that
needs slightly
more
development.

Writer submits a
creative piece
focused on the
literary element of
the unit that has a
clear
development.

Grammar and
Mechanics

Grammar and
mechanics’ errors
make the essay
incomprehensible

Grammar,
spelling,
punctuation, and
mechanics errors
occur throughout
document.

Several errors in
grammar,
punctuation,
spelling and
mechanics
present.

Some spelling,
grammar,
punctuation and
mechanical errors
are evident.

Free of
punctuation,
spelling,
grammar, and
other mechanical
errors.

APA Formatting APA format not
used.

Errors in four
areas of APA
format and style.

Errors in three
areas of APA
format and style.

Errors in two
areas of APA
format and style.

No errors in APA
format and style.

*A zero can be earned if the above criteria are not met. *Plagiarism will result in a zero.

  • Essay for ENG 130: Literary Response for Plot
    • Prompt (What are you writing about?)
    • Instructions (how to get it done):
    • Requirements:
  • Rubric for Plot Literary Response

Accounting homework help

Alabama[edit]
Auburn (Auburn University)[1]
Florence (University of North Alabama)
Jacksonville (Jacksonville State University)[2]
Livingston (University of West Alabama)[2]
Montevallo (University of Montevallo)[2]
Troy (Troy University)[2]
Tuscaloosa (University of Alabama, Stillman College, Shelton State)[3][4]
Tuskegee (Tuskegee University)[5]
Alaska[edit]
Fairbanks (University of Alaska Fairbanks)[2]
Arizona[edit]
Flagstaff (Northern Arizona University)[6]
Tempe (Arizona State University)
Tucson (University of Arizona)
Arkansas[edit]
Arkadelphia (Henderson State University, Ouachita Baptist University)[2]
Conway (Central Baptist College, Hendrix College, University of Central Arkansas)[2]
Fayetteville (University of Arkansas)[7]
Jonesboro (Arkansas State University)[8]
Magnolia (Southern Arkansas University)[2]
Monticello (University of Arkansas at Monticello)[2]
Russellville (Arkansas Tech University)[2]
Searcy (Harding University)[5]
California[edit]
Angwin (Pacific Union College)[2]
Arcata (Humboldt State University)[5]
Berkeley (University of California, Berkeley)[5]
Chico (California State University, Chico)[2]
Claremont (Claremont McKenna College, Pomona College, Harvey Mudd College, Scripps College, Pitzer College, Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont Graduate University)[5]
Cotati (California State University, Sonoma)[2]
Davis (University of California, Davis)[1]
Irvine (University of California, Irvine)
Isla Vista (University of California, Santa Barbara)[2]
University Park, Los Angeles (University of Southern California)
Merced (University of California, Merced)
Orange (Chapman University)
Palo Alto (Stanford University)
Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona, WesternU)[9][10][11] and formerly Pomona College
Redlands (University of Redlands)
Riverside (University of California, Riverside, California Baptist University, La Sierra University)
Sacramento (California State University, Sacramento)
University District, San Bernardino (California State University, San Bernardino, American Sports University)
San Diego (University of California, San Diego, San Diego State University)
San Luis Obispo (California Polytechnic State University)[2]
Santa Barbara (Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara City College, University of California, Santa Barbara, Westmont College)[2]
Santa Cruz (University of California, Santa Cruz)[2]
Turlock (California State University, Stanislaus)
Westwood, Los Angeles (University of California, Los Angeles)[2]
Whittier (Whittier CollegeRio Hondo College)
Colorado[edit]
Alamosa (Adams State College)[2]
Boulder (University of Colorado at Boulder)[12]
Durango (Fort Lewis College)[2]
Fort Collins (Colorado State University)[13]
Golden (Colorado School of Mines)
Grand Junction (Colorado Mesa University)
Greeley (University of Northern Colorado)
Gunnison (Western State College)[2]
Pueblo, Colorado (Colorado State University-Pueblo)
Connecticut[edit]
Fairfield (Fairfield University, Sacred Heart University)
Middletown (Wesleyan University)
New Britain (Central Connecticut State University)
New Haven (Yale University, University of New Haven, Southern Connecticut State University, Albertus Magnus College, Quinnipiac University)[14]
New London (Connecticut College, US Coast Guard Academy, Mitchell College)[2]
Storrs (University of Connecticut)[2]
Willimantic (Eastern Connecticut State University)[2]
Delaware[edit]
Dover (Delaware State University)[1]
Newark (University of Delaware)[1]
Florida[edit]
Ave Maria (Ave Maria University)
Boca Raton (Florida Atlantic University)
Coral Gables (University of Miami)
DeLand (Stetson University)[5]
Estero (Florida Gulf Coast University)
Gainesville (University of Florida, Santa Fe College)
Orlando (University of Central Florida)
Sarasota (New College of Florida, Ringling College of Art and Design, State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee)
St. Augustine (Flagler College)
St. Leo (St. Leo University)
Tallahassee (Florida State University, Florida A&M University)
Tampa (University of South Florida)
Georgia[edit]
Albany (Albany State University)
Athens (University of Georgia)[15]
Atlanta (Georgia State University, Georgia Tech, Emory)[2]
Carrollton (University of West Georgia)[2]*Dahlonega (North Georgia College & State University)[2]
Demorest (Piedmont College)[2]
Fort Valley (Fort Valley State University)[2]
Kennesaw (Kennesaw State University)
Milledgeville (Georgia College & State University)[2]
Mount Vernon (Brewton-Parker College)[2]
Oxford (Oxford College)
Rome (Berry College, Shorter University)
Savannah (Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah State University, Savannah College of Art and Design)
Statesboro (Georgia Southern University)[5]
Valdosta (Valdosta State University)[2]
Waleska (Reinhardt College)[2]
Young Harris (Young Harris College)[2]
Hawaii[edit]
Manoa (University of Hawaii at Manoa)[2]
Idaho[edit]
Moscow (University of Idaho)[2]
Pocatello (Idaho State University)[2]
Rexburg (BYU-Idaho)[2]
Illinois[edit]
Carbondale (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)[5]
Champaign–Urbana (University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)[5]
Charleston (Eastern Illinois University)[2]
DeKalb (Northern Illinois University)[2]
Edwardsville (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)[2]
Evanston (Northwestern University)[2]
Lebanon (McKendree University)[2]
Macomb (Western Illinois University)[2]
Normal (Illinois State University)[2]
Peoria (Bradley University)
Indiana[edit]
Bloomington (Indiana University Bloomington)[5]
Crawfordsville (Wabash College)
Greencastle (DePauw University)[5]
Hanover (Hanover College)[2]
Marion (Indiana Wesleyan University)[2]
Muncie (Ball State University)[2]
Oakland City (Oakland City University)[2]
Richmond (Earlham College)[2]
South Bend (Notre Dame University[2])
Terre Haute (Indiana State University, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology)[2]
Upland (Taylor University)[2]
Valparaiso (Valparaiso University)
West Lafayette (Purdue University)[2]
Iowa[edit]
Ames (Iowa State University)[2]
Cedar Falls (University of Northern Iowa)[2]
Cedar Rapids, Iowa (Coe College )
Decorah (Luther College)[5]
Fayette (Upper Iowa University)[2]
Grinnell (Grinnell College)[15]
Iowa City (University of Iowa)[15]
Lamoni (Graceland University)[2]
Mount Vernon, (Cornell College)
Orange City (Northwestern College)[2]
Sioux Center (Dordt College)[2]
Storm Lake (Buena Vista University)[2]
Waverly (Wartburg College)[2]
Kansas[edit]
Baldwin City (Baker University)[5]
Emporia (Emporia State University)[2]
Hays (Fort Hays State University)[2]
Lawrence (University of Kansas, Haskell Indian Nations University)[15]
Manhattan (Kansas State University, Manhattan Christian College)[15]
Pittsburg (Pittsburg State University)[2]
Kentucky[edit]
Bowling Green (Western Kentucky University)[2]
Columbia (Lindsey Wilson College)[2]
Georgetown (Georgetown College)
Highland Heights (Northern Kentucky University)
Lexington (University of Kentucky, Transylvania University[5]
Louisville (University of Louisville)
Morehead (Morehead State University)[2]
Murray (Murray State University)[5]
Richmond (Eastern Kentucky University)[2]
Williamsburg (University of the Cumberlands)[2]
Wilmore (Asbury University, Asbury Theological Seminary)[2]
Louisiana[edit]
Baton Rouge (Louisiana State University, Southern University)
Grambling (Grambling State University)[5]
Hammond (Southeastern Louisiana University)[2]
Lafayette (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Monroe (University of Louisiana at Monroe)[2]
Natchitoches (Northwestern State University)[2]
Ruston (Louisiana Tech University)[2]
Thibodaux (Nicholls State University)[2]
Maine[edit]
Augusta (University of Maine at Augusta)[2]
Bar Harbor (College of the Atlantic)
Brunswick (Bowdoin College)
Farmington (University of Maine at Farmington)[2]
Fort Kent (University of Maine at Fort Kent)
Gorham (University of Southern Maine)[2]
Lewiston, Maine (Bates College)
Orono (University of Maine)[2]
Waterville (Thomas College, Colby College)
Maryland[edit]
Annapolis (United States Naval Academy, St. John’s College)
Chestertown (Washington College)[2]
College Park (University of Maryland, College Park)[16]
Cumberland (Allegany College of Maryland)
Emmitsburg (Mount St. Mary’s University)[2]
Frostburg (Frostburg State University)[5]
Princess Anne (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)[5]
Towson (Towson University, Goucher College)[2]
Salisbury (Salisbury University)[2]
Westminster (McDaniel College)
Massachusetts[edit]
Boston (Boston University, Boston College, Boston Conservatory, New England Conservatory, Brandeis University, Northeastern University, UMass Boston, Emmanuel College, Bunker Hill Community College, Roxbury Community College, Suffolk University, Simmons College, among many others)
Bridgewater (Bridgewater State College)[2]
Cambridge (Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)(Lesley University, Cambridge College, Longy School of Music)[15]
Chestnut Hill (Boston College)
The Colleges of Worcester Consortium:
Dudley (Nichols College)
North Grafton (Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University)
Paxton (Anna Maria College)
Worcester (Assumption, Becker, Clark University, Holy Cross, Mass. College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Quinsigamond Community College, UMass Medical School, Worcester State University, Worcester Polytechnic Institute)
The Five College Region of Western Massachusetts:
Amherst (Amherst College, Hampshire College, University of Massachusetts Amherst)[15]
Northampton (Smith College)
South Hadley (Mount Holyoke College)
Fitchburg (Fitchburg State College)
North Adams (Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts)
Springfield (American International College), (Springfield College), and (Western New England College)
Waltham (Bentley University), (Brandeis University)
Williamstown (Williams College)
Framingham (Framingham State University)
Michigan[edit]
Adrian (Adrian College, Siena Heights University)
Albion (Albion College)[17]
Allendale (Grand Valley State University)
Alma (Alma College)
Ann Arbor (University of Michigan)[1]
Berrien Springs (Andrews University)[2]
Big Rapids (Ferris State University)[2]
East Lansing (Michigan State University)[2]
Flint (Kettering University, University of Michigan-Flint)
Hillsdale (Hillsdale College)
Houghton (Michigan Technological University)[5]
Kalamazoo (Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College)[2]
Marquette (Northern Michigan University)[2]
Midland (Northwood University)
Mount Pleasant (Central Michigan University)[2]
Olivet (Olivet College)[2]
Saginaw (Saginaw Valley State University)
Sault Ste. Marie (Lake Superior State University)
Spring Arbor (Spring Arbor University)[2]
Ypsilanti (Eastern Michigan University)[2]
Minnesota[edit]
Bemidji (Bemidji State University)[2]
Crookston (University of Minnesota Crookston)[2]
Duluth (University of Minnesota Duluth, Lake Superior College, The College of St. Scholastica, University of Wisconsin–Superior, Duluth Business University
Faribault, South Central College
Mankato (Minnesota State University, Mankato),[2] Bethany Lutheran College
Marshall (Southwest Minnesota State University)[2]
Moorhead (Minnesota State University, Moorhead, Concordia College)[18]
Morris (University of Minnesota Morris)[2]
Northfield (Carleton College, St. Olaf College)[5]
North Mankato, South Central College
St. Cloud (St. Cloud State University, The College of St. Scholastica)[2]
St. Joseph (College of Saint Benedict)[2]
St. Peter (Gustavus Adolphus College)[2]
Winona (Winona State University, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota)[19]
Mississippi[edit]
Cleveland (Delta State University)[2]
Hattiesburg (University of Southern Mississippi)[20]
Itta Bena (Mississippi Valley State University)[2]
Oxford (University of Mississippi)[2]
Starkville (Mississippi State University)[2]
Missouri[edit]
Bolivar (Southwest Baptist University)[2]
Cape Girardeau (Southeast Missouri State University)[2]
Columbia (University of Missouri, Stephens College, Columbia College)[20]
Fayette (Central Methodist University)[2]
Fulton (Westminster College and William Woods University).
Kirksville (Truman State University, A. T. Still University)[2]
Maryville (Northwest Missouri State University)[2]
Rolla (Missouri University of Science and Technology)[2]
Warrensburg (University of Central Missouri)[5]
Montana[edit]
Bozeman (Montana State University)[2]
Dillon (University of Montana Western)[2]
Missoula (University of Montana)[5]
Nebraska[edit]
Chadron (Chadron State College)[5]
Crete (Doane College)[2]
Kearney (University of Nebraska at Kearney)[2]
Lincoln (University of Nebraska at Lincoln)[5]
Peru (Peru State College)[2]
Seward (Concordia University)[2]
Wayne (Wayne State College)[2]
Nevada[edit]
Las Vegas (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
Reno (University of Nevada, Reno)
New Hampshire[edit]
New London, New Hampshire (Colby-Sawyer College)
Durham (University of New Hampshire)[2]
Hanover (Dartmouth College)[5]
Henniker (New England College)
Keene (Keene State College)[2]
Plymouth (Plymouth State University)[2]
Rindge (Franklin Pierce University)
New Jersey[edit]
Ewing (The College of New Jersey), (Rider University)
Jersey City (New Jersey City University), (Saint Peter’s University)
Glassboro (Rowan University)[2]
Hoboken (Stevens Institute of Technology)
Madison (Drew University), (Fairleigh Dickinson University), (College of Saint Elizabeth)
Newark (Rutgers University), (New Jersey Institute of Technology), (UMDNJ)
New Brunswick (Rutgers University)[5]
Princeton (Princeton University)[5]
Union (Kean University)
West Long Branch (Monmouth University)
New Mexico[edit]
Hobbs (University of the Southwest)[2]
Las Cruces (New Mexico State University)[2]
Las Vegas (New Mexico Highlands University)[2]
Portales (Eastern New Mexico University)[2]
Silver City (Western New Mexico University)[2]
New York[edit]
Alfred (Alfred University, Alfred State College)[2]
Albany (SUNY Albany, Siena College, Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany Law School, Albany Medical College, College of Saint Rose, Excelsior College, Maria College of Albany, Mildred Elley, Sage College of Albany)
Aurora (Wells College)[21]
Binghamton (Binghamton University)[2]
Brockport (SUNY Brockport)[5]
Buffalo (University at Buffalo)
Canton (St. Lawrence University, SUNY Canton)[2]
Clinton (Hamilton College)[2]
Cobleskill (SUNY Cobleskill)[2]
Delhi (SUNY Delhi)[2]
Fredonia (SUNY Fredonia)[2]
Geneseo (SUNY Geneseo)[2]
Geneva (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
Hamilton (Colgate University)[2]
Ithaca (Cornell University, Ithaca College)[1]
Morningside Heights, Manhattan (Columbia University, Barnard College, Teachers College, Manhattan School of Music, Jewish Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, Bank Street College of Education)
New Paltz (SUNY New Paltz)[2]
Oneonta (SUNY Oneonta, Hartwick College)[2]
Oswego (SUNY Oswego)[2]
Plattsburgh (SUNY Plattsburgh)[2]
Potsdam (SUNY Potsdam, Clarkson University)[2]
Poughkeepsie (Vassar College, Marist College)[2]
Purchase (Purchase College, Manhattanville College)[2]
Rochester (University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology, Nazareth College, St. John Fisher College, Monroe Community College, Roberts Wesleyan College, SUNY Brockport, SUNY Empire State College)[2]
Saratoga Springs (Skidmore College)[2]
Seneca Falls (New York Chiropractic College)
Stony Brook (Stony Brook University)
Syracuse (Syracuse University, SUNY ESF, Upstate Medical University)
Tivoli (Bard College)
Troy (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Russell Sage College, Hudson Valley Community College)
West Point (United States Military Academy)
North Carolina[edit]
Banner Elk (Lees-McRae College)
Boiling Springs (Gardner-Webb University)[2]
Boone (Appalachian State University)[2]
Buies Creek (Campbell University)[2]
Chapel Hill (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)[20]
Cullowhee (Western Carolina University)[2]
Davidson (Davidson College)[5]
Durham (Duke University, North Carolina Central University)[5]
Elon (Elon University)[2]
Greensboro (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro College, Guilford College, North Carolina A & T State University, Bennett College)
Greenville (East Carolina University)[2]
Hickory (Lenoir-Rhyne University)[2]
Mars Hill (Mars Hill College)[2]
Mount Olive (Mount Olive College)[2]
Pembroke (University of North Carolina at Pembroke)[2]
Wilmington, North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)
Wingate (Wingate University)[2]
Winston-Salem (Wake Forest University, University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Salem College, Winston-Salem State University)
North Dakota[edit]
Fargo (North Dakota State University)[18]
Grand Forks (University of North Dakota)[5]
Ohio[edit]
Ada (Ohio Northern University)[2]
Alliance (University of Mount Union)
Ashland (Ashland University)[2]
Athens (Ohio University)[2]
Berea (Baldwin Wallace College)
Bluffton (Bluffton University)[2]
Bowling Green (Bowling Green State University)[2]
Cedarville (Cedarville University)[2]
Columbus (Ohio State University)
Delaware (Ohio Wesleyan University)
Fairborn (Wright State University)
Findlay (University of Findlay)
Gambier (Kenyon College)[2]
Granville (Denison University)[2]
Hiram (Hiram College)[2]
Kent (Kent State University)[2]
Nelsonville (Hocking College)[2]
New Concord (Muskingum College)[2]
Oberlin (Oberlin College)[5]
Oxford (Miami University)[5]
Rio Grande (University of Rio Grande)[2]
Wilberforce (Wilberforce University, Central State University)[2]
Oklahoma[edit]
Ada (East Central University)[2]
Alva (Northwestern Oklahoma State University)[2]
Durant (Southeastern Oklahoma State University)[2]
Edmond (University of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma Christian University)[2]
Goodwell (Oklahoma Panhandle State University)[2]
Langston (Langston University)[5]
Norman (University of Oklahoma)[1]
Stillwater (Oklahoma State University)[5]
Tahlequah (Northeastern State University)[2]
Tulsa (The University of Tulsa)
Weatherford (Southwestern Oklahoma State University)
Oregon[edit]
Ashland (Southern Oregon University)[2]
Corvallis (Oregon State University)[20]
Eugene (Lane Community College, Northwest Christian University, University of Oregon)[20]
Forest Grove (Pacific University)
Klamath Falls (Klamath Community College, Oregon Institute of Technology)
La Grande (Eastern Oregon University)[2]
Marylhurst (Marylhurst University)
McMinnville (Linfield College)
Monmouth (Western Oregon University)[2]
Newberg (George Fox University)
Pennsylvania[edit]
Altoona (Penn State Altoona)
Annville (Lebanon Valley College)[2]
Bethlehem (Lehigh University, Moravian College)
Bloomsburg (Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Bradford (University of Pittsburgh at Bradford)
California (California University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Carlisle (Dickinson College)
Cecil B. Moore, Philadelphia, also known as “Templetown” (Temple University)
Clarion (Clarion University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Collegeville (Ursinus College)
Cresson (Mount Aloysius College)[2]
East Stroudsburg (East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Edinboro (Edinboro University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Erie (Gannon University, Mercyhurst College, Penn State Erie)
Gettysburg (Gettysburg College)[2]
Greensburg (Seton Hill University, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg)
Grove City (Grove City College)[2]
Huntingdon (Juniata College)[2]
Indiana (Indiana University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Johnstown (University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown)
Kutztown (Kutztown University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Lancaster (Franklin & Marshall)
Lewisburg (Bucknell University)[5]
Lock Haven (Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Loretto (St. Francis University)[2]
Mansfield (Mansfield University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Meadville (Allegheny College)
Mont Alto (Penn State Mont Alto)
Millersville (Millersville University of Pennsylvania)[2]
New Wilmington (Westminster College)[2]
North East (Mercyhurst North East)
University City, Philadelphia (Drexel University, University of Pennsylvania, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia)
Oakland, Pittsburgh (Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh, Carlow University)
Reading (Albright College, Alvernia University, Penn State Berks)
Selinsgrove (Susquehanna University)[2]
Shippensburg (Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania)[2]
Slippery Rock (Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania)[2]
State College (Pennsylvania State University)[22]
Villanova (Villanova University)
Waynesburg (Waynesburg University)
West Chester (West Chester University of Pennsylvania)
Wilkes-Barre (King’s College, Wilkes University)
Williamsport (Lycoming College, Pennsylvania College of Technology)[2]
Rhode Island[edit]
Kingston (University of Rhode Island)[2]
Providence (Brown University, (University of Rhode Island), Rhode Island School of Design, Johnson and Wales University, Providence College, Community College of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College, and Roger Williams University.)
South Carolina[edit]
Central (Southern Wesleyan University)[2]
Charleston (College of Charleston, The Citadel, MUSC)
Clemson (Clemson University)[2]
Clinton (Presbyterian College)
Columbia (University of South Carolina)[14]
Due West (Erskine College)
Florence (Francis Marion University)
Greenwood (Lander University)
Orangeburg (South Car